government

At the Democratic National Convention this week, Bernie Sanders announced that his successful rival, Hillary Clinton, had adopted one of his most popular proposals: Free tuition at public colleges.

Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

David Hyde talks with Sen. Patty Murray about Hillary Clinton's historic nomination for president. Murray speaks Thursday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

UW student Varisha Khan at the Democratic National Convention in July. She says it's important  that "the hate speech they we're hearing -- the hate speech that's become the norm -- that that gets challenged."
KUOW PHOTO/David Hyde

Hillary Clinton may not be the first woman to run for president. Victoria Woodhull did that back in 1872, on the Equal Rights Party ticket with Frederick Douglass.

But Hillary Clinton is the first to be nominated by a major political party. And that’s a big deal for a number of women from Washington state in Philadelphia for the Democratic National Convention.

WA delegate on Hillary Clinton's historic night

Jul 27, 2016
Washington Democratic delegate Jamian Smith.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Bill Radke talks with Washington state delegate Jamian Smith and KUOW's David Hyde from the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaking with supporters at a town hall meeting at Hillside Middle School in Manchester, New Hampshire on Jan. 22, 2016.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Cvop2D

Twelve women have run for president – ever.

That’s partly because women didn’t get the right to vote until 1919. But Margaret O’Mara, professor of history at the University of Washington, said that’s also because we view the presidency as a hyper masculine office.

Bernie Sanders addresses the Washington state delegates at breakfast Wednesday morning.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night as the first woman to receive the presidential nomination from a major political party. Not everyone was jovial about it, though. 

Some of Washington's delegates who support Bernie Sanders left the convention hall to stage a protest in the media area.

There was no script for the protest Tuesday night by Bernie supporters, who walked out after Hillary Clinton's formal nomination and jammed the media center.
KUOW PHOTO/KATE WALTERS

If you compare the tone of the Republican convention with Bill Clinton's speech on Tuesday night and Michelle Obama's two nights ago, you could argue that the Democrats are more positive.

But that’s what you see on stage. These are giant theatrical productions.

Washington delegate Pamela Eakes at the convention in Philadelphia: 'Young girls right now can look up and they're going to see a president who is a mother, a woman.'
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night when she became the first woman nominated for president by a major party.

The moment drew mixed emotions from Washington state delegates. Many were ecstatic. Hillary delegate Pam Eakes danced on the floor and yelled, "This is it."

Pride flag Seattle LGBTQ
Flickr Photo/Cloganese (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1LPdJO9

The American Medical Association opposes "gay conversion therapy" — counselors who offer conversion therapy aim to change a person's sexual orientation or gender identity.

Now, Seattle's City Council wants an outright ban on conversion therapy for minors.

The Democratic National Convention made history Tuesday evening: Amid applause, shouts, cheers and in some cases tears, the delegates on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia nominated Hillary Clinton for president of the United States.

Clinton is now the first female presidential candidate of a major American party.

Delegates and protesters share a ride to the Democratic Convention Tuesday. Protesters were asked to disembark a stop before the convention.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Democrats woke up Tuesday morning still aglow from Michelle Obama's epic address at the convention Monday evening.

It was a useful distraction from the ongoing tension with staunch Bernie Sanders supporters. Some have come around to Hillary Clinton, but protesters continued demonstrating in Philadelphia.

Marijuana plant
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

The moratorium on marijuana businesses in unincorporated parts of King County is just about over. The King County Council voted last night to lift the four month ban.

Council members also considered a move to allow retail pot stores in neighborhood business zones. People like Linda Mango asked policy makers to approve of that legislation.

A district judge in Texas has dismissed the last remaining criminal charges against two activists who covertly recorded videos of themselves attempting to buy fetal tissue from Planned Parenthood.

David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt used fake IDs when they approached the organization. They were indicted for tampering with government records, a felony charge. Those charges have now been dismissed on technical grounds.

An attorney for the pair called it "a huge win for First Amendment rights," NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports.

Boos from Bernie Sanders supporters drowned out U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge, the convention chair, when she mentioned Hillary Clinton on Monday.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

If you want to have the Hillary Clinton-Bernie Sanders divide explained in two sound bites, you could do worse than Jack Smith and Pamela Eakes.

State Rep. Noel Frame on giving Bernie supporters some space: "Frankly it's a little bit of a grieving process. And I think we need to understand and respect that."
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

It was an all-star cast as the Democratic National Convention kicked off last night in Philadelphia.

Al Franken. Sarah Silverman. Cory Booker. Michelle Obama. Bernie Sanders.

And Washington state’s delegation heard their messages for Sanders’ supporters: Unite, and vote for Hillary Clinton.


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