health

Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg are smiling, standing in front of a backdrop emblazoned with the question: "Can we cure all diseases in our children's lifetime?" They're announcing a $3 billion initiative to achieve that goal, and they're calling it Chan Zuckerberg Science.

No sickness in the whole world by the time today's babies, like the couple's 9-month-old daughter Max Zuckerberg, are old folks?

Vancouver, B.C. -- A meeting of business and political leaders from Washington state and British Columbia has resulted in two agreements. One of those agreements hopes to speed up treatments for cancer. The other would create a border-straddling effort to boost innovation.

About one in five children in the United States shows signs of a mental health disorder — anything from ADHD to eating disorders to suicide.

And yet, as we've been reporting this month, many schools aren't prepared to work with these students. Often, there's been too little training in recognizing the problems, the staff who are trained are overworked, and there just isn't enough money.

Bill Radke talks to Washington State University professor Deborah A. Christel about a recent study she co-authored on plus-sized women and athletic clothing. In the study, she found that a majority of plus-sized women, or women who wear the size 16 and over, had to shop in the mens' clothing section to find athletic clothing that fit them. 

Kim Malcolm talks with Dr. Jeffrey Duchin about the outbreak of Legionnaires' disease at the University of Washington Medical Center. Duchin is health officer for Public Health - Seattle & King County.

The King County Council has unanimously approved the master plan for the $400 million Best Starts for Kids initiative voters passed last fall.

Half of the Best Starts for Kids funding will go toward early childhood efforts, like programs that send nurses on regular home visits with low-income moms and babies, a new system for infant and young child mental health, and increased spending on public health services for pregnant women and children.

Many people struggling with opioid addiction can't find a doctor to provide medication-assisted treatment, even though it's highly effective. One reason could be that doctors who are qualified to prescribe the medication typically treat just a handful of patients.

I'm the health reporter covering the Zika story here at WLRN in Miami, and I'm a pregnant woman.

When Florida Gov. Rick Scott made free Zika testing available to all pregnant Floridians through the Florida Department of Health, I was one of the more than 2,200 women who took him up on the offer.

Amy Pittman received a box with sample formula from a company that got her information from a pregnancy app. Pittman had already miscarried when the box arrived.
Courtesy of Amy Pittman

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Amy Pittman about her miscarriage and how the internet missed one of the biggest moments in her life. Pittman wrote an essay for the New York Times' Modern Love column about her experience. She tells Yandel what reaction she's received and how she thinks differently about big data. 

According to a new report from a state task force, the ratio of students to school nurses has more than doubled in the past five years in Oregon.

Privately insured people with cancer were diagnosed earlier and lived longer than those who were uninsured or were covered by Medicaid, according to two recent studies.

Cat-scratch disease, as the name suggests, is spread by cats. It has long been considered a mild illness, but a study finds that people are getting more serious complications, which can be fatal.

And kissing kittens increases the risk of being infected.

A water fountain at the UW Medical Center is off limits after the discovery of the Legionnaires' disease bacteria in part of the hospital.
KUOW PHOTO/MATT MARTIN

The bacteria that causes deadly Legionnaires’ disease has been found in the water supply in part of the UW Medical Center, health officials said Wednesday.

The disease has killed at least one patient at the hospital, and another patient was sickened but recovered.

There's no question that running changes your heart.

The issue is whether these changes are good or bad. I don't mean the occasional 3 miles once or twice a week, although even this minimal amount of exercise seems to have positive health benefits.

Sam struggled with depression in middle school.
KUOW Photo/Natalie Newcomb

Sam, 17, has a bright smile and is always making  her friends laugh.

But in seventh grade, Sam struggled. She was trying to figure out her role in the social ladder, and her parents were fighting, and she was feeling extremely sad.


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