government

Courts
7:23 am
Fri July 11, 2014

Washington Supreme Court Says 'Stop And Frisk' Went Too Far

File photo of the Washington Supreme Court chambers.

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 4:25 pm

Police in Washington can “stop and frisk” individuals they have specific reason to believe may be armed. But if that search goes beyond a “brief and nonintrusive” search, then it’s unconstitutional.

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Downtown Seattle
2:07 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Homeless Coalition Fighting For Right To Use Federal Building

Marcie Sillman talks to Alison Eisinger, director of the Coalition on Homelessness, about why local homeless advocacy groups are protesting the rejection of their application to convert the Old Federal Reserve building into a comprehensive homeless service center in downtown Seattle.

Unaccompanied Minors
4:40 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

For Kids In Immigration Court, Legal Counsel Is Catch As Catch Can

Protesters outside a San Antonio courthouse advocate for legal representation for immigrant children.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:39 pm

The American Civil Liberties Union and other groups sued the federal government Wednesday for its failure to provide legal representation to immigrant children in deportation proceedings.

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Contraceptive Coverage
2:03 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Senator Murray Wants To Reverse Hobby Lobby Decision

Marcie Sillman talks with Senator Patty Murray about her legislation that would override the Supreme Court's recent Hobby Lobby decision concerning contraceptive coverage. Sillman also speaks with Washington Post congressional reporter Wesley Lowery for analysis on how far Murray's legislation might go.

Unaccompanied Minors
1:28 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Lawsuit: All Kids Facing Deportation Need Attorneys

The federal government continues to struggle with a flood of immigrant children arriving at the U.S. border with Mexico. Today, a class-action suit filed in Seattle seeks additional legal help for these and all other children who face possible deportation.

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Marijuana Legalization
2:55 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Your Burning Questions About Legal Pot, Answered

Marcie Sillman talks with Alison Holcomb, drug policy director for the ACLU of Washington, about marijuana legalization in Washington state.

Industry Regulations
2:50 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Can A 'Bigger Hammer' Stop Oil Refinery Accidents?

Ross Reynolds talks with Dave Fehling, energy and environment reporter for StateImpact Texas, an NPR reporting project, about oil refinery accidents and what happens when they're criminally prosecuted.

Environment
2:44 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

History Of The EPA: From Bipartisan To Polarized

Marcie Sillman talks with Georgetown law professor Lisa Heinzerling about the history of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the change of its scope over time. 

Marijuana
6:43 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Would-Be Customers Eagerly Await Pot Store Openings

Rick Stevens stopped by 420 Carpenter, a marijuana retail location in Lacey, Washington, to see if it was open yet. The retired TSA worker is looking forward to making some homemade edibles and listening to Pink Floyd.

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 5:05 pm

The first legal marijuana stores in Washington are scheduled to open Tuesday. The Liquor Control Board issued the first 24 retail licenses early Monday.

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Highway Standoff
7:42 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Feds Warn States Of Possible Highway Cash Holdback

File photo of construction along I-90 near Roslyn, Washington, in summer 2012.

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:54 pm

The Idaho Transportation Department has suspended advertising for bids for future highway projects. Oregon and Washington may soon do the same.

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Military
12:16 am
Mon July 7, 2014

The Marines Are Looking For A Few Good (Combat-Ready) Women

Sgt. Jarrod Simmons speaks to his squad of Marines before they head out on a training march with 55-pound packs on Feb. 22, 2013, at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Marines and the other military branches must open combat jobs to women in 2016. More than 160 female Marines are taking part in a grueling training program that begins this summer.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:51 am

The challenge for the Marines, and for the Army, is how to open up ground combat jobs to women in January 2016, without lowering standards.

And here's where things stand in the Marines.

Eighty-five female Marines already made it through an infantry training course last fall at Camp Lejeune, N.C., which included drills such as attacking a mock enemy force, hidden in a pine forest. That course lasted eight weeks, and the men and women all completed the same training.

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Industrial Disaster
8:37 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Four Years After Deadly Blast, Tesoro Mostly Unscathed

Charred towers and machinery at the Tesoro Corp. refinery in Anacortes, Washington, following the blast.
Credit AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

It was the state’s worst industrial accident in nearly 50 years.

On a chilly April night in 2010, a giant fireball lit up the sky above Anacortes, Washington. A southeast wind pushed a plume of black smoke toward the heart of this seaside town an hour north of Seattle.

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Online Privacy
6:07 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Report: Most NSA-Intercepted Data From 'Ordinary Internet Users'

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 3:50 pm

A Washington Post analysis of data provided by Edward Snowden has revealed that nine out of 10 communications intercepted by the National Security Agency were from ordinary Internet users, not legally targeted foreigners. But the examination also showed that officials gleaned valuable intelligence from the wide net the agency cast.

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City Politics
3:21 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Mayor Murray On SDOT, City Light Money, And Gun Violence

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about Seattle City Light CEO Jorge Carrasco's salary increase, the newly appointed head of SDOT, and recent officer-involved shootings. Then he, parses the politics with Q13 FOX News political analyst, C.R. Douglas.

California Standoff
7:34 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Migrants Buses Turn Back In Face Of Protesters

Homeland Security buses that carried migrants sit at a facility near the border with Mexico Tuesday, July 1, 2014, in San Diego. (Gregory Bull/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 11:26 am

Homeland Security buses carrying migrant children and families were rerouted Tuesday to a facility in San Diego after American flag-waving protesters blocked the group from reaching a suburban processing center.

The standoff in Murrieta came after Mayor Alan Long urged residents to complain to elected officials about the plan to transfer the Central American migrants to California to ease overcrowding of facilities along the Texas-Mexico border. Many protesters held U.S. flags, while others held signs reading “stop illegal immigration,” and “illegals out!”

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