guns

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Jeannie Yandel sits down with security professional Scott McArthur to discuss the rise of threat assessment teams across the county that work to intervene and prevent violent incidents like mass shootings. McArthur is president of the Northwest chapter of the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals. 

Two years ago, Washington lawmakers created a registry for individuals convicted of a gun-related felony. The law was sold as a way to improve police officer safety by creating a database just for them.

People in Coos County, Oregon, are considering an initiative that would block enforcement of new gun laws. The question goes before voters in a special election next month.

As the debate over gun ownership and gun control is renewed following the shooting deaths of nine people, including the gunman, at an Oregon community college earlier this month, there's the voice of an evangelical leader whose views might be different from what some would expect.

Updated -- Protesters and supporters greeted President Barack Obama during his visit to Roseburg, Oregon. The President touched down in Marine One Friday afternoon to meet with families of the victims of last week's shooting at Umpqua Community College.

Officials at Northern Arizona University say a suspect is in custody following a shooting at the campus of the Flagstaff school in the early hours of Friday morning. One person was killed; three other victims are in the hospital.

"The first call of shots fired came in at 1:20 a.m.," the school says via Facebook. It adds that the campus is not on lockdown.

All of the victims are students; some were shot multiple times, police say.

Update at 9:30 a.m. ET: Fraternity Says Its Members Were Involved

After the mass shooting in Roseburg, Ore., last week, the national media gave a lot of attention to the fact that the local sheriff, John Hanlin, is an ardent supporter of gun rights. He'd written a letter to Vice President Joe Biden shortly after the Dec. 14, 2012, massacre of schoolchildren at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., saying gun control was not the answer. In the letter, Hanlin pledged not to enforce gun regulations he believed to be unconstitutional.

What wasn't widely reported was how common views like Hanlin's have become in law enforcement.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

More mental health treatment and gun control won't necessarily prevent mass shootings, but a new California law might help, says a public health researcher.

Flowers at a memorial for the 2014 Seattle Pacific University shooting.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Jeannie Yandel talks with Seattle Pacific University student Chris Howard about his experience dealing with the aftermath of the 2014 shooting at SPU in light of the recent school shooting at Umpqua Community College in  Roseburg, Oregon.

We want to cut through the spin with a new feature we're calling "Break It Down."

Break It Down is going to be a regular part of our campaign coverage. We're going to try some new things. It might read a little differently from time to time. But our goal is to zoom in on what the candidates are saying, and give you the factual breakdown you need to make a sound judgment.

It's hard to deny that the NRA has won the gun debate over the past 20 years.

Despite mass shootings — and despite some 80 to 90 percent of Americans saying they are in favor of background checks — no legislation expanding on the 1993 Brady Bill has passed Congress.

What's going on? Well, the debate over guns is hardly ever solely about background checks or other seemingly popular measures intended to curb gun violence.

Lacey Scroggins was in a writing class last week at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Ore., when a man burst in and started shooting people. When it was over, 10 people, including the shooter, were dead, and Lacey was covered in blood.

She survived, and she and her family credit one of the victims for that. She wasn't ready to tell the tale herself, so she asked her father to stand in.

Some southwest Oregon gun owners say they're worried that the shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg will spur lawmakers to pass more gun laws.

Community members gather for a candlelight vigil for those killed in a shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Ore., Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015.
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

We'll bring you the latest on investigations into the Roseburg, Oregon, shooting and last week's fatal Aurora Bridge crash. Plus: Shell’s Arctic oil abandonment as seen from the Aleutian Islands. Where did all the I-405 drivers go? And now that the Seattle Mariners have named Jerry Dipoto as their new general manager, will they finally put the right pretty Lego castle pieces in place and leave them there?

Bill Radke figures out the week’s news with former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn, journalist Erica C. Barnett, former state lawmaker Bill Finkbeiner, KUOW’s John Ryan reporting from Alaska, Seattle Times reporters Lewis Kamb and Geoff Baker, Northwest News Networks’s Chris Lehman and WSDOT tolling director Craig Stone.

After Thursday's mass shooting at an Oregon community college, which left nine people dead and more injured, President Obama aired his frustration over gun laws in the U.S. At a news conference Friday, he called on voters to push their representatives to take action.

"You just have to, for a while, be a single-issue voter, because that's what is happening on the other side," Obama said. "And that's going to take some time. I mean, the NRA has had a good start."

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