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A government sign at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation
Flickr Photo/Tobin (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ez3FA

Kim Malcolm talks with Northwest News Network Richland correspondent Anna King about a report from the Government Accountability Office that raises serious safety concerns at Hanford's waste treatment plant.

Federal officials were in Spokane Wednesday night to talk about the future of the Columbia River Treaty, an agreement between the U.S. and Canada that dates back to 1964. It governs hydropower and flood control measures along the upper reaches of the 1,200 mile Columbia River.

Shielded by an identity-protecting tarp, a Seattle locksmith drills the locks on a Russian-owned consular building.
RT Twitter feed

Yesterday afternoon in Madison Park, you may have seen an unusual breaking and entering. U.S. State Department officials drilled through the locks on the gate of a Russian-owned home, while former consular employees filmed across the street.

The presidents of North Korea and South Korea are scheduled to meet this Friday, in a prelude to a summit in the works between North Korea's Kim Jong Un and President Trump to talk about North Korea's nuclear program.

The summit between Kim and South Korean President Moon Jae-in will be the third time the countries' top leaders have met since the Korean War. Trump's meeting with Kim is expected to occur next month.

Senator Maria Cantwell questioned the acting head of the U.S. Forest Service, Vicki Christiansen, this week. Among the senator's top concerns: there may not be enough air support for fires in the West this year.

The Russian government occupied this Madison Park home in Seattle until the U.S. ordered Russian diplomats to leave Washington state in April, 2018.
Google Maps

It was a big week on the job for one Seattle locksmith. The task: unlock the gate and front door of a mansion owned by the Russian government. The house, a Seattle landmark, is on East Madison Street in Seattle's Madison Park neighborhood.

FILE: U.S. Supreme Court
Flickr Photo/Phil Roeder (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/T2SxdT

Bill Radke talks to Lisa Marshall Manheim, associate professor at the University of Washington School of Law, about what arguments were presented in front of the Supreme Court Wednesday in favor and against Trump's travel ban. Washington state was among those suing the president over the executive order.

Seattle police officers observe marchers moving down 4th Avenue during the Black Lives Matter rally in Seattle, Saturday April 15, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Seattle is about to appoint its first-ever inspector general of police. The city’s chosen candidate, Lisa Judge, said the Seattle Police Department shows “a hunger for progressive change” that is a rarity in the policing world. 

During intense arguments at the Supreme Court on Wednesday, the justices, by a narrow margin, seemed to be leaning toward upholding the third and current version of the Trump travel ban.

Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is often the deciding vote in closely contested cases, for example, made repeated comments suggesting that the court does not usually second-guess a president's national security decisions — even in the context of an immigration law that bans discrimination based on nationality.

A federal judge has ruled against the Trump administration's decision to end deportation protections for some young immigrants, saying the White House was "arbitrary and capricious" in moving to end the Obama-era DACA program.

In a blow to President Trump, who has long railed against the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, U.S. District Judge John D. Bates for the District of Columbia said the Department of Homeland Security had failed to provide an adequate rationale for why the program is unlawful.

A federal watchdog agency said Wednesday that it's hard to prove that Hanford’s Waste Treatment Plant is safe. 

This March 20, 2016, photo shows the Hart family of Woodland, Wash., at a Bernie Sanders rally in Vancouver, Wash.
AP Photo/Tristan Fortsch, handout

Bill Radke talks to Seattle Times reporter Nina Shapiro about what Oregon officials knew about the Hart family and allegations of child abuse. Six of the family members, including both mothers, have been confirmed dead and two children are still missing after they drove off a California cliff.

In Seattle, there’s a national fire research lab where scientists have been working on a new computer model to better aid land managers as they predict how fires will behave and where smoke will go. But now that federal work’s been halted.

The sentencing of former Washington Auditor Troy Kelley has been delayed until the end of June while his attorneys seek to have Kelley’s federal conviction for possession of stolen funds overturned--or a new trial granted.

In this Dec. 9, 2015, photo, a sales associate walks past semiautomatic rifles at Bullseye Sport gun shop in Riverside, Calif.
AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

This year’s race for Washington’s 8th Congressional District is considered among the country’s most competitive. In 2016 its voters chose Democrat Hillary Clinton along with Republican Dave Reichert. Now Reichert is retiring and Republican Dino Rossi is running to replace him.


