guns

Several hundred gun rights activists rallied at Washington’s capitol Saturday to protest the new voter-approved law that requires background checks for person-to-person gun sales and transfers. Most participants in the "I Will Not Comply" rally were openly carrying handguns or rifles or both.

The state of Washington is preparing for as many as 6,000 gun-rights advocates to attend a rally at the Capitol on Saturday.

For the first time in at least 20 years, significantly more Americans say it's more important to protect the right to own guns than to control gun ownership, according to the Pew Research Center.

The survey found that more than half of Americans (52 percent) sided with gun rights compared with the 46 percent who favored gun control.

The findings represent the continuation of a shift that was only briefly interrupted by the Newtown, Conn., school shootings in 2012.

Amy Radil

Initiative 594 took effect Thursday, and Washington joined six other states with the broadest background checks for gun sales. Cheryl Stumbo and other members of the Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility marked the date with a press conference at Plymouth Church in downtown Seattle.

“Initiative 594 is in effect, and today Washington has closed the background check loophole,” Stumbo said as members applauded.

File photo.
Flickr Photo/Wendy (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Ivan Moreno, reporter for the Associated Press in Colorado, about the how their universal background check law went into effect last year. Washington state's passed a similar law in November.

Washington’s new background check law for person-to-person gun sales and transfers takes effect Thursday.

Beloved sandwhich shop Paseo closed suddenly this week, leading to a lot of foodie grief in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Rocky Yeh (CC-BY-NC-ND

A beloved Cuban sandwich shop falls apart. A gun-rights rally is coming to Olympia. Should police bother to find who broke into your car? Is our lieutenant governor a slacker? And what would you put into a Washington state time capsule?

Bill Radke is with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Northwest News Network’s Phyllis Fletcher and LiveWire’s Luke Burbank to answer these questions.

A Winchester Safes representative sets the lock on one of several gun safes on display at the 35th annual SHOT Show, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013, in Las Vegas.
AP Photo/Julie Jacobson

Ross Reynolds talks to Rep. Jay Rodne (R- 5th District) about Rep. Ruth Kagi's gun bill regarding child access to guns. It would make a person guilty of reckless endangerment for leaving or storing a loaded gun in a place where a child could gain access to it.  

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A fourth victim has died of his injuries from the Marysville-Pilchuck High School shooting.

Andrew Fryberg, 15, died of a gunshot wound to the head on Friday evening, according to Harborview Medical Center – exactly two weeks after the Oct. 24 shooting.

Flickr Photo/Ray Dehler (CC BY 2.0)

For two years, Democratic Rep. Ruth Kagi has been unsuccessful in sending her bill regarding child gun access prevention to the floor of the Washington Legislature.

With the passing of the background check initiative and the school shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School, she has more hope for the 2015 session.

Washington’s Initiative 594 requires universal background checks for gun purchases and transfers, including private and online sales. 

Initial election results indicate passage is likely, and backers say they are energized by the presumed victory. The opposing measure to bar expanded background checks, Initiative 591, has fallen short of passing so far.

Picture of a sculpture at the United Nations headquarters in New York City taken in 2010.
Flickr Photo/Sari Dennise (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Duke University political science professor Kristin Goss about what Washington's passage of universal background checks mean for the national conversation about guns.

Olympia Washington State Legislature
Flickr Photo/Harvey Barrison (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about expanded background checks for gun sales and the changed balance of power in the state legislature.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Sole Repair, a cozy venue on Capitol Hill, erupted in cheers on Tuesday night when the child care results came in – a whopping 67 percent supporting the initiative to expand child care subsidies in the city.

Washington voters have overwhelmingly approved a ballot measure to expand background checks for person-to-person gun sales and transfers.

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