government

'Week in Review' panel Erica C. Barnett, Ross Reynolds, Gyasi Ross and Jonathan Martin.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ever heard of Seattle's 20-year plan? We discuss why you should care about it.  And what kind of hope should we have for the new approach to the homeless encampment known as the Jungle? Also, as Sound Transit move towards a light-rail future, are they spending too much on the opening day festivities? What does it mean for Washington state now that the Army Corps of Engineers has put a stop to a new deep water terminal in Cherry Point? 

Ross Reynolds talks over the week's news with writer Erica C. Barnett, columnist Jonathan Martin and lawyer and activist Gyasi Ross.  

Flickr Photo/Justin Grimes (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The campaign finance records collected by Washington’s Public Disclosure Commission haven’t always been easy to access. But the agency’s new director, Evelyn Fielding Lopez, says citizens need that information, and she has some interesting ideas on how to get it to them.  

A day after de facto Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump said "there's nothing to learn" from making his tax returns public before this November's elections, the billionaire is taking heat from the party's 2012 nominee over that stance.

Tents lined up in the Jungle, which extends north and south under Seattle's Interstate 5 corridor.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Almost nobody provides outreach and services in the Jungle, the homeless encampment under Interstate 5. Most city-funded outreach workers won't go there because of safety concerns. 

But that's about to change. The city of Seattle is planning what they're calling an intense period of outreach in the Jungle. 

The race to become Oregon's next secretary of state is heating up. The three Democratic candidates in this month's primary are trading barbs after one of them received a huge contribution from a New York billionaire.

And no, it's not Donald Trump.

Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now!, addressing the Chicago Green Festival in 2010.
Chris Eaves/Wikimedia Commons CC by 2.0

Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now! on activist power: 

Bernie Sanders did not start a movement; he tapped into a movement.

The Occupy movement, which never really ended, even though people thought that didn't amount to a hill of beans.

Oh, that's not true.

You say the 1 percent today. And the 99 percent. Everyone knows what you mean. They occupied the language. The word “occupy” was the most looked-up for use word of 2011.

(You change the language, you change the world.)

What do Realtors, teachers and unionized plumbers have in common?

According to Washington’s Public Disclosure Commission, these groups control the top political action committees in the state so far this year. So what exactly are they after?

The U.S. has $19 trillion in debt, and Donald Trump is upset about it.

Two days after drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán was transferred to a prison near Juárez, a Mexican city near the U.S. border, a federal judge in Mexico said the extradition process can move forward.

An unnamed judge said the "legal requirements laid out in the extradition treaty" between the U.S. and Mexico had been met, The Associated Press reports, adding that Mexico's foreign ministry has 20 days to approve the extradition.

David A. Bauders, a Washingon State Trooper, was killed while in Iraq with the National Guard.
Courtesy of WSP

A National Guard soldier from Seattle has died in Iraq. The Department of Defense says the officer's death was not combat related.

The Army says 1st Lt. David A. Bauders died Friday on Iraq's Al Asad Airbase.  He’d been deployed since April to Iraq and Kuwait with the 176th Engineer Company of Snohomish.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

After North Carolina's governor filed a lawsuit asking federal courts to keep in place a controversial law that places limits on transgender access to bathrooms, the U.S. Justice Department responded with a lawsuit of its own.

Jon Meer of Light Under The Bridge is the outsider who comes to the Jungle most often.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Every day, social workers reach out to homeless people on the streets of Seattle. But there’s one place social workers seldom go: the Jungle.

That’s the notorious homeless encampment under Interstate 5 where there have been assaults, rapes and stabbings. Many outreach workers consider it too dangerous. But a few do enter the Jungle. 

'Week in Review' panel Zaki Hamid, Bill Radke, Pamela Banks and Bill Finkbeiner.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

A dramatic “no” vote on a Seattle basketball arena leads to a misogynistic backlash, how do we get anything done in this city? And can we have Husky cheerleaders without being all kinds of exclusive? What are Trump and Clinton nostalgic about – and how about you?

Top read: Yes, I live in the Jungle. And so do 400 other people

Bill Radke gets wistful about the week gone by with the Urban League’s Pamela Banks, Humanities Washington’s Zaki Hamid and former Washington Republican state Senate Majority Leader Bill Finkbeiner. 

Donald Trump is coming to Lynden, Wash.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Residents of Lynden, Washington, were surprised that presidential candidate Donald Trump was coming to their small town near the Canadian border.

Now Trump’s campaign has offered an explanation -- and it has nothing to do with border security or any other issue Trump plans to talk about.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is demanding a formal explanation after State Auditor Troy Kelley asked two top staff members to resign and put a third on administrative leave. The shake-up follows Kelley’s full-time return to the office after his six-week federal trial.

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