government

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee wants oil trains to slow down and safety improvements to speed up. Inslee said Wednesday that he personally delivered that message to the CEO of Union Pacific and the executive chairman of BNSF over the last 48 hours.

oil train, transportation
Flickr Photo/Russ Allison Loar (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/aqtNAn

The oil train spill June 3 in Mosier, Oregon was the latest of about 20 oil train derailments in the US since 2013. The group Earth Justice tracks derailments and spills with an online map.

One Washington lawmaker says there's a way to limit the danger of derailments or oil spills in this state: build an oil pipeline. (The state already has some fuel pipelines, but not one that's state-wide.)

Following Friday’s derailment in the Columbia Gorge, environmental groups are petitioning the Obama administration to ban rail transport of the most flammable kind of crude oil. And Oregon Democratic Senator Ron Wyden said on the floor of the U.S. Senate Tuesday that it was clear that Oregon got lucky -- this time.

Glenn Brunkow is a fifth-generation corn and soybean farmer. He and his dad run a small farm about 30 miles from Topeka, Kan.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Bill Radke speaks with Josh Feit about a heated text message exchange between Seattle Mayor Ed Murray and City Councilmember Sally Bagshaw concerning the city's response to the homeless encampment known as the Jungle. Feit is the political editor for Seattle Met magazine and writes the local politics blog, Publicola. 

A scene from a simulation by the Washington State Department of Transportation of what could happen if a massive earthquake hits the Alaskan Way Viaduct.
YouTube/WSDOT

Emily Fox talks with Lt. Col. Clayton Braun about Cascadia Rising, a four-day exercise to test the emergency response to a 9.0 magnitude earthquake along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Braun is a member of the Washington State National Guard.

After days of digging in on his racially charged criticism of U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel, Donald Trump appears to have changed his tune.

The presumptive Republican nominee released a statement late Tuesday afternoon that seemed to back away somewhat from his earlier statements saying the judge, who is overseeing a case against the now-defunct Trump University, cannot be fair because of his Mexican heritage and Trump's calls for building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

The Democratic Party about to nominate a historic candidate. That candidate's opponent not ready to accept that reality.

Bernie Sanders?

No, Hillary Clinton in 2008.

Washington’s troubled Western State Hospital won’t lose nearly $50 million in federal funding -- for now. On Friday morning, Gov. Jay Inslee announced a 13-month turnaround agreement with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff, King County Executive Dow Constantine and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray at Capitol Hill’s light rail station.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle-based Sound Transit has made its plan to expand regional transit slightly faster and slightly more expensive.


Pioneer Square apartment listed at $130/night on Airbnb.
Courtesy of Airbnb

Bill Radke hosts a discussion between Rebecca Saldana, executive director of Puget Sound Sage, and Michelle Acquavella, owner of Sea to Sky Rentals,  about proposed legislation before the Seattle City Council that would tighten the regulations around short term rental websites like Airbnb or VRBO.

Johanna Holden, a San Francisco canvasser.
Courtesy of Raja Shah

So you're walking down the street, and you see one of those people with a clipboard and they try and lure you to help them with their virtuous cause.

What do you do? Do you feel guilty? Annoyed? Do you talk to them, or do you just keep walking?

Hillary Clinton channeled a little bit of Donald Trump in San Diego on Thursday afternoon, delivering a blistering attack on her likely Republican opponent's qualifications to run the country.

"Making Donald Trump our commander in chief would be a historic mistake," Clinton told a cheering, and at times laughing, audience.

House Speaker Paul Ryan is ending his delicate dance around his party's presumptive presidential nominee, writing in an op-ed that he will vote for Donald Trump this fall.

The Wisconsin Republican has voiced reservations over Trump's tone throughout the campaign and disagrees with him on many policy areas. Last month, he met with the likely GOP nominee and withheld his endorsement. As recent as last week, he was still holding out.

Picture this. An email pops into your inbox. It promises to help you "make some real money and live the kind of life that you thought was only for 'rich' people." To help you "spend your life living it your way."

The pitch sounds promising, because it's December 2008, and the economy has collapsed all around you.

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