hatcheries

Fish Populations
7:08 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Judge Reduces Hatchery Releases On Sandy River

A federal judge has ruled an Oregon state fish hatchery must limit the number of hatchery-bred fish it releases. The goal is to protect wild salmon and steelhead stocks, which could interbreed with the hatchery fish.
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 2:18 pm

A new court decision reduces the number of hatchery fish releases into Oregon's Sandy River this year.

The Sandy River Hatchery will be allowed to release 200,000 coho salmon this year. That's less than the 300,000 coho hatchery managers were planning to release.

Liz Hamilton, executive director of the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association, said in a statement that the reduction won't harm sport fishers.

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Restoring Tribal Diets
10:42 am
Thu December 19, 2013

Northwest Lab Hopes To Build The World's First Lamprey Hatchery

Pacific lamprey serve as an important food source for Northwest tribes. Their populations have dramatically declined throughout the Columbia River system.
Credit Flickr Photo/USFWS Pacific

Pacific lamprey were once a major staple in Northwest tribes’ diets. The oils were a source of nutrition. Babies used lamprey tails as teething rings.

Now, as numbers decline, lamprey only make it to the table during ceremonies or special occasions. Washington biologists hope to turn those numbers around and in doing so, may create the world's first lamprey hatchery.

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EarthFix Reports
1:05 pm
Thu December 12, 2013

Plan To End Hatchery Fish Release Would Give Wild Fish Refuge

A hatchery fish is found among wild fish returning to the Elwha River on the Olympic Peninsula this past spring. Wild fish advocates around the region have filed several lawsuits calling for restrictions on the use of hatcheries.
Credit EarthFix Photo/Ashley Ahearn

Fish and wildlife departments in Oregon, Washington and Idaho release millions of hatchery-raised salmon and steelhead into the rivers of the Northwest every year.

But a growing body of research suggests that hatchery fish are semi-domesticated and weaker than wild fish. Hatchery fish have also been shown to interbreed with the wild fish and compete for food.

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