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Edmonds City Council President Mike Nelson demonstrates how he uses a safe for his pistol.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

The city of Edmonds could soon fine people who don't lock up their firearms.

The ordinance is being proposed by a gun owner.

A major change that aims to keep more weapons out of the wrong hands is in the works for the FBI's gun background check process.

Examiners will be given access to a large, previously untapped database of more than 400 million records as they determine when gun purchases can go through nationwide. But for the survivors and victims' families of the 2015 church massacre in Charleston, S.C., the change did not come soon enough.

Jesse Pettibone, 23, center, marches on Saturday, March 24, 2018, during March For Our Lives in Seattle. youth, queer people and people of color are often the victims of gun violence and we need to disarm that hate now," Pettibone said.
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

Soon, Seattleites who leave their guns lying around will be breaking the law. 

On Monday, the Seattle City Council approved an ordinance that requires people in Seattle to store their firearms in a locked container.


With the window for submitting signatures closing fast, backers of a ban on semi-automatic, military-style weapons in Oregon might finally win permission to begin petitioning voters this week.

Police block the scene outside a Walmart in Tumwater where a gunman shot a driver, then was himself shot to death on Sunday afternoon.
KUOW photo/Austin Jenkins

A shooting spree in Tumwater ended in a sun-drenched Walmart parking lot when an armed civilian shot the suspected gunman to death, police said Sunday evening.

Three people were hurt: a teenage boy with minor injuries, another person with minor injuries, and a man who was airlifted to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. He is now in critical condition, Harborview spokeswoman Susan Gregg said.

Three months ago the students from South Florida established themselves as a potent force in the gun debate with the March For Our Lives rally. This summer they're hitting the road with a new mission: turn the wave of young activism they helped spark into an energized voting bloc for the November mid-term elections.

At the annual end-of-year peace march in Chicago, organized by St. Sabina Catholic Church, Grammy-winners Chance the Rapper and Jennifer Hudson, along with former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, joined the Parkland survivors to launch a bus tour called Road to Change.

Courtesy of Jacob Wesley Sutton

In the wake of school shootings like the one in Parkland, Florida this year, parents are asking: "How do I talk to my child about mass shootings?"

KUOW helped answer that question with a story we did in March.


Savannah Blackwell, a freshman, performs a song during an assembly on Friday, June 8, 2018, at Franklin High School in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Last Friday was the last time Ryan Dela Cruz's classmates saw the 17-year-old student alive.

In the aftermath of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 students and staff dead, the state of Washington established a “work group” on mass shootings. It will hold its third meeting on Tuesday.

Rhiannon Rasaretnam scribbles notes for her speech for Seattle's March for Our Lives before she goes on stage.
KUOW PHOTO/ALIYAH MUSALIAR

In March, thousands of students took to the streets of Seattle to protest gun violence. March for Our Lives was organized by everyday high school students who aren't Nobel Peace Prize winners like Malala. My friend, Rhiannon Rasaretnam, is one of them. 

When I saw Rhiannon behind the stage, seconds before giving a final call for action at Seattle's March for Our Lives, she was hastily finishing up her speech.


Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan announced her plan to seek safe storage legislation in March at Harborview Medical Center.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Gun owners who don’t store their guns securely could face new civil penalties under legislation unveiled Thursday by Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan. Durkan said the goal is to reduce gun deaths including accidents and suicides.


This map shows the gun deaths of children and adolescents in King County between 2009 and 2018.
KUOW/Google Fusion Tables

Look at the map above. What do you notice?

Each red dot represents someone 18 or younger who died of a gunshot wound in King County in the last nine years.

Flickr Photo/Michael Saechang (CC BY-SA-2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9RtCyW

They're not the biggest political contributions in the state's history, but they're up there.

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen says he has written a million-dollar check for a gun-control initiative.

And Seattle venture capitalist Nick Hanauer says he's doing the same.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson is breaking with tradition and will endorse a ballot measure dealing with guns. 

Brian Davison, a Commissioner in Kitsap County, stands on the steps of the Legislative Building on Saturday, April 21, 2018, during a March For Our Rights pro gun rally at the Washington state capitol, in Olympia.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Over 1,000 people were estimated to be in attendance on Saturday afternoon for a "March For Our Rights" pro-gun rally on the steps of the Washington state capitol. 

Saying they want to keep up the pressure on elected officials to pass new gun control measures, Seattle-area students joined a national school walkout on the 19th anniversary of the shooting at Columbine High School.

