government

The Record: Thursday, Jan. 28, Full Show

Jan 28, 2016
KUOW Photo

Why is Seattle spending $50 million to address a homeless crisis that gets worse? The mayor says the city's many, many nonprofits are well-meaning, but wasteful.

Also, the federal government is demanding some of its military surplus back from Washington state.

And how much worse can Catholic Church sexual abuse be? Ask Native Americans.

Listen to the full show above, or check out the individual stories:

The Jungle: a green beltway east of Interstate 5 where dozens of homeless people live.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke speaks with Mark Putnam about the 2016 One Nigh Count. The One Night Count is designed to give King County a snapshot of how many people are unsheltered on our streets in a single night. Putnam is the director of All Home King County, the agency responsible for the count. 

Queen Anne hill in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/craterdweller (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/5tqcxH

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times reporter Jessica Lee about the growing trend in Magnolia, Queen Anne and Ballard of hiring private police to watch out for crime in the neighborhoods. Radke also gets reaction from Seattle Mayor Ed Murray on the trend of private police.  

A U.S. Marine, with Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, navigates under constantina wire during a bayonet course training evolution aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, Calif., June 1, 2012.
Flickr Photo/DVIDSHUB (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ciQaxY

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW military affairs reporter Patricia Murphy about the federal government taking back some surplus military equipment, but all they want from Washington state are its bayonets. 

Update, 9:15 p.m.

In a press conference, the FBI said Thursday night that four militants still remained at the wildlife refuge, but that the perimeter around them had been reduced.

They also announced that the full video of the arrest of Bundy and several other militants, as well as the shooting death of LaVoy Finicum, had been released.

Allowing transgender people access to the restroom or locker room of their choice stirs strong feelings. Advocates on both sides of that debate packed a hearing room in Olympia Wednesday.

In the future, mental health professionals may not be the only people spreading the word about suicide prevention.

The message could also come from people you’d least likely expect to be front-line educators on suicide awareness: pharmacists, firearm dealers, shooting range operators, and even Fish and Wildlife staff.

As law enforcement increases its activity surrounding the occupied Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon Governor Kate Brown said her primary concern continues to be the safety of Oregon residents.

The Record: Wednesday, Jan. 27, Full Show

Jan 27, 2016

After yesterday’s fatal arrest, the armed occupation of an Oregon wildlife refuge goes on. We talk with a reporter on the scene.

Also, just as Seattle’s  mayor was about to give a prime-time speech on homelessness, two people were killed at the homeless encampment known as The Jungle. What happens to the debate now?

And why does Washington have a teacher shortage? We’ll ask the state’s teacher of the year.

Listen to the full show above, including additional commentary by Q13's C.R. Douglas, or check out the individual stories:

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a recent verdict which found a Toronto police officer guilty of attempted murder. In 2013, Constable Jame Forcillo shot and killed 18-year-old Sammy Yatim on a streetcar. 

The City of Ferguson, Mo., and the Justice Department have released a draft of the consent decree that they have negotiated.

The 127-page proposed agreement creates guidelines for training police officers on issues like when they should use force and how they can "reorient Ferguson's use-of-force policies toward de-escalation and avoiding force." The agreement also requires body-worn cameras and an overhaul of the municipal court system.

Nate Gibbs-Bowling of Lincoln High School in Tacoma received a $25,000 Milken Educator Award in April 2014. He was also named the 2016 Washington state teacher of the year.
Courtesy of Milken Family Foundation

The Washington State Legislature has been trying to fix our education system for years. This year, they've got a new challenge to deal with: a teacher shortage. According to a survey from the state's Office of Superintendent Public Instruction, 58 percent of elementary school principals say they are in crisis mode trying to find qualified substitute teachers.

Ammon Bundy, center, one of the sons of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, walks off after speaking with reporters during a news conference at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters Monday, Jan. 4, 2016, near Burns, Ore.
AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

Bill Radke speaks with Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter John Sepulvado about the future of the armed occupation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge after the FBI arrested Ammon Bundy, the leader of the militant group. 

In a sign the armed occupation of a federal wildlife refuge may be winding down, the FBI announced late Wednesday that eight people had left the compound. Five were released and three arrested.

The FBI said in a statement:

"All [three] were in contact with the FBI, and each chose to turn himself into [sic] agents at a checkpoint outside the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. The arrests were without incident.

No country is free of public corruption, a scourge that has wide-ranging effects on the lives of billions of people. But in 2015, more countries saw drops in corruption than those that saw gains, according to the new Corruption Perceptions Index.

Pages