Gov. Jay Inslee, left, a Democrat, and Bill Bryant, his Republican opponent.
Campaign photographs

Bill Radke talks to Seattle Times political reporter Jim Brunner about the debate between Governor Jay Inslee and his Republican challenger, Bill Bryant, on Monday night. 

Courtesy of Michelle Kaufman

Bill Radke speaks with writer and humorist Dave Barry about what it's like to live in a state that's relevant during presidential elections. While Hillary Clinton will almost certainly get Washington's electoral votes, Florida, per usual, is up for grabs. 

Barry, whose new book is "Best. State. Ever.: A Florida Man Defends His Homeland," tells Radke about the origins of Florida's wacky reputation (the 2000 election), what he thinks of Seattle and what we can all learn this election season from Florida's legendary electoral foibles. 

The U.S. government has agreed to pay a total of $492 million to 17 American Indian tribes for mismanaging natural resources and other tribal assets, according to an attorney who filed most of the suits.

Soldiers fire two rounds from their High Mobility Artillery Rocket systems at Yakima Training Center in 2011.
Flickr Photo/DVIDSHUB (CC BY 2.0)/

The Army plans to practice firing its High Mobility Artillery Rocket System this week at Joint Base Lewis-McChord despite concern from neighbors about the impact of the noise.

Much of the feedback solicited by the Army from neighbors around the base was negative. Many said noise from the unarmed rockets would be disruptive to children, animals and people with post-traumatic stress disorder.  

AP Photo/Evan Vucci and Andrew Harnik

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton went head-to-head in the first presidential debate Monday night.

NPR's politics team annotated the debate, below. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact checking from NPR reporters and editors.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has appointed Margaret Salazar as the new head of the state agency that handles works to provide affordable housing. The announcement was made as lawmakers gear up to tackle housing issues during next year's legislative session.

On Monday, two Washington state Supreme Court justices apologized for the timing of their charter school ruling in September last year.

They spoke at a candidate forum in Seattle where education questions were hotly debated.

A new federal bill was introduced Monday that would further protect whistleblowers at Hanford and other nuclear sites. The legislation was penned by thee Democratic senators: Oregon’s Ron Wyden, Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts, and Claire McCaskill of Missouri.

This month federal regulators fined Wells Fargo $185 million for opening checking and credit card accounts on behalf of customers who had no idea that was happening. The bank has promised to try to make restitution.

But that's a lot harder than it sounds. A big question is how to compensate people whose credit scores were hurt by what the bank did.

Former Wells Fargo employees who say they were fired for following the law have filed a class-action lawsuit seeking $2.6 billion in damages as the fallout continues over the creation of millions of secret, unauthorized bank accounts.

Two employees are named in the lawsuit, filed on behalf of all the bank's employees in the past 10 years who were penalized for not making sales quotas.

Newly released FBI data show the number of murders in the U.S. rose nearly 11 percent last year and violent crime increased by nearly 4 percent, but crime researchers said homicides and other violence still remain at low rates compared with a crime wave from 20 years ago.

In addition to choosing our next president and some members of Congress this fall, voters in many areas of the country may be able to vote for new trains and buses.

In several cities, counties and regions, the Nov. 8 ballots will include measures asking voters to pay more taxes to fund transit projects. From Atlanta to Seattle, Detroit to Los Angeles, there are close to $200 billion in transit and infrastructure improvements at stake.

SPU reports that residents are confusing bags made out of recycled materials with bags that can be used for composting.
Courtesy of Seattle Public Utilities

Seattleites, you have been composting wrong.

Seattle Public Utilities says people often put produce bags in the compost bin, but not all of those bags are biodegradable. That messes up the city's composting machines, which are costly to fix. 

After a bitter primary battle that culminated with Ted Cruz being booed off the stage at the Republican National Convention, the Texas senator says he will vote for Donald Trump.

In a 741-word Facebook post Friday, Cruz wrote that he made the decision because he wants to "keep his word" to vote for the Republican nominee and because he finds Hillary Clinton "wholly unacceptable."

KUOW photo/Bond Huberman

After last week’s announcement by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray to put the plans for the new North Precinct building on hold, protesters interrupted a City Council meeting. What new issues are they raising with the city?