government

A White House administration official confirms that the United States and Cuba have come to an agreement to formally re-establish diplomatic relations and open embassies in Havana and Washington.

The Obama administration will announce the agreement on Wednesday.

As NPR's Krishnadev Calamur has explained, the U.S. imposed sanctions and then broke off diplomatic relations with Fidel Castro's communist regime in the early 1960s.

Wildfire season in the Northwest has started early this year. Crews are battling the Buckskin Fire right now.

Scientists refer to the Buckskin as a “reburn” because it’s on land that was scorched by wildfire in the recent past. These reburns are a positive indication that the forests are recovering from decades of fire suppression.

Monday's Supreme Court decision to reject the Environmental Protection Agency's air pollution rules won't have any immediate effect on Northwest power plants, and its long-term effects are still unclear.

The court ruled the EPA should have considered the cost of mercury and toxic air pollution limits earlier in the regulatory process. With that, the judges sent the rule back to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for review.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee will sign a new two-year budget into law Tuesday, just in time to avert a partial government shutdown.

Hannah Webb, a resident of Seattle's Tent City 3 in Feb. 2015 on the campus of Seattle Pacific University
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sola Plumacher of Seattle's Human Services Department about the city's three new proposed sites for city-sponsored tent cities.

Homeless encampment along a road in the Sodo area of Seattle.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

There could soon be new homeless camps in Seattle.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's administration has picked three sites and plans to send them to the City Council for review.

John and Linda Beatty of Seattle watch Foss Maritime tugs pull the Polar Pioneer oil rig south past Discovery Park toward the Port of Seattle's Terminal 5 on May 14, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

The Shell oil rig that occupied a terminal at the Port of Seattle is gone now.

But its legacy lives on, as candidates for the Port of Seattle Commission square off about the port’s future. An all-candidates meeting was held Monday night. 

Oregon shoppers and bottled water will remain untaxed in Washington’s next two-year budget, but a couple of other tax exemptions will be eliminated.

This post has been updated to reflect Christie officially getting in the race for president.

An agency of the federal government will have to stop doing business today. That's because members of Congress went home last week for the July Fourth recess without reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank.

The bank helps American companies sell their goods overseas. The bank's critics say they're stopping corporate welfare.

Washington’s gas tax would go up nearly 12 cents per gallon to fund road projects under a deal struck between Democrats and Republicans.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jeremy Bradford, an early participant in Seattle's Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion Program, about his journey from a homeless addict to a small business owner.

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the budget deal and whether or not we'll avoid a state shutdown.

"It was Greek to me."

Shakespeare used that phrase in one of his tragedies to suggest that a complicated matter was beyond understanding.

Many Americans may be muttering those words again as this week's Greek tragedy plays out.

The situation in Athens really is complicated, but it's also important. So let's walk through the basics together, and then consider what it might mean to Americans.

Here's what has happened so far:

-- The Greek government has way too much debt and can't pay its creditors.

With a third special session underway, the Washington House and Senate plan to vote sometime Monday on a two-year budget.

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