But they said Friday’s gathering was intended to shine a light on gun violence in the U.S. beyond shootings on school grounds. 

At schools across the country today, students are getting up from their desks and walking out when the clock strikes 10 a.m. They're participating in the National School Walkout, part of the movement that has taken hold among students to call for action to end gun violence.

Today marks 19 years since the shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in which two high school students shot and killed thirteen people.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is stepping up his role as chair of the Democratic Governors Association. Inslee was in Las Vegas Thursday as part of his first major campaign swing.

Gun owner Rick Vadnais high-fives with Basilia Brownwell during their conversation at the 'Ask A Gun Owner' event at the Hillman City Collaboratory on March 31.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

The gun control debate has become a polarizing experience for many Americans. It’s unusual to hear civil discussions between the opposing sides.

The KUOW “Ask A…” series brought together gun owners and non-gun owners on March 31 to share their points of view at the Hillman City Collaboratory. Sonya Harris talked to some of them about those conversations.


Sharyn Hinchcliffe and Beatrice Cappio at KUOW's 'Ask a Gun Owner' event on March 31, 2018.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

A couple of weeks ago, a fire alarm went off at Beatrice Cappio’s high school.

“Everyone stopped to wonder, well, is there a shooter in the hall? Is it really an evacuation, should we really leave?” Cappio said.

At work, Jim Skorpik's nickname is a handle better known for missiles: "Hellfire."

As a longtime federal electrical engineer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Wash., he's developed sensors to track missiles' readiness for battle that measure heat or impacts that could damage them.

Lately, Skorpik has turned his know-how to schools.

3 Reasons Gun Companies Are Under Pressure

Mar 27, 2018

Remington Arms Co., an American gun company with roots stretching back over 200 years, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Saddled with almost $1 billion in debt and a victim of shifting market trends, Remington, like many other gun companies, faces a constant uphill battle wrought with political pressures and changing sentiments on gun ownership. Here are three reasons why gun companies are now struggling to find profits.

Courtesy of Jamie Rand Imaging/Jamie Colman

This past weekend, students in hundreds of cities and towns around the country joined in March For Our Lives  "sibling marches." Before the March For Our Lives Seattle event, students and supporters gathered to hear speeches.

Gregory Pleasant, 17, center, and Elijah Lewis, 18, right, raise their fists in the air before the start of March For Our Lives Seattle on Saturday, March 24, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

It was a great awakening – thousands of people, many of them teens and preteens, marched through Seattle on Saturday morning. They joined tens of thousands more across the country calling for laws that would curb gun violence.

Reilly Donham, 18, of Mill Creek, Washington, attends the 'March for Our Lives' rally in Seattle on Saturday morning.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

We are at the 'March for Our Lives' in Seattle this morning where 50,000 students and their families are expected to rally. We will update this post as the march progresses.

I survived the Las Vegas shooting

Mar 23, 2018
Ginny Winslow photographed at her Seattle home on Friday, March 23, 2018. Winslow was working at the Route 91 Harvest music festival when Stephen Paddock fired on concertgoers from the nearby Mandalay Bay hotel, leaving 58 people dead.
Dan DeLong for KUOW

I was working in Las Vegas at the Route 91 Harvest Festival. I looked at Caslin, my coworker, both of us confused but wary. She said, "It’s fireworks."

"No," I said.

"Or a car starting," she said.

"That's a gun," I said. I know that popping sound.

University Prep students attend a walkout rally on Wednesday, March 14, 2018, at Red Square on the University of Washington campus in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Student organizers say Saturday’s March For Our Lives rally in Seattle will emphasize voter registration and concrete steps young people can take to advocate against gun violence.

Hundreds of thousands will call for stricter gun control measures at "March For Our Lives" rallies across the country on Saturday.

But in Montana's state Capitol, counterprotesters are organizing a "March For Our Guns."

"I love our Second Amendment rights," 18-year-old Joey Chester says. "I don't want to see those restricted for law-abiding citizens."

"March For Our Lives" was organized by students after the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. It follows a countrywide student walkout earlier this month.

Stephen Paddock, the man who rained bullets down on a crowd of concertgoers last October, killing 58 people, appears in newly released surveillance video to be an ordinary hotel guest and casino patron in the days leading to the massacre.

Dr. Fred Rivara demonstrated how quickly a lockbox can be opened to give access to guns stored there.
KUOW/Amy Radil

Washington state law generally prohibits local governments from overstepping state gun regulations. But Seattle officials say there are still measures they can take to curb gun violence.

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