Construction continues on a new apartment complex on Monday, March 12, 2018, at the intersection of Aurora Avenue North and 109th St., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle has an affordability and housing problem, and the City Council is considering asking businesses to chip in. A proposal in the works would tax Seattle businesses with at least $20 million in taxable gross receipts 26 cents per employee for every hour they work.

The city estimates that an employee tax would raise about $75 million a year.

Should businesses pay more? We debate the pros and cons with Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien and Seattle Chamber of Commerce president and CEO Marilyn Strickland.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson is breaking with tradition and will endorse a ballot measure dealing with guns. 

State lawmakers worked with police and community groups during the last legislative session to change the rules for prosecuting police who use deadly force. But it will be voters who decide whether those changes become law. On Friday, a Superior Court judge in Thurston County said lawmakers violated the state constitution, and put Initiative 940 on the November ballot. KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins explains the situation with Ross Reynolds.

FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russian Intelligence Activities.
AP Photo/Cliff Owen

Ross Reynolds talks with Kathy Loedler, a 23-year veteran of the FBI and now CEO of the Rampart Group, and Carolyn Woodbury, former supervisory special agent in Seattle who spent more than 20 years with the FBI. They discuss former FBI Director James Comey's book tour and what it means for the FBI's reputation.

A memorial for Charleena Lyles is shown outside of Solid Ground Brettler Family Place on Monday, June 19, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

A Seattle nonprofit is no longer part of a lawsuit filed by the family of Charleena Lyles. A King County judge dismissed Solid Ground from the wrongful death suit Friday.

Superior Court Judge Julie Spector ruled that Solid Ground was not legally responsible for the police shooting.

At the Washington State Penitentiary in Walla Walla, inmates with mental illness are locked down in their cells for up to 16 hours a day, even if they pose little risk. That’s one of the allegations in a lawsuit Disability Rights Washington plans to file in federal court in Spokane on Monday.

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET

Mike Pompeo is on track to become secretary of state after a key Republican senator gave a last-minute endorsement of the CIA director.

The secretary of state-designate's nomination was approved by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Monday night on a party-line vote. The vote was 10 Republicans for Pompeo, nine Democrats against. One Democrat voted present.

Amazon has been one of President Trump's favorite targets on Twitter.

He has accused the company of not collecting taxes (which it does), charged it with putting retailers out of business — and focused his attacks on the tech company's relationship with the Postal Service.

So the president might be surprised to learn that one of Amazon's biggest customers is, in fact, the federal government. Amazon's relationship with the government goes well beyond delivering packages — to playing a vital role in protecting America's national security secrets.

Brian Davison, a Commissioner in Kitsap County, stands on the steps of the Legislative Building on Saturday, April 21, 2018, during a March For Our Rights pro gun rally at the Washington state capitol, in Olympia.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Over 1,000 people were estimated to be in attendance on Saturday afternoon for a "March For Our Rights" pro-gun rally on the steps of the Washington state capitol. 

Nearly 20 percent of people in Washington and 15 percent in Oregon speak a language other than English at home. Emergency managers from around the West are grappling with how to reach people in foreign languages in the midst of a disaster. A new Washington state law seeks to raise the bar.

Construction continues on the SR-99 tunnel on Thursday, November 2, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

You know the phrase: "You have to spend money to make money." That's the case for tolling the state Route 99 tunnel in Seattle.

Washington state says it will spend about $500 million to run a tolling system on the tunnel in order to fulfill its obligations.

This photo was posted to the Pierce County Sheriff's Office Facebook page earlier in the week.
Pierce County Sheriff's Office Facebook page

In the photo above — posted by the Pierce County Sheriff’s Office on Facebook and Twitter this week – a man sits on the ground after being Tased by police. He wears nothing but black underwear briefs and a rosary around his neck. His small dog looks up at the camera.

Tera Oglesby and her son join protesters outside the construction site of King County’s new youth detention center in Seattle, where three clergy members chained themselves together around a construction beam.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A protest at the site for the new King County youth detention center apparently halted construction this morning.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is levying a $1 billion fine against Wells Fargo — a record for the agency — as punishment for the banking giant's actions in its mortgage and auto loan businesses.

Wells Fargo's "conduct caused and was likely to cause substantial injury to consumers," the agency said in its filings about the bank.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is stepping up his role as chair of the Democratic Governors Association. Inslee was in Las Vegas Thursday as part of his first major campaign swing.

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