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Will the Affordable Care Act become history under the Trump Administration? Republicans want to see it go or replaced with something else.

But some people, like Harriet Prudhomme, worry about what’s going to happen if it does.  

Bill Radke speaks with Harborview psychiatrist Doug Zatzick about what ordinary Americans can do to get through the final hours of the election; including whether or not it is OK to spend the rest of election day in a kiddie pool full of Jell-O shots.

Federal scientists have launched another test in human volunteers of a Zika vaccine. This one uses a more traditional approach than an experiment that started in August.

Whether it's an IUD, a shot, an implant, or a daily pill, birth control is a regular part of many adult women's lives. It has left a lot of women asking: Why not men?

Another child in Washington has contracted an illness that causes muscle weakness.

Health officials are now investigating nine possible cases of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), including one child from Bellingham who died Monday in Seattle. The latest child hospitalized is from Snohomish County.

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times health reporter JoNel Aleccia about a mysterious illness that's caused the hospitalization of nine children in Washington state this fall. One child has died so far.  

Premature Births Rise Once Again, Despite Efforts To Prevent Them

Nov 1, 2016

The number of preterm births in the United States rose in 2015 for the first time in eight years, according to data presented Tuesday by the March of Dimes. Babies born too early face a risk of health complications that can last a lifetime.

The organization also reported that racial minorities continue to experience early labor at higher rates.

Preterm births increased from 9.57 to 9.63 percent of births in 2015, an additional 2,000 babies born prematurely in the U.S., the report found.

As the cat-tentious — or rather, contentious — political season winds down, there's something afoot that may help voters relax: cat yoga. Animal shelters in Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, New York, Texas and other states across the country are partnering with yoga studios to raise money and increase adoptions.

Young children and teenagers are increasingly likely to be poisoned by opioid painkillers that are often prescribed for other family members, a study finds.

The rate of children hospitalized for opioid poisoning increased 165 percent from 1997 to 2012, from about 1.40 per 100,000 kids to 3.71 per 100,000.

Hey, Looks Like Americans Are Finally Eating More Fish

Oct 31, 2016

San Diego native Megan Olbur didn't grow up eating much seafood beyond tuna sandwiches, fish sticks or the occasional salmon dinners her parents made. But in 2015, when Olbur became pregnant with a daughter of her own, she heeded the advice of her physician and deliberately began adding more seafood to her diet as a way to boost brain development and to ensure the health of her growing baby.

It turns out, she wasn't alone in upping her fish fare.

Brittany Johnson says the Freedom Foundation contacted her by mail to tell her she didn't have to be a member of SEIU. She said it was never clear how the right-wing organization got her information, and she wants her privacy.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

UPDATE 10/31/16, 2 p.m. 

On Friday the Washington state Attorney General’s Office said it filed a complaint in Thurston County Superior Court against the Freedom Foundation for campaign finance violations. The attorney general specifically said Freedom Foundation had failed to report its spending to oppose Initiative 1501.


Ken Peterson, Maria Martinez and Todd Rickdal
KUOW Photo/Stephen Gomes

Thousands of people are eligible for free medical, vision and dental care from the Seattle-King County Health clinic, starting Thursday at Key Arena.

And while you don't need money, you do need patience.


Bill Radke talks to Thaisa Way, professor of landscape architecture at the University of Washington, about the school's new Population Health Initiative. The University received a $210 million donation from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation this week for a new building on campus that will house the project. 

Public health authorities and infectious disease specialists now say we may not be able to rid the U.S. of the Zika virus. Despite months of intense work — including house to house inspections and aggressive mosquito control — federal, state and local officials have not been able to stop the spread of Zika in Miami.

It's one of the biggest medical mysteries of our time: How did HIV come to the U.S.?

By genetically sequencing samples from people infected early on, scientists say they have figured out when and where the virus that took hold here first arrived. In the process, they have exonerated the man accused of triggering the epidemic in North America.

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