Washington's capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC BY NC ND)/

Ross Reynolds talks to journalist Kyung Song about a new report by the Center for Public Integrity that gave Washington state poor marks for government accountability.

Cannabis City opened on July 9. At the time it was the only store able to open -- others faced obstacles including distance between them and schools.
KUOW Photo/Michael Clinard

The Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board is accepting a second wave of applications for new marijuana retail licenses.

Gone are the quotas and lotteries used in the first round of licensing. Now there are no limits on the number of licenses that may be granted – a change that took some cities by surprise.

Marion County Circuit Court Judge Vance Day faces an inquiry into a wide range of misconduct allegations. Day will face the Oregon Commission on Judicial Fitness and Disability starting Monday morning.

A staffing shortage at Western State Hospital has created a crisis situation. Federal inspectors this week determined that patients and staff face immediate risk for harm.

Did Tim Eyman win at the ballot box only to lose again in court? Is homelessness an emergency in the city? Will Move Seattle actually move Seattle? And who will save our gum wall?

Bill Radke chews the news with Mike McGinn, Rob McKenna and Joni Balter.

The U.S. Supreme Court justices said Friday they would hear a group of cases brought by religious hospitals, schools, and charities that object to the system devised under Obamacare to spare them from paying for birth control coverage for their employees and students.

NPR's Nina Totenberg reports:

There’s a surprise newcomer to the campaign for a higher minimum wage in Washington. It’s the state’s restaurant association.

Tim Eyman
AP Photo/Rachel La Corte

Tim Eyman's latest tax-reducing intitiative, I-1366, passed handily in Tuesday's election.

Eyman talked to David Hyde about why he thought the initiative was necessary and about how he feels to get the victory while he's under investigation over allegations of campaign finance violations.

Prison jail bars
Flickr Photo/Thomas Hawk (CC BY NC 2.0)/

The United States imprisons more people than any other country in the world. But that’s a relatively recent development. Over the last three decades rates of incarceration in the U.S. have increased five-fold.

Currently there are about 2.2 million U.S. citizens behind bars. Race and class are major factors in who goes to prison. If current trends continue, 1 in 3 young black men will spend time behind bars. The projected rate for young white men is 1 in 22.

Seattle Public Library central branch, 1914 (not the first iteration - that was in 1898 on the fifth floor of the Occidental Building in Pioneer Square).
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC BY 2.0)/

David Hyde travels back in time through the magic of radio with writer Knute Berger to the site of Seattle's first library.  

Washington’s Special Commitment Center on McNeil Island is home to 252 sex offenders. These are men -- and one woman -- who’ve completed their prison sentences but are deemed too dangerous to release.

Timothy McCall works in WSDOT's new $17.3 million Northwest Region Transportation Management Center in Shoreline.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Washington has a new Transportation Management Center in Shoreline. That’s the nerve center where engineers help resolve traffic problems.

Before officials showed me the new center, they showed me the building they used to work out of. It looks like an underground missile control bunker from the Cold War era.

Cleaning up the central part of the Hanford nuclear reservation will take even longer. That’s the bottom line of a series of regional public comment meetings kicking off Wednesday in Richland, Washington.

In September, the U.S. Marine Corps released a four-page summary of a yearlong study that found that all-male units were faster, more lethal and able to evacuate casualties in less time than mixed-gender units. The study, which can be viewed in full below, was bashed by critics for being biased.

NPR was able to independently obtain the full 978-page Marine Corps study. Several key findings are below.

Washington voters appear to have given the thumbs up to another Tim Eyman tax-limiting measure. But the courts could get the final say.