health

Workplace Wellness
11:32 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Tacoma Company Embarks On Health Makeover

Tacoma candy maker Brown and Haley got a visit from the CDC and local health coaches (from left: Brent Grider, Jason Lang, Sheila Pudists and Joe Maguno). The company is participating in CDC's year-long program to help improve workers' health. The health team's visit included a tour of the candy factory.
Credit KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

It’s hard enough to stay healthy at work. But imagine working at a candy factory, surrounded by sweet temptations. At Brown and Haley in Tacoma, workers are getting help to change their health habits. The candy maker and other employers in Pierce County are part of a national pilot program.

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Seattle Opera
9:00 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Providing Equal Health Care, Art Of Our City, And The Interfaith Amigos

Seattle Opera's audience seated in McCaw Hall are certainly awed by the "Ring" production, but probably can't imagine all the backstage work it requires.
Credit Flickr Photo/Felipe Fortes

Providing Equal Health Care
The Human Rights Campaign released its 2013 Healthcare Equality Index. The HEI is a survey of how health care facilities treat patients from the LGBT community. Both UW Medicine and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance were recognized for being  a “leader in LGBT health care equality." What does it mean to provide LGBT patient-centered care? Nicki McCraw, the assistant vice president of human resources for UW Medicine explains.  

Art Of Our City
This year could be the last time audiences see Seattle Opera’s current production of the Ring Cycle.  The four-part opera marathon is the story of Norse gods and goddesses, love and greed. The final opera, “Twilight of the Gods," ends with the destruction of the world as the gods and goddesses know it. What does it take to end the world?  Seattle Opera technical director Robert Schaub knows. He’s the man who helped turn the artistic vision into stage reality. Schaub took Marcie Sillman behind the scenes and then sat down to talk about theater magic.

The Interfaith Amigos On The Role Of Ritual
All of us have rituals we engage in.  Maybe you eat lunch at the same restaurant every day.  Maybe you celebrate the holidays each year in a similar manner.  How important is ritual to the human experience? The Interfaith Amigos muse on this subject.

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Public Health
11:30 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Anti-Smoking Cuts Pose Risk To Public Health

Flickr Photo/David Grant

Washington state is cutting back funding for the smoking cessation hotline. That means some people will only be able to call once. Are stop-smoking hotlines effective? Will this cutback lead to more smoking and higher public health care costs down the line? Ross Reynolds gets the answers from Dr. Abigail Halperin of the UW Tobacco Scholars Program in the UW School of Public Health.

RadioActive Youth Media
10:32 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Confessions Of A Teenage Tumblr Therapist

Host Madeline Ewbank was afraid you wouldn't listen to the end of this show. Srikar Penumaka worried the microphones recorded nothing.
KUOW Photo/Jenny Asarnow

A study conducted since the beginning of time reveals that 100 percent of people are worried about something.

Today, Srikar Penumaka and Madeline Ewbank conquer fear and anxiety. First, we hear from fellow RadioActivian Isaac Noren in his poem "Growing Up Fast." Next, ex-blogger Maddie LeClair shares the story of her time as a teen Tumblr therapist. Then you’ll hear about the irrational fears of our hosts as well as the good people of Pike Place Market, including the secret horrors of saunas and bubble tea.

On a more serious note, some recent studies show that one in five teens struggles with clinical depression. If you grapple with depression, or anything else really, and aren’t prepared to tell the people in your life about it, there are others out there ready to listen.

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Health Insurance
9:25 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Health Exchange Foreign Language Fact Sheets Get Poor Marks

Washington Health Benefit Exchange

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:02 am

Call it a case of “lost in translation.” Washington and Oregon’s new health insurance exchanges are getting poor marks for their efforts to communicate with foreign language audiences.

On the Washington Health Benefit Exchange website you can find fact sheets in eight foreign languages – from Cambodian to Somali. These one and two page documents are supposed to help uninsured families navigate the new world of the Affordable Care Act.

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Local Music
9:00 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Tuition-Free College, Menthol Risks, And Music From Shelby Earl

Singer-songwriter Shelby Earl and her band.
From Shelby Earl's Facebook page.

Tuition-Free Washington?
Oregon’s Legislature has voted to commission a study that would explore the idea of “tuition-free” college. The “Pay It Forward” idea would allow students to attend college for free and then pay for their degree based on their salary post-graduation. It has been catching on with lawmakers around the country who are looking for solutions to the high interest rates on college loans. State Representative Larry Seaquist is considering a proposal for the next legislative session. He explains what it could mean for access to higher education in our state.

Scientific Review On Menthol Cigarettes
Menthol cigarettes are easier to start and harder to quit. That’s the takeaway from a new scientific review from the Food and Drug Administration. Although the FDA didn’t find evidence that menthol cigarettes are more toxic than regular cigarettes, the evidence shows that smokers of menthols develop stronger addictions and have a tougher time quitting. We hear more about the public health risk of menthol cigarettes from Sarah Ross-Viles of Public Health Seattle-King County.

Singer-Songwriter Shelby Earl
Singer-songwriter Shelby Earl has just released her second album “Swift Arrows.” She’s no stranger to the music industry, having spent 10 years working in it before she left her corporate job to write and record her own album. She stopped by Weekday to talk and play some tunes.

Weekend Weather Forecast
State climatologist Nick Bond brings us a weather forecast for the weekend.

Injured Troops
9:07 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Military Disability System Making Progress, Still Falling Short Of Goals

Sgt. Jake Koetje while on deployment to Afghanistan in 2010.
Credit Courtesy Sgt. Koetje

For soldiers who are injured or wounded, the process for determining whether they’re eligible for medical retirement is long.

