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Who should pay for solving Seattle's homelessness emergency? Can a new income tax make Seattle "Trump-proof"? Are taco trucks the answer to our traffic problem? And would you vote for President Oprah?

Listen to the live discussion Fridays at noon and talk with us on Twitter using #KUOWwir.

The Department of Homeland Security is stepping up its support for Jewish institutions across the nation who've received more than 120 bomb threats in the past two months. Jewish Community Centers have been pressing for help as they've been targeted by waves of threatening calls as well as vandalism.

Since January, the calls coming in to JCCs have been both vivid and unnerving. Betzy Lynch, executive director of the JCC in Birmingham, Ala., got three of the threatening calls, all very similar.

With Oregon’s biggest cities in a housing crunch, lawmakers are considering a measure that would require landlords to give specific reasons for evicting a tenant.

At a conference in Brussels on Thursday, more than a dozen nations and private funders pledged a combined total of $190 million for international family planning charities that stand to lose their U.S. support as a result of President Trump's Jan. 23 executive action to block U.S. foreign aid funding of groups linked to abortion.

FLICKR PHOTO/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/av619h

Bill Radke speaks with Washington Post reporter Dave Weigel about the "gathering storm" around President Trump's attorney general. The Post broke the story that AG Jeff Sessions spoke twice with the Russian ambassador during the presidential campaign, which sounds fishy because Sessions claimed under oath that he didn't have contact with Russian officials.

Updated at 4:56 p.m. ET

Attorney General Jeff Sessions says he will recuse himself from any investigations into possible Russian involvement in the 2016 elections.

"Let me be clear: I never had meetings with Russian operatives or Russian intermediaries about the Trump campaign," Sessions reiterated during an afternoon news conference in response to reports that he had met twice with the Russian ambassador to the U.S. last year.

"I should not be involved in investigating a campaign I had a role in," Sessions said.

For years, parents have been warning their college-age children to be careful what they post on social media.

Now, one young candidate is learning this important lesson the hard way — everything you post can and will be used against you in politics.

People wait to attend a citizenship workshop in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Kim Malcolm talks with Vox staff writer Dara Lind about President Trump's call for a 'merit-based' system for immigration, and how it could impact immigrants living in Washington state.

Right now people who want to cast a ballot in Oregon have to register at least three weeks in advance. But a state senator wants voters to be able to register right up until one day before an election.

President Trump is receiving plaudits for his first joint address to Congress.

The White House certainly thinks it went well — so much so, it was reported that the White House is holding its revised travel ban, in part, to bask in the glow of the positive reviews.

Snap polls after the speech showed that people who watched it largely liked it.

Last fall, the Washington Supreme Court made a decision many home builders and landowners call harmful. The ruling, known as the Hirst decision, requires counties to ensure adequate water supply before granting a permit to build.

United States Capitol building.
Flickr Photo/Eric E Johnson (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7enkXF

President Trump will address a joint session of Congress for the first time on Tuesday evening at the Capitol, around 6:00 p.m. PST.

The address comes a day after Trump gave an outline of his budget plan for Congress, which would increase defense spending and make cuts to domestic programs. Following tradition, House Speaker Paul Ryan invited the president to make the speech to lay out his agenda in the early days of his new administration. 

In a lunch meeting with television anchors before the president's address to Congress Tuesday — a meeting that has traditionally been largely off the record — President Trump said he was open to another attempt at an immigration overhaul.

Initially, the White House (which has been critical of anonymous sourcing) insisted that the news not be attributed to the president.

John Yang of the PBS NewsHour was among those in attendance:

President Trump signed a measure into law Tuesday that rescinds an Obama-era rule aimed at blocking gun sales to certain mentally ill people.

The GOP-majority Senate passed the bill by a 57-43 margin earlier this month, following a House vote to overturn the rule.

Comments Donald Trump made on the campaign trail led to concerns that he would create a database to track Muslims in the U.S.. In a unanimous vote Tuesday, the Washington state House has said “no” to cooperating with such an effort.

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