guns

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Updated 9:00 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 26

The scene was surreal and all too familiar.

Students sprinting across school fields with hands above their heads. 

Police officers, guns drawn, moving from building to building, looking for another possible shooter. 

Cell towers overwhelmed by messages from frantic students. Terrified parents crowding the hospital waiting room to hear if their kid made it out alive. 

Flickr Photo/Adam Fagen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with UCLA law professor Adam Winkler, author of, "Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right To Bear Arms in America," about privacy concerns with background check bills. Also, we hear from Alan Gottlieb with Protect Our Gun Rights.

How The Gun Debate Plays Out In Faith

Oct 22, 2014
KUOW Photo/Ryan Katz

Charles Stephens performed opera in New York City for 20 years. He sang with the Seattle Symphony on opening night. But Stephens says that doesn’t compare to the concert he recently directed last month.

Flickr Photo/M Glasgow (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Stan Goldman, law professor at Loyola Law School, about how gun laws and gun culture compare in California and Washington state.

For more KUOW elections coverage, visit the Election Connection page.  

Checking Your 'Intuition' At The Gun Show

Oct 21, 2014
KUOW Photo/Ryan Katz

George Brewholmes has been collecting firearms since he was eight years old. He worked in a pawnshop, where he would stock and sell several different types of guns. His boss bought him his first pistol, an old Iver Johnson from around the turn of the century.

591 Or 594? Former Cops Differ On Gun Control

Oct 20, 2014

Ross Reynolds talks with two former law enforcement officials on opposite sides of this fall's gun ballot measures. 

Don Pierce is a former Bellingham police chief and the former executive director of the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs. He supports 594, which calls for stricter background checks. 

William Burris is a retired detective and spokesman for the Washington State Law Enforcement Firearms Instructors Association. He supports Initiative 591, which would limit the restrictions the state can place on gun ownership.

KUOW Photo/Austin Jenkins

Washington’s upcoming vote on gun laws is being closely watched around the country.

It’s the first time a state has presented voters with two competing initiatives on gun regulations – one to require universal background checks and the other to prevent them. It’s also marked a new surge in campaign donations to regulate gun sales in Washington state. Advocates for background checks call the donations “a sea change” that could have ripple effects in other states.

In rural parts of the Northwest, many believe owning a gun is sort of like owning a garden trowel. You just have one or two around.

Ross Reynolds talks with journalist Cyrus Farivar about untraceable, homemade guns. Farivar is senior business editor for the technology website Ars Technica.

According to the latest Elway Poll released Monday, a ballot measure to expand background checks for gun sales in Washington has lost some support, but still enjoys a healthy lead.

The National Rifle Association says it’s “very committed” to defeating a background check measure on Washington’s November ballot.

This November, Washington voters will decide whether to require background checks for person-to-person gun sales.

Flickr Photo/Piskami (CC-BY-NC-ND)

State records reveal that in the past two years, four law enforcement departments in Washington state have been suspended from the military surplus program known as 1033.

The government program issues surplus military gear to state and local municipalities who show a need. Under the program, law enforcement agencies can apply to receive everything from Shop-Vacs to mine-resistant vehicles. All they need to pay is the cost of shipping.

Police in Pocatello, Idaho, are investigating how a university professor accidentally shot himself in the foot during class.

Michael Waldman's book "The Second Amendment: A Biography"

Most Americans don’t question an individual’s right to own a gun, with certain exceptions. But in an age when senseless public shootings make frequent headlines, many question the limits of gun ownership. 

And though a large majority of Americans say they support expanded background checks for gun ownership, Congress can’t come to any agreement on possible legislation.

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