government

EarthFix Reports
10:03 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Feds: Crude Oil Headed For Northwest Poses ‘Significant Risk’

BNSF Railway moves the majority of Bakken oil from North Dakota to refineries in the Northwest.
Flickr Photo/Roy Luck

An alert, issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation on Thursday said that the crude oil coming out of the Bakken formation of North Dakota poses a “significant risk” because it is more flammable than traditional heavy crude.

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Unemployment Benefits
9:01 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Jobless In Seattle: Researcher Struggles To Get Back In The Market

Suzan Del Bene (left) held a round table discussion on unemployment benefits, January 2, 2014, at the WorkSource Affiliate Office at North Seattle Community College.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

More than 24,000 Washington residents lost their federal unemployment benefits late last month. Congress let expire an emergency federal jobless program that was created in 2008 during the great recession.

One Seattle researcher has been struggling to find work since last spring. 

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Labor
2:39 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Raising The Minimum Wage: Why States Are Starting To Take Action

New York is another national city that has hosted rallies to raise the minimum wage to $15 like SeaTac, Wash., just did.
Flickr Photo/The All-Nite Images

Marcie Sillman talks with Jack Temple, a National Employment Law Project policy analyst, about the movement to raise the minimum wage and why states are starting to take action.

Prison
12:53 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Food As Punishment: Giving U.S. Inmates 'The Loaf' Persists

Lisa Brown for NPR

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 12:49 pm

In many prisons and jails across the U.S., punishment can come in the form of a bland, brownish lump. Known as nutraloaf, or simply "the loaf," it's fed day after day to inmates who throw food or, in some cases, get violent. Even though it meets nutritional guidelines, civil rights activists urge against the use of the brick-shaped meal.

Tasteless food as punishment is nothing new: Back in the 19th century, prisoners were given bread and water until they'd earned with good behavior the right to eat meat and cheese.

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Suspect Detention
4:07 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

New Laws For Guantanamo Bay

Camp Delta, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Flickr Photo/Joint Task Force Guantanamo

Steve Scher talked with Marc Falkoff, associate professor of law at Northern Illinois University, about closing Guantanamo Bay.

Crime & Courts
3:10 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

Prosecutor Who Oversaw WAMU Fraud Case Retires After 35 Years

David Hyde talks with Bob Westinghouse about his three decades-long career as a federal prosecutor in western Washington.

Labor
3:10 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

Labor Expert Says Seattle Was Epicenter Of Labor Movement In 2013

Locally, one of the biggest labor stories of the year was the contract dispute between Boeing and the Machinist Union.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Marcie Sillman talks with John Nichols, Washington correspondent at The Nation, about the year's most significant labor stories.

Labor
3:40 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

$15 Minimum Wage Proponents To Appeal Court Decision

Sea-Tac Airport.
Flickr Photo/Nancy White

Steve Scher talks with Heather Weiner, Yes! for SeaTac campaign spokeswoman, about the next steps after a King County Superior Court Judge ruled the minimum wage law would not apply to employees who work inside the Sea-Tac airport.

Boeing Negotiations
2:45 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

Despite Union Objections, Local Politicians Urge Approval Of Boeing Contract

Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson.

Marcie Sillman talks with Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson about why he's urging the machinist union to approve Boeing's contract offer.

National Security
1:08 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

Has President Obama Lived Up To His Promise To Protect Civil Liberties?

President Barack Obama.
Flickr photo/Muhammad Ghafari

Steve Scher talks with David Cole, constitutional lawyer and national security expert, about how the state of security has changed post 9/11 and whether or not President Obama's civil liberty record holds up to his promises.

News Of 2013
12:06 pm
Fri December 27, 2013

The Year In Review: Headliners And Non-Stories That Made Headlines

The troubled rollout of the Affordable Care Act's health exchange caused plenty of stress for President Obama and was one of the top stories of the year.
AP Photo/Charles Dharapak

The presents are unwrapped, the eggnog is gone: Let’s start packing away the news stories that dominated the year. We'll discuss the year that was with Crosscut's Knute Berger, news analyst Joni Balter and C.R. Douglas from Q13 FOX News. Plus host of Live Wire, Luke Burbank drops in to discuss the non-stories that made headlines this year.

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'Criminal Mischief'
9:22 am
Thu December 26, 2013

New Laws In Washington: Rioting Gets Name Change, Seahawks Fandom Licensed

November 1999 photo of WTO protests in Seattle.
Isabel Esterman Flickr

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 12:36 pm

After January 1, rioting will still be a crime in Washington. But it will get a new name. And Seahawks fans will have a new way to show their loyalty to the team.

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Sobriety Tests
9:21 am
Thu December 26, 2013

New Year Brings Sobriety Testing For Repeat Drunk Drivers

Officer Durbin of the Portland Police Department tests volunteer Jennifer Van Vleet for blood alcohol level in this 2009 file photo.
Oregon Department of Transportation

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 12:59 pm

Repeat drunk drivers in Washington who get arrested in the New Year may find themselves ordered to blow into a breathalyzer twice a day.

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Marijuana
10:13 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Which Plants Will Kick Off Legal Pot Sales? State Regulators Don't Want To Know

Credit Credit Katherine Hitt / Flickr

State officials promise that Washington’s new legal marijuana market will be airtight, and that plants will be tracked “from seed to sale.”

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Prisons
8:01 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Recruiting Prison Health Care Workers Could Get Harder Under Affordable Care Act

Eric Larsen is an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner for the Washington Department of Corrections.
Eric Hernandez Washington Dept. of Corrections

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 9:21 am

It’s no easy task to find doctors, nurses and other health care professionals to take a job in a prison. The stigma alone is a major barrier. Not to mention concerns about personal safety.

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