health

Reward Mentality
10:21 am
Fri July 11, 2014

If Exercise Feels Like Work, Mindless Snacking May Follow

In a recent study, participants who focused on the exercise of walking ate more M&Ms than people who focused on music while walking.
Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 11:35 am

If we hit the gym, don't we deserve a little extra something, maybe something sinfully sweet? The idea that sacrifice begets reward is embedded in our collective thinking.

But a fascinating new study from the folks at the Cornell Food and Brand Lab shows how this thinking might backfire. Thinking of exercise as work can lure us into mindlessly devouring calorie-bombs, such as a big helping of pudding or extra handfuls of M&M's. And compensating for physical activity with sweet treats this way may lead to weight gain.

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Mental Health
9:55 am
Fri July 11, 2014

Suicide Attempt Survivors Seek A Voice In Helping Others At Risk

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun July 13, 2014 3:29 am

In 2008, Cara Anna was working as a foreign correspondent in China and feeling overwhelmed by isolation, hostility from local authorities and a gnawing feeling that she was a failure. Her anguish led her to try suicide.

After waking up alive, she kept her attempt a secret. Asking for help seemed shameful, and she feared for her job if her employer found out. But after a second suicide attempt 15 months later, Anna realized that to recover she needed to stop feeling ashamed.

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Treatment Ethics
2:07 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

In Defense Of Research On Unconscious Patients At Harborview

Marcie Sillman talks with bioethicist Arthur Caplan about the implications of involving people in a research study without their consent. Caplan directs the bioethics division at New York University's Langone Medical Center.

Medicine
1:18 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

HIV Returns In Infected Toddler, Dashing Hopes Of Imminent Cure

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 4:04 pm

Federal officials have announced that a young Mississippi girl, once thought to have been cured of HIV, now once again has detectable levels of the virus. This is a setback not just for the child, but also for hope of eradicating HIV in infants with a potent mix of drugs at birth.

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Aging
1:10 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Aging With Grace For Boomers With Disabilities

Lan Remme, 67, works with his wife Laura at Adaptive Yoga in the Central District.
Credit KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

There’s a lot of emphasis on healthy aging, as more baby boomers hit 65. But what about those seniors who don’t ski and skydive for fun?

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Stress Survey
12:27 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Bingeing On Bad News Can Fuel Daily Stress

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 12:34 pm

If you're feeling stressed these days, the news media may be partly to blame.

At least that's the suggestion of a national survey conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health.

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Contraceptive Coverage
2:03 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Senator Murray Wants To Reverse Hobby Lobby Decision

Marcie Sillman talks with Senator Patty Murray about her legislation that would override the Supreme Court's recent Hobby Lobby decision concerning contraceptive coverage. Sillman also speaks with Washington Post congressional reporter Wesley Lowery for analysis on how far Murray's legislation might go.

Health Care
8:04 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Complaint Says Insurance Plans Discriminate Against HIV Patients

HIV/AIDS drugs like AZT are lifesavers for many people. But insurers' policies on paying for the drugs vary widely.
Will & Deni McIntyre Science Source

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 8:12 am

Four Florida insurers allegedly discriminate against people with HIV/AIDS by structuring their prescription drug benefits so that patients are discouraged from enrolling, according to a complaint filed by health advocacy groups.

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Steel Nets Installed
11:29 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Suicide-Proofing The Golden Gate Bridge

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:11 pm

Suicide prevention activists have long called for a way to prevent people from jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge, but officials have resisted, citing cost and design concerns.

Last week, the board that oversees the Golden Gate Bridge voted to approve $76 million to install steel suicide “nets” that would hang largely out of sight 20 feet under the walkways of the iconic bridge in San Francisco Bay.

Since the bridge opened in 1937, there have at least 1,600 suicides of people jumping off it. Last year, there was a suicide or an attempt almost every other day.

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Health
7:41 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Is Obesity A Disease?

In one study, reading a fictional news story about "obesity genes" led participants to eat more cookies in a subsequent task.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:22 am

Last year the American Medical Association voted to recognize obesity as a disease. In a June 18, 2013, press release, AMA board member Dr. Patrice Harris explained:

"Recognizing obesity as a disease will help change the way the medical community tackles this complex issue that affects approximately one in three Americans."

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Health News
4:07 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Stressed Out: Americans Tell Us About Stress In Their Lives

Aly Hurt/NPR

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 4:57 am

Everyone seems to talk about feeling stressed out. But what's the reality of stress in America these days?

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a nationwide poll in March and early April to find out.

Our questions zeroed in on the effect of stress in Americans' lives. We asked about people's personal experiences with stress in the preceding month and year. We also asked about how they perceived the effects of stress, how they cope with stress and their attitudes about it.

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Childhood Obesity
2:21 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Michelle Obama Lobbies Congress Over School Lunch Program

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 10:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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It's Always Sunny
9:05 am
Thu July 3, 2014

What’s The Skin Cancer Rate In Your County?

Skin cancer by county, 2011 data.
Credit Washington State Department Of Health

This may come as a surprise, but if cloudy Puget Sound were a state, it would rank fourth in skin cancer rates.

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Lifestyle
1:38 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

A Misspent Youth Doesn't Doom You To Heart Disease

Had a bit too much fun in your 20s?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 7:34 am

We all know that a healthy lifestyle can keep heart disease at bay. But if like many of us you spent your 20s scarfing down pizza, throwing back a few too many beers and aggressively avoiding the gym, don't despair.

People who drop bad habits in their late 30s and 40s can reduce their risk of developing coronary artery disease, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Circulation.

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Women's Health
3:56 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Skip The Stirrups: Doctors Rethink Yearly Pelvic Exams

First-year medical student Michelle Gentile assists her classmate Abbie Harts as she performs a pelvic exam on a volunteer at Northwestern University.
Joshua Lott Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 1:57 pm

The American College of Physicians said Monday that it strongly recommends against annual pelvic exams for healthy, low-risk women.

In fact, the intrusive exams may do more harm than good for women who aren't pregnant or don't have signs of problems, a group of doctors wrote in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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