health

Fungal Infection
2:27 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

An Update On The Valley Fever Investigation In Eastern Washington

Coccidioidomycosis, a fungus that can lead to valley fever, often lives in dry, arrid areas. It has recently been discovered in soil samples from eastern Washington.
Credit Flickr Photo/Eddie McHugh (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Dr. Tom Chiller, a fungal expert at the CDC, about the discovery of Coccidioides in eastern Washington. The fungus causes Valley Fever, and so far three cases have been confirmed. Chiller is assisting the state of Washington in its investigation of Valley Fever.

White House Advisor
3:30 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

How To Make The Affordable Care Act Better

Credit Ezekiel Emanuel's book "Reinventing American Health Care."

Steve Scher talks to Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel about his book “Reinventing American Health Care.”  Dr. Emanuel was previously a health care adviser to the White House.

Affordable Care Act
3:16 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

Why Oregon's Health Exchange Website Failed

Credit Flickr Photo/Sara Westermark (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter and producer Kristian Foden-Vencil about  Oregon's troubled health exchange website, Cover Oregon.

Local Research
3:15 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

UW Scientists Regenerate Heart Tissue In Monkeys

Marcie Sillman talks to Dr. Chuck Murry, a researcher at the University of Washington, about rebuilding heart tissue with human stem cells.

Valley Fever
8:19 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Source Of Fungal Illness Discovered In Eastern Washington Soil

Coccidioides’ tube-shaped cells living in the soil can break into spores and go airborne.

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 8:57 am

A disease-causing fungus thought to be confined to the deserts of the U.S. Southwest has been discovered in soil samples from eastern Washington.

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Global Health
3:13 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

The Resurgence Of Polio Around The World

A child receives an oral polio vaccine in Nigeria.
Flickr Photo/Gates Foundation

Steve Scher talks to Apoorva Mallya, senior program officer in the polio program at the Bill And Melinda Gates Foundation, about the rise in polio around the world.

Addiction
7:01 am
Fri May 2, 2014

As Heroin Booms, Recovery Clinics Struggle To Keep Up

Jamie Heidenreich rides back to Hoquiam after getting methadone treatment in Olympia, Wash. It's an hour each way.
Credit KUOW Photo/Elizabeth Jenkins

Heroin, the drug of the 90s, is back and thriving in Washington state.

“A hot batch of heroin hits the streets, and we will know it in a couple of hours because of the overdoses,” Hoquiam Police Chief Jeff Myers said. In Washington, opiate-related deaths have doubled in the past decade.

But efforts to provide recovery services have struggled to keep up with the drugs. And for many, particularly in rural areas where distances stretch for hours, it can be tough to reach clinics.

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Public Health
3:06 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

As FDA Moves To Regulate E-Cigarettes, What's Happening In King County?

Flickr Photo/Joseph Morris (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Dr. David Fleming, director of King County Public Health, about the Food and Drug Administration's decision to regulate electronic cigarettes.

Alternative Healing
10:23 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Experimental Technique Coaxes Muscles Destroyed By War To Regrow

A cross-section of skeletal muscle in this light micrograph shows the individual, parallel muscle fibers (red). These fibers work in concert to power movement.
Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR ScienceSource

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:35 am

Ron Strang was on patrol in Afghanistan when a primitive land mine exploded.

"When it went off, it came across the front of my body," Strang says. Though he survived the blast, his left leg was never the same. Shrapnel destroyed most of the muscle on his left thigh. He used to run, swim and hike. But even after he recovered, those days of carefree movement were gone.

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Author Interview
4:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Regulating Caffeine: How Much Is Too Much?

Credit Murray Carpenter's book, "Caffeinated."

Ross Reynolds speaks with journalist Murray Carpenter about his book, “Caffeinated: How Our Daily Habit Helps, Hurts, and Hooks Us."

The book takes a closer look at the common drug we take for granted on a daily basis.

Food Safety
4:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Why Europe Finds American Apples Distasteful

Credit Flickr Photo/Ron (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde speaks with Sonya Lunder, senior scientist with the Environmental Working Group, about the European Union's ban of diphenylamine. The post-harvest pesticide dip is applied to most non-organic American apples.

Heroin
12:31 am
Wed April 30, 2014

An Afghan Village Of Drug Addicts, From Ages 10 To 60

Ahmad, who wouldn't give his last name, smokes heroin. He lives in a makeshift village filled with drug addicts called Kamar Kulagh, on the outskirts of the western Afghan city of Herat.
David P. Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 10:50 am

Herat is one of the most graceful cities in Afghanistan. Its traditions go back to the Persian empire, with its exquisite blue and green glass, and its thriving poetry scene.

Now Herat is struggling with a darker side: drug addiction at a higher rate than almost anywhere else in the country.

In a dusty ravine on the outskirts of the city, Ahmad, a scruffy 20-year-old, is striking a match to inhale heroin.

It's a simple act he repeats throughout his day — heating a dark slab of heroin paste smeared on a bit of foil so he can smoke it.

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Health Exchange
3:42 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

New Rule Promises 'No Surprises' From Health Insurance Plans

Credit Washington State Insurance Commissioner Mike Kriedler.

Marcie Sillman checks in with Washington State Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler about a new rule that will mandate increased transparency for plans offered on the Washington state health exchange.

Global Health
3:17 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

How Far We've Come In 30 Years Of HIV Research

Flickr Photo/Jon Rawlinson (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Mitchell Warren about the breakthroughs and challenges of HIV prevention over the last 30 years. Warren is the executive director of AVAC, an international non-governmental organization that works on HIV prevention.

Warren said that one of the greatest breakthroughs in HIV-AIDS prevention was the rise of the citizen activism that pushed for funding, creativity and urgency in research. "AIDS really changed how research happened," he said. "Science changed because communities ‘acted up.’"

Technology
3:17 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

Health On Your Smartphone: A Doctor Weighs In

Fit Bit uses your smart phone to track the steps a person takes in a day.
Flickr Photo/Bryan Zug (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds asks Dr. David Bates, physician at the Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, how consumers can navigate the exploding marketplace of mobile health apps.

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