guns

Supporters of a Washington gun control measure on the November ballot may have just gotten a mid-summer boost. They’re capitalizing on an audio recording that recently surfaced.

Flickr Photo/Adam Fagen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Michael Waldman about his new book "The Second Amendment: A Biography." Gun control has been a hot topic for years and the debate will play out in Washington this November in the form of two rival initiatives on guns. 

Waldman, president of the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law, says for decades of American history the Second Amendment was a non-issue. 

The Washington Supreme Court ruled Thursday a Washington man whose loaded gun went off in a school backpack critically injuring a student can’t be charged with third-degree assault.

A new Elway Poll out Tuesday shows support for a gun rights measure on Washington’s fall ballot is flagging. Meanwhile, a dueling measure that would expand background checks remains popular.

Seattle City Council / University of Washington

Treat people hospitalized for gunshot injuries as you would treat addicts.

That’s the counsel of Dr. Fred Rivara, a professor of pediatrics, who headed a University of Washington study that found that patients who had been shot were more likely to be arrested within five years than people with a psychiatric history.

Flickr Photot/Sounder Bruce (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle City Light hired an online reputation management firm and now the utility would like its money, and its repuation, back. The State Liquor Control board filed emergency marijuana rules. And why does Seattle love soccer, a sport where losing can end happily?

KUOW's Bill Radke kicks those stories and more around with Joni Balter, Knute Berger and Eli Sanders.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jeffrey Swanson about which public policies are effective in reducing gun violence. Swanson is a professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke University School of Medicine.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

In the wake of recent gun violence, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray said the city faces a crisis of confidence in public safety.

A gun that fires only in the hands of its owner isn't science fiction anymore. A so-called smart gun is already on sale in Europe. But you won't find it on store shelves in this country — in part because of an obscure New Jersey law that's had unintended consequences for the rest of the nation.

Basically, the Childproof Handgun Law of 2002 says that once "personalized handguns are available" anywhere in the country, all handguns sold in New Jersey must be smart guns within 30 months.

One candidate for an eastern Washington congressional seat has hit on a way to appeal to 2nd Amendment advocates and to increase the names on his campaign mailing list.

The U.S. Supreme Court delivered a major victory to gun control advocates on Monday. The 5-4 ruling allows strict enforcement of the federal ban on gun "straw purchases," or one person buying a gun for another.

The federal law on background checks requires federally licensed gun dealers to verify the identity of buyers and submit their names to a federal database to weed out felons, those with a history of mental illness and others barred from gun ownership.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

The man held in the shootings at Seattle Pacific University could go to prison for life.

Aaron Ybarra was charged in Superior Court on Tuesday with one count of first-degree murder, two counts of attempted murder and one count of assault for the shootings last Thursday. If convicted as charged, he could face up to 86 years in prison.

Marcie Sillman talks with Sandi Ando about reforming Washington state's mental health system. Ando is public policy chair for Washington's chapter of the National Alliance On Mental Illness.

Flickr Photo/M Glasgow (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about competing gun ballot initiatives in Washington in light of the recent Seattle Pacific University shooting.

Flickr Photo/M Glasgow (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland about a plan to close the so-called "gun show loophole" by requiring a background check for any gun sold on city property.

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