Many, including the Government Accountability Office, say too long.

In a 2012 report to the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee, the GAO found that soldiers at Washington’s Joint Base Lewis-McChord and other military installations were waiting nearly 400 days to get through the system.

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Marijuana Dependence
11:53 am
Wed July 24, 2013

It May Be Legal, But Is It Healthy? Medical Consequences Of Marijuana

Cannabis is considered relatively benign, but that doesn’t mean there are no health concerns. Ross Reynolds talks with UW Professor Emeritus Roger Roffman about marijuana dependence. 

Emergency Contraception
4:28 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Plan B Now Available In Drug Stores

The emergency contraception Plan B is now available in stores like Bartell Drugs.
Credit KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The emergency contraceptive, Plan B, is now available on many drug store shelves. Last month, the  US Food and Drug Administration approved the pill for over- the-counter purchase, with no age restrictions. The pill’s availability doesn’t end the debate over controversial prescriptions in Washington state.

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The Vitamin Myth
10:00 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Understanding Vitamins, Composer Lawrence Dillion, And Greendays

Flickr Photo/Lindsey Turner

Understanding The Vitamin Myth
There is often contradictory information about the health benefits of vitamins and supplements: take them, don’t take them, low vitamin D is tied to aging, Omega-3 might cause cancer. So how do doctors and nutritionists cipher through the different information to provide the best advice to patients? Dr. Calvin Kwan, clinical resident at Bastyr Center for Natural Health, and Mary Purdy, a registered dietitian with Seattle Healing Arts Center, explain when vitamins are and are not effective.

Composer Lawrence Dillion
The Seattle Chamber Music Society Summer Festival wraps up its 32nd season of performances in Benaroya Hall this week. Since 2007 the Society has premiered new pieces of chamber music through the efforts of its commissioning club. Club members pool together money to support the creation of work by leading American composers. This year’s piece, by composer Lawrence Dillon, premiered at the summer festival in Seattle on July 8. The composition “Sanctuary” is a musical musing for piano, horn and strings on the many meanings of the word. Dillon earned a doctorate in composition  from Juilliard in 1985. He was the youngest composer in the school’s  history ever to do so.  Dillon speaks with KUOW's Dave Beck and we'll hear recorded excerpts  from the premiere of “Sanctuary.”

Greendays Gardening
Our gardening panel includes a flower expert, native plant expert, and vegetable gardening expert. They answer your gardening questions every Tuesday.   

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Seattle Sports
9:00 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Mariner's Mid-Season Report, And Living With Parkinson's

Flickr Photo/David Grant

The M’s Mid-Season Report
Halfway through the major league baseball season, the Seattle Mariners have taken their fans on quite the wild ride. Long losing streaks, winning streaks and a whole bunch of injuries. But recently, there have been some glimmers of hope. Young players like Nick Franklin and Brad Miller have ignited the M’s offense. And Raul Ibanez is on the verge of breaking the record of hitting the most home runs by a 41-year-old. So what’s in store for the M’s the rest of this season? Larry Stone, who covers major league baseball for the Seattle Times, is here to discuss the rest of the season.

Living Well With Parkinson's
Medicine is making great advancements in the fight against Parkinson’s disease, even though there is still no cure. Advancements in gene therapy and a unique brain surgery are extending lives. But, it’s not just technology that’s helping patients, holistic medicine is also playing a role. A leading neurological researcher and one of her patients join us to share their story.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

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When Elderly Go Missing
12:00 pm
Fri July 19, 2013

Missing Person Cases Involving Dementia Challenge Police

Anacortes Police Chief Bonnie Bowers looks out on the marsh where 69-year-old William Landers' body was found.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Memory loss is one of the symptoms of dementia. So is wandering. Over the last five years, at least 10 people in Washington state have died after wandering away from where they live. It’s a problem that communities will have to confront as the population ages. But not all police departments are prepared for these kinds of incidents.

There are different challenges when searching for people with dementia than for other missing person cases. Certain kinds of information play a key role, too. For example, when an elderly person is reported missing medical information is critical; it can mean the difference between life and death.

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Food Safety
11:28 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Home Canning Hobby Leads To Near Fatal Medical Mystery

Austin Jenkins Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 7:17 am

Home canning is regaining popularity as part of the local food movement. If done right, families can enjoy home grown fruits, vegetables and even meat all through the winter. But if done wrong it can be devastating, if not deadly.

A lawyer for the state of Washington recently learned that lesson the hard way.

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Health
12:46 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Former High School Dropout Becomes WWU Neuroscientist In Race To Find Huntington’s Disease Cure

Jeff Carroll
Credit Wikipedia Commons

Sometimes, you’re just dealt a bad hand. Jeff Carroll was a high school dropout serving in the military when he learned his mother had Huntington's disease. It's genetic, and he soon learned he had it too. There’s no cure. So the diagnosis is a death sentence. But rather than despairing, Carroll turned his life around. And in the decade since his diagnosis, he’s become one of the most prominent researchers studying Huntington’s Disease. He’s now on staff at Western Washington University in Bellingham.
 

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, July 16:

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Health and Wellness
11:55 am
Wed July 10, 2013

How Much Protein Do We Really Need?

You’ve seen them: Naked Juices with 30 grams of protein per bottle. Cereals and snack bars boasting their mega-high protein content. More and more companies are using protein to sell their products. But how much do we actually need? Ross Reynolds talks with nutritionist Judy Simone about protein claims.  

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