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Officials at Northern Arizona University say a suspect is in custody following a shooting at the campus of the Flagstaff school in the early hours of Friday morning. One person was killed; three other victims are in the hospital.

"The first call of shots fired came in at 1:20 a.m.," the school says via Facebook. It adds that the campus is not on lockdown.

All of the victims are students; some were shot multiple times, police say.

Update at 9:30 a.m. ET: Fraternity Says Its Members Were Involved

After the mass shooting in Roseburg, Ore., last week, the national media gave a lot of attention to the fact that the local sheriff, John Hanlin, is an ardent supporter of gun rights. He'd written a letter to Vice President Joe Biden shortly after the Dec. 14, 2012, massacre of schoolchildren at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., saying gun control was not the answer. In the letter, Hanlin pledged not to enforce gun regulations he believed to be unconstitutional.

What wasn't widely reported was how common views like Hanlin's have become in law enforcement.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

More mental health treatment and gun control won't necessarily prevent mass shootings, but a new California law might help, says a public health researcher.

Flowers at a memorial for the 2014 Seattle Pacific University shooting.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Jeannie Yandel talks with Seattle Pacific University student Chris Howard about his experience dealing with the aftermath of the 2014 shooting at SPU in light of the recent school shooting at Umpqua Community College in  Roseburg, Oregon.

We want to cut through the spin with a new feature we're calling "Break It Down."

Break It Down is going to be a regular part of our campaign coverage. We're going to try some new things. It might read a little differently from time to time. But our goal is to zoom in on what the candidates are saying, and give you the factual breakdown you need to make a sound judgment.

It's hard to deny that the NRA has won the gun debate over the past 20 years.

Despite mass shootings — and despite some 80 to 90 percent of Americans saying they are in favor of background checks — no legislation expanding on the 1993 Brady Bill has passed Congress.

What's going on? Well, the debate over guns is hardly ever solely about background checks or other seemingly popular measures intended to curb gun violence.

Lacey Scroggins was in a writing class last week at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Ore., when a man burst in and started shooting people. When it was over, 10 people, including the shooter, were dead, and Lacey was covered in blood.

She survived, and she and her family credit one of the victims for that. She wasn't ready to tell the tale herself, so she asked her father to stand in.

Some southwest Oregon gun owners say they're worried that the shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg will spur lawmakers to pass more gun laws.

Community members gather for a candlelight vigil for those killed in a shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Ore., Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015.
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

We'll bring you the latest on investigations into the Roseburg, Oregon, shooting and last week's fatal Aurora Bridge crash. Plus: Shell’s Arctic oil abandonment as seen from the Aleutian Islands. Where did all the I-405 drivers go? And now that the Seattle Mariners have named Jerry Dipoto as their new general manager, will they finally put the right pretty Lego castle pieces in place and leave them there?

Bill Radke figures out the week’s news with former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn, journalist Erica C. Barnett, former state lawmaker Bill Finkbeiner, KUOW’s John Ryan reporting from Alaska, Seattle Times reporters Lewis Kamb and Geoff Baker, Northwest News Networks’s Chris Lehman and WSDOT tolling director Craig Stone.

After Thursday's mass shooting at an Oregon community college, which left nine people dead and more injured, President Obama aired his frustration over gun laws in the U.S. At a news conference Friday, he called on voters to push their representatives to take action.

"You just have to, for a while, be a single-issue voter, because that's what is happening on the other side," Obama said. "And that's going to take some time. I mean, the NRA has had a good start."

Authorities are trying to build a profile of the 26-year-old gunman who shot and killed 9 people and wounded as many at a western Oregon community college on Thursday in hopes of discovering what his motive might have been.

The Douglas County Sheriff, John Hanlin, has refused to say the shooter's name, stating that he doesn't want to "glorify" him, but officials have said he is Christopher Sean Harper-Mercer and that he was killed at the scene in a shoot-out with police.

Here's what we know about him:

You might have seen the article by now: " 'No Way To Prevent This,' Says Only Nation Where This Regularly Happens." The Onion, a satirical news site that runs fake news stories, has published a story with that headline three times over the last year and a half: this week after a shooter killed nine people at an Oregon community college; in June of this year after a violent rampage in a black Charleston church that also killed nine people; and last May, after a shooting at the University of California Santa Barbara that killed seven.

Douglas County Sheriff Vows To Not Use Shooter's Name

Oct 2, 2015

At a press conference Friday morning Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin repeated his vow about the Roseburg, Oregon, shooter who killed 10 people on Thursday.

Authorities in Oregon released the names of the nine people killed during a mass shooting at a community college in Roseburg, Ore.

