health

Mental Health
12:25 am
Mon June 30, 2014

Online Psychotherapy Gains Fans And Raises Privacy Concerns

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 10:32 am

Lauren Kay has never met her therapist in person. The 24-year-old entrepreneur found it difficult to take time off work for appointments.

So she started seeing a psychotherapist online.

"It's definitely been different," she says. Kay, who lives in New York, found her counselor through an online therapy service called Pretty Padded Room. When it's time for an appointment, all she has to do is log in to the website, click a link and start video chatting.

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Life In Cartoons
2:18 am
Sun June 29, 2014

Her Baby Is At Risk: Lauren's Story

Courtesy of Lauren R. Weinstein/Nautilus

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 12:55 pm

They're odds. That's all they are. Not fate, just probabilities. Lauren Weinstein, cartoonist, is having a baby, and she's told — out of the blue — that she and her husband are both carriers of the gene that causes cystic fibrosis. They are sent to a genetic counselor. What happens next — told in five beautifully drawn, emotionally eloquent cartoons — tells what it's like to walk the edge for a few weeks. She's so many things (sad, funny, scared, puzzled), and then there's the ender. Take a look.

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Emotional Contagion
1:43 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

Facebook Scientists Alter News Feeds, Find Emotions Are Affected By It

A man poses for photographs in front of the Facebook sign on the Facebook campus in Menlo Park, Calif.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 10:39 am

For one week back in 2012, Facebook scientists altered what appeared on the News Feed of more than 600,000 users. One group got mostly positive items; the other got mostly negative items.

Scientists then monitored the posts of those people and found that they were more negative if they received the negative News Feed and more positive if they received positive items.

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Health
11:41 am
Fri June 27, 2014

When Heat Stroke Strikes, Cool First, Transport Later

Portugal's Cristiano Ronaldo takes a water break during the 2014 World Cup soccer match between Portugal and the U.S. in Manaus, Brazil, on June 22.
Siphiwe Sibeko Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 2:38 pm

The first-ever World Cup water break (taken during the game between Portugal and the United States this week) is a reminder that we all need to take extra precautions when playing in the heat.

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Psychiatric Boarding
5:17 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

State Supreme Court Considers Constitutionality Of Psychiatric Boarding

Credit Flickr Photo/Michael J (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Parking mentally ill patients in the emergency room while waiting for treatment is a common practice, but  also controversial. Psychiatric boarding, as it's known, used to be the exception. But in the last six years, the number of patients who've experienced it has nearly tripled.  Now the state Supreme Court is considering whether boarding is constitutional.

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RadioActive Youth Media
3:58 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

The S-Word And Stuff: Teens On Sex And Health

Rowan Neel writes a sex blog for teens.
KUOW Photo/Isaac Noren

Most people have had the "birds and bees" talk with their parents, and even more of us can recall those awkward moments in health class when we were still young and thought that the opposite sex had cooties.

In this month’s podcast you’ll hear about how one girl took initiative and taught her friends a thing or two about sex. There are teens helping teens everywhere, including here in Seattle where youth volunteer at a much needed teen crisis hotline.

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Health Warning
8:06 am
Thu June 26, 2014

FDA Warns Of Life-Threatening Reactions With Acne Products

This might help with pimples, but be aware of risky reactions.
iStockphoto

The announcement that popular over-the-counter acne treatments can cause rare but life-threatening reactions sure got our attention. Who among us hasn't slathered that stuff on our face?

The reactions include throat tightness, shortness of breath, wheezing, low blood pressure, fainting and collapse. Hives and swelling of body parts where the products were not applied were also reported. And 44 percent of the people affected were sick enough to be hospitalized.

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Health
3:18 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Fatal Birth Defects Surge In South Central Washington, And No One Knows Why

Marcie Sillman talks with Washington State Department of Health's Dr. Kathy Lofy about the work the state is doing to figure out why south central Washington is experiencing a surge of fatal birth defects.

Health News
8:05 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Heart Of The Matter: Treating The Disease Instead Of The Person

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 6:28 am

A 56-year-old man is having lunch with his wife at a seafood restaurant just outside Boston when he develops crushing chest pain. He refuses an ambulance, so the man's wife drives him to the ER.

What happens next says a lot about the difference that being a doctor or a patient can make in how one feels about the health care system.

First, how did the patient and his wife see the trip to the hospital?

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Patient Safety
3:14 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Feds To Washington State Hospitals: Improve Patient Safety Or Face Penalties

Marcie Sillman talks with freelance journalist Lisa Stiffler about infection rates and patient safety in Washington hospitals.

Family Care
3:05 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Depression Not The Only Risk After Giving Birth

Marcie Sillman talks to Dr. Leslie Butterfield about the challenges new parents face and how to spot the signs of postpartum depression and anxiety.

One in five new moms and one in ten new dads have some form of postpartum depression. Postpartum Support International and Postpartum Support International of Washington State are resources for information about postpartum depression, as well as local support groups and counselors. You can also call the toll-free line anytime to talk to a volunteer: 1.888.404.7763.

Health News
11:39 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Expert Who First Spotted Lyme In Ticks Calls 'Chronic' Lyme Overdiagnosed

Lyme disease is spread by deer ticks like this one. (Getty Creative Images)

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 12:58 pm

Health officials are warning it’s going to be a big year for deer ticks, which of course can carry the bacteria that causes Lyme disease.

It’s most prevalent in the Midwest and Northeastern states such as Connecticut, where the bacteria was first traced to ticks in the town of Lyme.

Dr. Allen Steere was 33 years old when he made that discovery in 1975, after a Connecticut resident came to him with swollen joints, flu-like symptoms and pounding headaches that no doctors could diagnose.

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Health Care
7:21 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Employer Health Costs Are Expected To Rise In 2015

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 7:40 am

Increases in health costs will accelerate next year, but changes in how people buy care will help keep the hikes from reaching the speed seen several years ago, PricewaterhouseCoopers says.

The prediction, based on interviews and modeling, splits the difference between hopes that costs will stay tame and fears that they're off to the races after having been slow since the 2008 financial crisis.

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Health
12:31 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Measles Outbreak In Ohio Leads Amish To Reconsider Vaccines

Amish show up at a makeshift clinic to get vaccinated against the measles. There's been an outbreak of measles among the Amish in central Ohio.
Sarah Jane Tribble Sarah Jane Tribble

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 6:53 am

The Amish countryside in central Ohio looks as it has for a hundred years. There are picturesque pastures with cows and sheep, and big red barns dot the landscape.

But something changed here, when, on an April afternoon, an Amish woman walked to a communal call box. She picked up the phone to call the Knox County Health Department. She told a county worker she and a family next door had the measles.

That call spurred nurse Jacqueline Fletcher into action.

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Environmental Health
2:22 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Pregnant Women Should Eat More Fish, Unless It Was Caught In Puget Sound

Flickr Photo/Rob Bixby (CC-BYC-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Bill Daniell, an associate professor at the UW's School of Public Health, about Washington's fish consumption rate — a little number that has a big impact.

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