health

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Just because you have health insurance, doesn’t always mean you have a way to get to the doctor.

That explains why public health officials are starting to think of access to mass transit as a public health issue.

Starting in March, they’ll offer low-income people a special bus card that lets them go anywhere in King County for $1.50. That’s a deep discount. It even works on Sound Transit light rail.

When the British newspaper The Mirror reported in late December that a UK mother named Denise Sumpter was still breast-feeding her daughter Belle, who is 6 and a half years old, two experts were invited to weigh in on the practice.

Twelve years into a struggle with bulimia and anorexia, Jessie Joachim says she still feels guilty whenever she tells her therapist out loud that she has purged a meal.

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live.

A health care worker gives some much needed maternal care to an infant whose mother died from Ebola.
Courtesy of Karin Huster

Most days, Seattle nurse Karin Huster woke up around 6 a.m. for a quick bucket shower and breakfast before walking over to the Ebola treatment unit in Port Loko, Sierra Leone.

Outside, ambulances would queue up at all times of the day, packed with as many as eight patients at all stages of illness.

Flickr Photo/Chuck Coker (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Washington state lawmakers have a lot on their plates this legislative session: everything from how to fully fund basic education to a debate over how to control pollution. But some legislators also put medical marijuana regulation on their priority list.

File photo: brain
Flickr Photo/Saad Faruque (CC BY-SA 2.0)

An Oxford University researcher will soon test whether applying an electric current to part of the brain can help children learn math — an effect previously demonstrated in adults. And some parents are eager to gain access to the device.

New Ways Of Treating Trauma: Try Some Yoga

Jan 13, 2015

When a person experiences traumatic events, the aftermath can be extremely debilitating. Trauma not only affects the mind, but can have lifelong effects on the body.

Legalizing marijuana in Idaho has been a complete no-go, even as its neighbors have started licensing pot dispensaries and retail shops.

Editor's note: Some audiences may find portions of this content disturbing.

The World Health Organization reports that the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone may be leveling off — although nearly 250 new cases were reported there last week.

This is the story of a man whose ideas could have saved a lot of lives and spared countless numbers of women and newborns' feverish and agonizing deaths.

You'll notice I said "could have."

The year was 1846, and our would-be hero was a Hungarian doctor named Ignaz Semmelweis.

What would you do if you were locked in your body, your brain intact but with no way to communicate? How do you survive emotionally when you are invisible to everyone you know and love?

That's the first question asked by NPR's new program on human behavior, Invisibilia.

When the Legislature convenes next week, Rep. Sherry Appleton plans to introduce a bill for a silver alert system in Washington state.

Similar to the Amber Alert for children, this alert would be for elderly people with dementia who wander off. Appleton says 60 people went missing in the past year.

“Six-zero,” says Appleton. “I think it’s a lot of people.”

Two strains of highly contagious avian flu have been found in Washington and Oregon so far.

Why Bill Gates Is Commissioning Fine Art

Jan 8, 2015

Each year, about 6 million people die from diseases that are preventable with vaccines. And about 1 in 5 children around the world don't have access to life-saving vaccines.

But those are cold and dry statistics.

The Art of Saving A Life enlisted more than 30 artists to create images that bring those numbers to life — to spark conversations, interest and, ultimately, funding for vaccines.

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