There is a pistol-packing revolution going on in America. Nearly 13 million Americans have permits to carry concealed handguns — triple the number just nine years ago — and that figure is low because not every state reports.

Every year, U.S. hospitals treat hundreds of thousands of violent injuries. Often, the injured are patched up and sent home, right back to the troubles that landed them in the hospital in the first place.

Now, as these institutions of healing are facing pressure under the Affordable Care Act to keep readmissions down, a growing number of hospitals are looking at ways to prevent violence. In Baltimore, health department workers have pitched hospitals an idea they want to take citywide.

In this Jan. 26, 2015, file photo, Scott Smith, a supporter of open carry gun laws, wears a pistol as he prepares for a rally in support of open carry gun laws at the Capitol, in Austin, Texas.
AP Photo/Eric Gay, File

Bill Radke talks with Spokane blogger Jim Ryan about why he started a satirical online petition to allow people to openly carry firearms at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this July.

Fifty private gun sales have been blocked since Washington voters approved a background check law in 2014. That’s according to FBI data released in response to a public records request by public radio and KING-TV in Seattle.

Adding guns to the world of the Brothers Grimm drastically reduces death rates, according to a study — well, OK, according to a couple of stories published by the NRA.

So far, there are only two data points. And they're imaginary. But the trendline is clear: In the NRA's reimagined fairy tales, putting rifles in the hands of children creates a safer world.

King County's Board of Health is pushing for better enforcement of gun confiscation laws.

In Washington, people subject to restraining orders can be required to surrender their guns. Those cases often involve domestic violence. Law enforcement agencies are supposed to have a process to collect the firearms.

But the Board of Health says that in King County it's not always done effectively, and that causes a public health risk.

Gun buyers in Oregon could have to wait longer to get a weapon if there's a delay in processing their criminal background check. The Oregon House narrowly approved the measure Monday.

File photo of a hand gun.
Flickr Photo/Zorin Denu (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with Stephanie Ervin, campaign manager for a statewide initiative campaign that would allow a person to petition a court for an extreme risk protection order which would have a family member's firearms temporarily taken away and prevent that person from purchasing new guns.

Editor's Note: Some may find the graphic material in this post disturbing.

"I remember taking the gun out," says Sean Smith. "My sister was off to the side of the room."

Smith, now 36, was just 10 years old at the time. He had arrived home after school with his 8-year-old sister, Erin. Their parents weren't home yet, so they'd gone searching for hidden video games in their father's dresser drawer.

That's when Sean Smith found a .38 revolver.

Oregon lawmakers are considering a measure that would close what some activists call a "loophole" in the state's criminal background check law. It allows gun sales to go through if a background check isn't completed by the end of the next business day.

For the past two years, Joseph Richardson has been trying to figure out how to keep young black men with knife and gunshot wounds from turning up again with similar injuries at Prince George's Hospital Trauma Center outside Washington, D.C.

You’ve heard of sex offender registries. The state of Washington also has a registry for people convicted of gun-related felonies. But it’s hardly used.

Here's one topic Americans can bank on hearing about in next week's State of the Union address: gun control. The reaction to President Obama's announced gun-control measures this week was swift and entirely as expected. Gun-control advocates and many Democrats applauded his efforts; gun-rights groups and many Republicans loudly denounced the orders as executive overreach.

'Week in Review' panel Joni Balter, Matt Manweller, Debora Juarez and KUOW's Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

What should happen to the armed group occupying Oregon's Malheur Wildlife Refuge? What’s the right compromise on guns? When it comes to public bathrooms, who defines your identity? And how do we know Seattle is losing its soul if we can't say what soul is?

Bill Radke attempts soulful clarity with Seattle City Councilmember Debora Juarez (District 5), Seattle Channel's Joni Balter and state Rep. Matt Manweller (R-Ellensburg).

Daniel LeClair/Reuters

A few days after Sandy Hook, Attorney General Eric Holder traveled to the site of the mass shooting, spoke with first responders and looked at the pictures.

“I was crying. It was without question the worst day that I had as attorney general, and maybe the worst day in my professional life,” Holder said.