John Hanlin, the Douglas County sheriff, read the names during a news conference Friday afternoon:

The victims ranged in age from 18 to 67. One of them was an 18-year-old soccer player, another had just enrolled at the college at 34 years old. Another 18-year-old was just about to take his brown belt test.

How Trauma Ripples Through A Community

Oct 2, 2015
Community members gather for a candlelight vigil for those killed in a shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Ore., Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015.
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

Jeannie Yandel sits down with Dr. Doug Zatzick, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Washington who also works with PTSD patients at Harborview Medical Center, to discuss how the Roseburg community can recover from the tragic mass shooting at Umpqua Community College in Oregon.

Chris Mintz was shot multiple times by a gunman at an Oregon community college Thursday, and now he's being called a hero, after it emerged that Mintz ran at the attacker and tried to block the door to a classroom and protect his classmates. Mintz is now recovering from surgery.

“A profound sense of loss.”

Those are the words Washington Governor Jay Inslee used to describe the shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon.

Harborview Hospital, Seattle, 2002
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Ky8e6j

A new federal grant gives Harborview Medical Center a boost in combating gun violence. The U.S. Department of Justice on Friday awarded about $500,000 to organizations in Seattle, including Harborview.

The hospital wants to talk with gunshot victims about the reasons they ended up in the hospital -- sometimes due to gang activity or crime. 

 Grist's Katie Herzog, Crosscut's Knute Berger, KUOW's Bill Radke and Seattle Channel's Joni Balter in the KUOW offices on Friday, Aug. 28, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bellevue High School’s dominant football program is investigated over an alleged “diploma mill.” Gun rights groups sue Seattle over its “gun violence tax.” Has Amazon energized Seattle or ruined it?

Bill Radke reviews the week’s news with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter and Grist’s Katie Herzog.

A jury in Colorado has found Aurora theater shooter James Holmes guilty of first-degree murder in the 2012 mass shooting that killed 12 people and injured 70 others. Holmes could now face the death penalty.

The jury of nine women and three men, who heard nearly three months of testimony in the case, deliberated for a day and a half before arriving at a decision on Thursday.

The verdict comes nearly three years to the day after the mass shooting on July 20, 2012, at the Century Aurora 16 theater.

More than 30 cities and counties in Idaho have changed local laws on firearms or eliminated signage prohibiting guns in public places over the last year. It’s all the result of a systematic effort by one gun-rights group.

home, house, housing: An aerial shot of the Greenwood neighborhood in Seattle, 1969.
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A draft city report pokes at Seattle’s single-family character. Also: Why don’t we rope off the dangerous Big Four Ice Caves in the Cascades? Would a Seattle gun tax infringe on your right to bear arms? And in a super-dry Seattle summer, should you be conserving water, or not?

Bill Radke debates the week’s news with Crosscut's Knute Berger, journalist Tonya Mosley and former state GOP chair Chris Vance.

Each year, convicted felons get thousands of weapons from licensed gun dealers. They skirt the mandatory background checks by having people who do qualify fill out the paperwork for them.

Now, the settlement of a lawsuit over a tragic murder-suicide in Kansas has made it easier to sue gun dealers who allow these "straw purchases" with a wink and a nod.

Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed a bill Monday that will require criminal background checks for anyone who buys a gun from a private party.

A bill that would require criminal background checks for private gun sales in Oregon is on its way to the governor's desk. The Oregon House narrowly passed the measure Monday.

The Tulalip Tribe leaders perform at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014 -- two days after Jaylen Fryberg shot five students and himself in the cafeteria during lunch.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The arrest of a Tulalip man has put a spotlight on possible gaps in the background check system for gun buyers.

The protection order that would have blocked Raymond Fryberg, Jr., from buying a handgun was never entered in a state database. His son later used the gun in the shootings at Marysville-Pilchuck High School.

When James Craig was a young man in the 1970s, he says law-abiding people wouldn't dream of carrying guns. But then he left town to pursue a career in policing. In the years he was gone, Michigan liberalized its gun laws, making it easier for people to get concealed-carry permits.

When he came back to become Detroit's police chief in 2013, he found a whole new reality.

"You would have thought, given the dynamic of people who carry weapons, that we were maybe in Texas," he says. "But in fact, we were in Detroit, Michigan!"

File photo of a gun show.
Flickr Photo/M Glasgow (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with the founder and CEO of the QPR Institute, Paul Quinnett, about the role of guns in rising suicide rates in rural areas. 

Oregon lawmakers are gearing up for another round of debate over firearm regulations.

Robert Robinson listens as Seattle Police Detective D. "Cookie" Bouldin reads a poem at a memorial for his son, Robert Jr.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

The site of Sunday's shooting in Seattle's Beacon Hill neighborhood has turned into a shrine and gathering place for people remembering Robert Robinson, Jr. KUOW's John Ryan reports.

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