guns

In this Jan. 26, 2015, file photo, Scott Smith, a supporter of open carry gun laws, wears a pistol as he prepares for a rally in support of open carry gun laws at the Capitol, in Austin, Texas.
AP Photo/Eric Gay, File

Bill Radke speaks with Joanna Paul, of the Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility, and Dave Workman with the Second Amendment Foundation, about their reaction to President Obama's executive action on gun control. 

President Obama announced executive actions Tuesday, intended to curtail gun violence. But if history is any guide, the president's effort may have the unintended effect of boosting gun sales — 2015 was a banner year.

Saying that America faces a "gun violence epidemic," President Obama is taking "a series of common-sense executive actions" to reduce gun violence Tuesday, the White House says. First among the measures: tighter rules on background checks for gun buyers.

President Obama is announcing a series of executive actions intended to combat gun violence, including a regulatory change designed to make it harder for gun buyers to avoid background checks. Obama plans to detail the moves on Tuesday with a statement in the White House East Room.

Four percent more law enforcement officers at the federal state, territorial and local levels died in the line of duty in 2015 than in 2014, according to a preliminary report from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund.

But despite several high-profile shootings of police in 2015, the group also says more officers died in traffic-related events (52) than from gunfire (42).

A grand jury has declined to bring criminal charges against two Cleveland police officers involved in the fatal shooting of 12-year old Tamir Rice.

"Simply put, given this perfect storm of human error, mistakes and miscommunications by all involved that day, the evidence did not indicate criminal conduct by police," Cuyahoga County prosecutor Timothy McGinty told reporters.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Seattle’s tax on every gun and bullet sold in the city can stay, a King County Superior Court judge said Tuesday.

Judge Palmer Robinson denied a request by firearms advocates for an injunction against the measure. Approved by the City Council in August, it requires dealers to pay $25 for every gun sold and up to 5 cents for every round of ammunition sold.

Washington’s voter-approved background check law for private gun sales has been in effect for a year. But so far there’ve been no reports of arrests or prosecutions.

'Week in Review' panel Melanie McFarland, Dan Savage, Rob McKenna and KUOW's Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Was the UW women’s crew coach inspiring his athletes, psychologically abusing them,  or something in between? Also, how do we honor American history when it wasn’t always honorable? And, we all react to shooting after shooting after shooting.

Bill Radke’s guests inclue Stranger editorial director Dan Savage, former Washington Attorney General Rob McKenna, and McTelevision’s Melanie McFarland; plus Seattle Times sportswriter Geoff Baker.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

“Crazy.” “Frustrated.” “Cynical.” “Disgusted. It makes me embarrassed to be a human being.”

Those are some KUOW listener responses to the mass shooting that left 14 people dead in San Bernardino, California. Friday on KUOW's Week in Review, Bill Radke talked to Dan Savage of The Stranger, journalist and TV critic Melanie McFarland and former state Attorney General Rob McKenna about gun control in the aftermath.

With two deadly mass shootings in California and Colorado in the past week, this country is again in a fierce debate over gun control.

After the massacre in San Bernardino, President Obama encouraged states to take the lead on preventing gun violence. Both California and Colorado have responded to mass shootings recently by passing tougher gun laws.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Bill Radke talks to Geoff Potter from the Washington Alliance For Gun Responsibility about how universal background checks have been working in Washington state since the passage of I-594 last year. 

The shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., was the 355th mass shooting in the U.S. this year — or more than one per day on average so far in 2015 — according to groups monitoring such attacks in recent years.

As yet another mass shooting claimed the lives of 14 people Wednesday in San Bernardino, Calif., a familiar refrain echoed from the lips of politicians: Pray.

But for many fed up with the now seemingly routine shootings and the resulting inaction from each over how to stop another tragedy, pleas to God weren't enough anymore.

Two suspects died in a gun fight with police after a mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., on Wednesday. The attack at a county employee holiday party at the Inland Regional Center left 14 people dead and 17 others wounded.

San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan said Syed Farook, 28, an American citizen, and Tashfeen Malik, 27, were killed when police chased the suspects' SUV and exchanged fire.

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