health

Health Care
7:55 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Oops. Washington Health Exchange Miscalculates Subsidies For Thousands

The front page of the Website for the Washington State Health Care Benefit Exchange.

Washingtonians who have signed up for health plans through the health exchange and qualified for tax credits may have received wrong information.

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Health
12:27 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Recipe For Strong Teen Bones: Exercise, Calcium And Vitamin D

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Fri November 1, 2013 4:03 pm

It's really only a sliver of time when humans build the bulk of their skeleton. At age 9, the bones start a big growth spurt. And by the time puberty ends, around 14 or 15 years old, the adult-sized skeleton is all but done, about 90 percent complete.

But doctors say a lot of children aren't getting what they need to do that. Calcium and vitamin D are essential, sure, but so is lots of time jumping and running.

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Health
11:51 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Why Engineers Want To Put B Vitamins In 3-D Printers

This riboflavin-rich material can be used to print intricate, microscopic structures in three dimensions.
Courtesy of North Carolina State University

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 11:18 am

Almost every day it seems there's a new use for 3-D printing.

In medicine, the printers are already making prosthetic hands, hearing aid cases and parts of human ears.

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Public Health
11:06 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Meet The Woman Who Tells Your Exes They May Have An STD

Anna Halloran handles partner notification for gonorrhea cases at the Spokane Regional Health District. Most public health departments now have people on staff that notify partners of exposure to an STD.
Northwest News Network/Jessica Robinson

Public health officials are trying to stop a series of gonorrhea outbreaks in the Northwest. And they’re offering a service to infected patients: anonymous notification of former sexual partners.

That's right. There is a government worker out there whose job it is to call, text, Facebook or track down your exes to let them know they might have an STD. And the job has become a key part of controlling disease outbreaks.

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Health Research
10:37 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Insecticide Exposure Could Make You Fat, Washington Researchers Say

An old DDT insecticide poster. Researchers at Washington State University have linked DDT exposure to obesity generations later.
Flickr Photo/Kevin Krejci

Even if you haven’t been exposed to DDT in your lifetime, researchers say it could still have an effect on you – and your weight.

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Affordable Care Act
4:05 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Health Exchange Rollout: What The Feds Got Wrong And What Wash. Got Right

A HyperCard parody of the federal health care exchange, which has been plagued by technical issues since rolling out earlier this month.
Flickr Photo/Daniel Rehn

Congressional Republicans begin a series of hearings today on the problematic rollout of the federal government’s health exchange website. Since its launch earlier this month, healthcare.gov has been plagued by a number of technical issues and the Spanish language version hasn’t even launched yet.

Here in Washington, the health exchange rollout had a glitchy start, but overall, it’s fared much better than the federal website.

Bill Schrier is the former Chief Technology Officer for the city of Seattle. He currently serves as senior policy advisor to the chief information officer of Washington state. He talks with Marcie Sillman about what the other Washington did wrong, and what Washington state did right.

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Health
3:41 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Gonorrhea Outbreak Perplexes Washington Health Officials

Health officials across the Northwest are trying to figure out why they’re seeing a big upswing in the number of people with gonorrhea this year.

Washington announced Thursday five counties are in the midst of an outbreak of the infection.

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Ask The Dietitian
2:51 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Dietitian Mary Purdy On Avoiding The Midday Slump

Even if it's at your desk, dietitian Mary Purdy stresses a good fiber and protein breakfast to crush the midday slump.
Flickr Photo/Jennifer P.

It is a feeling that is all too common: the post-lunch midday slump. If you are feeling a little sluggish at your desk around 3 p.m. and need a pick me up, what should you do?

Registered dietitian Mary Purdy has a few suggestions to keep you sustained throughout the day. Put down the latte, caffeine is not one of them!

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Cardiology
3:22 pm
Wed October 23, 2013

The Progress Of Heart Disease Treatment In The US

A human heart.
From Wikipedia

There have been many innovations in heart disease care and prevention, and former Vice President Dick Cheney has been the beneficiary of nearly every one of those innovations during his three-decade long struggle with the disease. 

It was those medical developments that kept him alive until he received a heart transplant at the age of 71.  Now the former vice president is opening up about his experiences in a book he co-wrote with his cardiologist, “Heart: An American Medical Odyssey.”

The Record’s Steve Scher spoke with Dr. Nahush Mokadam, the co-director of heart transplantation at the University of Washington Medical Center, to get an update on heart disease treatment in the US and determine whether Cheney’s experience was unique.

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Stalled Research
12:58 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Antibiotics Can't Keep Up With 'Nightmare' Superbugs

On Tuesday night, PBS' Frontline will investigate how decades of antibiotic overuse has led to the emergence of drug-resistant superbugs.
Courtesy of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:15 pm

We're used to relying on antibiotics to cure bacterial infections. But there are now strains of bacteria that are resistant to even the strongest antibiotics, and are causing deadly infections. According to the CDC, "more than 2 million people in the United States every year get infected with a resistant bacteria, and about 23,000 people die from it," journalist David Hoffman tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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Health And Education
12:19 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Want Your Daughter To Be A Science Whiz? Soccer Might Help

Very few girls get the recommended 60 minutes of exercise daily. But physical activity could help with school, a study says.
evoo73 Flickr

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 9:22 am

Girls who were more physically active at age 11 did better at school as teenagers, a study finds. And the most active girls really aced science.

It's become pretty much a given that children do better academically when they get regular exercise, even though schools continue to cut or even eliminate recess time. But there's surprisingly little hard evidence to back that up.

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Affordable Care Act
10:00 am
Tue October 22, 2013

A Three-Week Checkup On Washington's Health Exchange

As part of implementing the Affordable Care Act, state and federal health exchanges kicked off three weeks ago. The launch has been no walk in the park. State-run exchanges and the federally-run, Healthcare.gov, have been plagued with website problems: failed-log ins, long wait times and, in the case of Washington’s own wahealthplanfinder.org, a non-functioning website for the first few days.

Despite its glitchy start, Washington has been touted as one of the best functioning state marketplaces. Marcie Sillman talks with spokesperson Michael Marchand from Washington’s Health Benefit Exchange.

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News
8:13 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Washington Proposes Medical Marijuana Registry, Tax Exemption

Mjpresson Wikimedia

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 5:48 pm

Medical marijuana patients in Washington would have to register with the state if they don’t want to pay pot taxes.

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Technology
3:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

When Playing Video Games Means Sitting On Life's Sidelines

The reSTART center for Internet addiction is in the woods outside Seattle. The initial, inpatient part of the program is held on a property that has a treehouse and a garden.
Rachel Martin NPR

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 1:49 pm

A facility outside Seattle, surrounded by pine trees, is a refuge for addicts — of technology.

There are chickens, a garden and a big treehouse with a zip line. A few guys kick a soccer ball around between therapy appointments in the cottage's grassy backyard.

The reSTART center was set up in 2009. It treats all sorts of technology addictions, but most of the young men who come through here — and they are all young men — have the biggest problem with video games.

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Health
4:54 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Paleontologist To Humans: Stop Sugar Binging, Start Moving More

Daniel Lieberman, an evolutionary biologist, writes that we may be living longer, but we are suffering from relatively new, preventable diseases.

We may be living longer, but we aren’t necessarily living better, argues Daniel Lieberman, an evolutionary biologist and author of Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health and Disease.

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