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Is it a big deal for your Congressperson to avoid holding an in-person town hall? Will the Trump Administration go after Washington state's legal marijuana business? Should Seattle tax soda and other sugary drinks? And is baseball too slow and boring?

Farm in Skagit Valley, WA
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As the Trump administration rolls out new rules on immigration enforcement this week, a bipartisan coalition of business leaders and mayors has launched a new data project that highlights the economic impact of immigrants in the United States.

Official photo

Congressman Dave Reichert (R-8th Dist.) is not holding a Town Hall meeting, unless you count a Facebook Live event he's doing Thursday where he'll answer questions that you can submit online or by email.

Reichert said he's worried a Town Hall could turn into a shouting match, as others have nationwide. And he's concerned about the safety of his staff.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Thursday in response to President Donald Trump’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants. The Democrat said the state will not participate in “mean-spirited policies” on immigration.

On Wednesday, the Trump administration made big news regarding the rights of transgender students. But what exactly changed?

Education Plans Move Forward In Washington Legislature

Feb 22, 2017

The Washington Legislature has reached a milestone in its court-ordered quest to amply fund schools. Both chambers have now passed education funding plans.

The House vote happened Wednesday. But negotiating a final compromise could take months.

The Department of Homeland Security this week released further details on the Trump administration’s immigration policy. It calls on local law enforcement for assistance. But not all Northwest cities are willing to comply.

This week, Trump’s Department of Homeland Security announced an aggressive plan to deport people who are in the United States illegally and who run afoul of the law.

On a visit to Olympia on Wednesday, U.S. Senator Patty Murray described the policy as “very wrongheaded.”

Ever since Donald Trump entered the presidential race, his comments on illegal immigration have been pored over in the press — from vows to deport millions of people to promises that any enforcement plan would have "a lot of heart." Observers asked, again and again, how rhetoric would translate into actual policy.

Now activists and experts have the policies themselves to examine.

Republican members of Congress aren't exactly getting a warm welcome in their home districts during this week's recess.

Flowers outside Jewish Federation Building commemorate the 2006 hate-crime shooting .
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On Tuesday, President Donald Trump spoke out against anti-Semitic threats and incidents, calling them "horrible" and "painful." That's after passing up a couple of chances to do so since he became president.

Nancy Greer, the president and CEO of the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle, told KUOW's David Hyde at least it's a start.

  

Oregon is the only state without an impeachment process. But some state lawmakers are trying to establish a way to impeach statewide elected officials, including the governor.

Donald Trump
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Bill Radke talks to former Congressman Jim McDermott and former chairman of the Washington State Republican Party Chris Vance about the first 100 days of Donald Trump's presidency. They discuss immigration, Russia and the future of the Republican Party.  

With security at the U.S.-Mexico border at the center of a seething controversy, the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court seemed torn at oral arguments on Tuesday — torn between their sense of justice and legal rules that until now have protected U.S. Border Patrol agents from liability in cross-border shootings.

In 2013 the Washington Legislature killed the idea of a bigger, safer bridge between Portland and Vancouver, Washington. Three years later, Washington state lawmakers could take preliminary votes to revive plans to replace the aging Interstate 5 bridge over the Columbia River.

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