government

Why would someone who had been accused of financial misdeeds run for political office? That’s a recurring question in the case of indicted Washington State Auditor Troy Kelley.

The first-term Democrat is accused of corrupt business practices and tax evasion -- allegations that have dogged him since before he ran for statewide office.

Now, Kelley has pleaded not guilty to federal charges and is on leave.

An impressive résumé

Washington Speaker of the House Frank Chopp said “now is not the time” to try to impeach indicted State Auditor Troy Kelley and that it would be a distraction.

housing apartment
Flickr Photo/Andrew Smith (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Stephen O'Connor, the director of the Runstad Center for Real Estate Studies at the University of Washington, about a new report that finds Washington state's housing market is doing well but affordability is still a problem in the Puget Sound area. 

Release Of Omar Khadr Divides Opinion In Canada

May 13, 2015
Canadian demonstrators demanding Khadr's repatriation.
Wikimedia Commons/Joshua Sherurcij

Ross Reynolds speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the release of Omar Khadr, a Canadian citizen convicted of killing a U.S. soldier in 2002. A Canadian judge recently released him on bail while he appeals war-crimes charges in the US. This issue has divided opinions in Canada.

Kayakers protesting the arrival of Shell's Polar Pioneer rig in Port Angeles in April
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Seattle Port Commission has voted to delay the arrival of Arctic drill rigs on the Seattle waterfront, but Shell Oil’s contractor is vowing to bring them here anyway.

A special legislative committee meant to help pave the way for legalized recreational marijuana in Oregon has hit some road bumps.

Washington State Auditor Troy Kelley was elected to root out waste and fraud in state and local government. Now, the first-term Democrat faces federal charges that he defrauded escrow company customers and the IRS.

Cesar Vargas has a resume most young Americans would envy. He graduated from a Brooklyn high school that counts Sens. Chuck Schumer and Bernie Sanders among its alumni. He made honors in both college and law school. But because he was brought to the United States from Mexico illegally when he was 5 years old, he can't fulfill one of his dreams: joining the armed forces.

"I do believe that because this country has given me so much, I do want to be able to give back," Vargas said in an interview.

From the moment she was taken into custody in 2012, outside a building that stores enriched uranium in Oak Ridge, Tenn., Sister Megan Rice has argued she has been driven by one thing — a desire to spread a message.

"And we all know that nuclear energy is linked inextricably with nuclear weapons," Rice told a group of activists in remarks captured on YouTube.

Prosecutors accused her of violating the Sabotage Act, intending to hurt the government's ability to wage war or defend itself.

There is always a tension between the press and the candidates they cover. Journalists want access, and want to ask questions. Campaigns want to control the message. Over time, that has especially been true with Hillary Clinton.

Gov. Jay Inslee signs a bill expanding the College Bound program. Behind him, middle schoolers from Mill Creek Middle School in Kent. At far left is Sen. David Frockt, who wrote the bill.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill into law Tuesday that expands the College Bound Scholarship program. The program places students from low-income families onto a college prep track as they're wrapping up middle school, and it helps pay their college tuition when they graduate from high school.

The Oregon Senate approved a measure Monday that would ban sales of e-cigarettes to minors as well as ban the use of e-cigarettes in the same places where traditional cigarettes are prohibited.

Prom season means many high school students will be dancing on their way to prom aboard party buses.

At least there's a beautiful sunset to look at when you're stuck in Seattle traffic.
Flickr Photo/HeatherHeatherHeather (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Traffic is getting worse in Seattle. Our rising population is driving it. And even with a multibillion-dollar transportation package, it's not expected to improve.

Which is why we plug our ears when we hear someone like Gil Penalosa, a former parks commissioner from Colombia, say, “I think congestion is good.”

Seattle City Hall.
Flickr Photo/Daniel X. O'Neil (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Seattle journalist and The C is For Crank blogger Erica C. Barnett about a recent report on gender pay equity for City of Seattle employees.

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