government

Washington Republicans say the way state employees collectively bargain pay and benefits is not transparent and presents a conflict of interest.

Osman Mohamed outside his apartment complex in Federal Way.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Kim Malcolm speaks with Nicky Smith, executive director of International Rescue Committee in Seattle, about the challenges and struggles of resettling refugees around Puget Sound. 

 Trump fan David Johnston of Maple Valley got to Donald Trump's Everett rally at 2 a.m. He said he arrived that early in hopes of getting his hat signed.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's David Hyde about Donald Trump's event in Everett Tuesday night. Trump spoke to a crowd about jobs and how he plans to keep them in Washington state. 

The Federal Highway Administration has granted Oregon $2.1 million for the state’s pay-per-mile tax program. The pilot OReGO program started in 2015 and now includes more than 1,200 vehicles.

"We received funding to expand our technology options and to develop new ones potentially, including a manual option that we would need if we were to go to a fully mandated statewide program," said Michelle Godfrey, an Oregon Department of Transportation spokeswoman.

Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Xfinity Arena in Everett on Tuesday night.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

Donald Trump said he’s got a good reason to bring his anti-TPP, anti-refugee rhetoric to Boeing country.

“They say Republicans don’t win Washington state, but we’re going to win it,” Trump told the crowd Tuesday night at Xfinity Arena in Everett. “That’s why I’m here.”


Seattle City Hall
Flickr Photo/Daniel X. O'Neil (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1OGMTuh

Seattle leaders are pushing for a new level of worker's rights, on top of the city's $15 minimum wage law. The next proposal: predictable scheduling. The City Council will discuss the topic next week and vote on the legislation later in September.

Unionized Washington state employees want a pay raise. They plan to rally Wednesday at the state Capitol.

Crosscut writer Knute Berger and KUOW's Kim Malcolm
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Kim Malcolm talks with Crosscut writer Knute Berger about why people in and around Everett might be receptive to Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's stances. Trump is holding a rally Tuesday at the Xfinity Arena in Everett at 7 p.m.

As part of the project A Nation Engaged, NPR and member stations are exploring America's role in the world heading into the presidential election.

Everyone knew President Obama would say something about gay rights when he visited Kenya last summer. Many American activists were pressing him to publicly condemn Kenya's colonial-era law making homosexuality a crime.

Bill Radke sits down with David Jones, a Subway franchisee and founder of the Blazing Onion restaurant chain, to discuss proposed secure scheduling legislation in Seattle. The law is aimed at giving workers more control over their schedules and threatens employers with penalties if they don't comply. But Jones feels it's misguided, will have unintended consequences and hurts businesses that are doing nothing wrong. 

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about the economic pictures painted by incumbent Washington  Governor Jay Inslee and challenger Bill Bryant in their first gubernatorial debate.

The company involved in a data breach involving Northwest fish and game licenses is a vendor the state of Washington has been trying to part ways with for years.

This November, Washington voters must decide how to vote on the nation’s first ever carbon tax. Initiative 732 would increase taxes on fossil fuel consumption to fight climate change, but cut business and sales taxes.


The tent city where Jungle residents are being encouraged to move.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

In mid-August, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced a task force to review the city’s homeless sweeps practice, but homeless advocates are plowing forward with their own plan.

The advocates aren't pleased with Seattle's approach to helping people who live on the street. Specifically, they're concerned about the practice of sweeping homeless camps with little advance notice.

Bill Radke speaks with Yakima Herald-Republic reporter Kate Prengaman about why tribes are living in substandard conditions at fishing sites along the Columbia river, and what the U.S. government is trying to do about it.

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