guns

Ross Reynolds talks with journalist Cyrus Farivar about untraceable, homemade guns. Farivar is senior business editor for the technology website Ars Technica.

According to the latest Elway Poll released Monday, a ballot measure to expand background checks for gun sales in Washington has lost some support, but still enjoys a healthy lead.

The National Rifle Association says it’s “very committed” to defeating a background check measure on Washington’s November ballot.

This November, Washington voters will decide whether to require background checks for person-to-person gun sales.

Flickr Photo/Piskami (CC-BY-NC-ND)

State records reveal that in the past two years, four law enforcement departments in Washington state have been suspended from the military surplus program known as 1033.

The government program issues surplus military gear to state and local municipalities who show a need. Under the program, law enforcement agencies can apply to receive everything from Shop-Vacs to mine-resistant vehicles. All they need to pay is the cost of shipping.

Police in Pocatello, Idaho, are investigating how a university professor accidentally shot himself in the foot during class.

Michael Waldman's book "The Second Amendment: A Biography"

Most Americans don’t question an individual’s right to own a gun, with certain exceptions. But in an age when senseless public shootings make frequent headlines, many question the limits of gun ownership. 

And though a large majority of Americans say they support expanded background checks for gun ownership, Congress can’t come to any agreement on possible legislation.

Supporters of a Washington gun control measure on the November ballot may have just gotten a mid-summer boost. They’re capitalizing on an audio recording that recently surfaced.

Flickr Photo/Adam Fagen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Michael Waldman about his new book "The Second Amendment: A Biography." Gun control has been a hot topic for years and the debate will play out in Washington this November in the form of two rival initiatives on guns. 

Waldman, president of the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law, says for decades of American history the Second Amendment was a non-issue. 

The Washington Supreme Court ruled Thursday a Washington man whose loaded gun went off in a school backpack critically injuring a student can’t be charged with third-degree assault.

A new Elway Poll out Tuesday shows support for a gun rights measure on Washington’s fall ballot is flagging. Meanwhile, a dueling measure that would expand background checks remains popular.

Seattle City Council / University of Washington

Treat people hospitalized for gunshot injuries as you would treat addicts.

That’s the counsel of Dr. Fred Rivara, a professor of pediatrics, who headed a University of Washington study that found that patients who had been shot were more likely to be arrested within five years than people with a psychiatric history.

Flickr Photot/Sounder Bruce (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle City Light hired an online reputation management firm and now the utility would like its money, and its repuation, back. The State Liquor Control board filed emergency marijuana rules. And why does Seattle love soccer, a sport where losing can end happily?

KUOW's Bill Radke kicks those stories and more around with Joni Balter, Knute Berger and Eli Sanders.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jeffrey Swanson about which public policies are effective in reducing gun violence. Swanson is a professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke University School of Medicine.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

In the wake of recent gun violence, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray said the city faces a crisis of confidence in public safety.

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