guns

David Combs' anti-1491 effort doesn't have an office, he does media interviews in the lobby of his condo in Redmond.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Of the initiatives on the November ballot in Washington, a proposed gun regulation has raised the most money. And no one has registered to oppose the measure, but that might be about to change.

A ban on military-style weapons could come to Washington. Wednesday, Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson announced he'll propose a ban during the upcoming legislative session.


When a young African-American man dies in the city of Philadelphia, more than half the time there's one main reason why, says Scott Charles.

"It's because somebody pointed a gun at him and pulled that trigger. It's not because of cancer; it's not because of car accidents; it's not because of house fires. It's because somebody pointed a trigger," he says.

AR-15 rifle with a Stag lower receiver California legal (only with fixed 10-round magazine)
Wikimedia Commons

The day after the Orlando nightclub shooting, Tami Michaels, a Seattle talk show host, took to Facebook.

The University of Texas dedicated a memorial to victims of a sniper-style attack there 50 years ago on the same day concealed-carry of handguns became legal at Texas public universities.

In an early afternoon ceremony, Gregory Fenves, the university's president, dedicated a granite monument containing the names of 17 people killed by Charles Whitman, a 25-year-old student and former Marine, who opened fire from the school's clocktower on Aug. 1, 1966. He killed people both on campus and elsewhere that day.

It's still summer and school's still out for most people, so it's understandable if you're not thinking about the flu. But we all will be soon. Your pharmacist, your doctor, your boss, maybe even your colleagues — they'll all be pushing you to get that annual flu shot, as well they should. Flu is serious business; it causes thousands of hospitalizations each year.

Bill Radke talks with Everett Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield about a new push for state lawmakers to pass an assault weapons ban in Washington.

A coalition of groups and lawmakers in Washington state is calling for a statewide ban on the sale of military-style assault weapons, the type of gun used in recent mass shootings in Dallas, Tex., Orlando, Fla., Roseburg, Ore., and San Bernardino, Cal.

The recent targeted attacks on police in Dallas and Baton Rouge have law enforcement on edge. Some departments are telling officers to patrol in pairs when possible, and to be extra vigilant about possible ambush.

Complicating matters is the question of how to interpret and react to the presence of a gun. With more Americans now exercising their legal right to carry firearms, police find themselves having to make rapid judgments about whether an armed citizen is a threat.

Montrell Jackson, one of three Baton Rouge police officers killed Sunday, had written about tensions he felt following the police killing of Alton Sterling earlier this month, using a Facebook post to tell his community, "Please don't let hate infect your heart."

John O'Brien

As Representative Jim McDermott prepares to retire after 28 years of service, the top three contenders for his 7th District seat in Congress are on the stump to succeed him. 


Initiative 1491 would allow courts to temporarily ban a person from possessing a gun, if that person is deemed a danger to themselves or others. It's called an Extreme Risk Protection Order, and family members or law enforcement would be able to request it from a judge.

Backers of a gun-violence prevention measure say they have turned in enough signatures to qualify the measure for Washington's ballot. 

Mayor Ed Murray and Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole address the social consequences of systematic racism at a press conference.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle’s mayor and police chief held a news conference this afternoon to appeal for calm and for dialogue following the shootings of police officers in Dallas and the shootings of African-American men by police. KUOW’s Carolyn Adolph sends this report.

Oregon voters may get the chance to ban the sale of items made from certain wildlife species this November. Backers of an initiative that would do just that submitted signatures Thursday in an attempt to get their measure on the November ballot.

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