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Google

There's a decent chance you — or someone you know — just got an odd email inviting you to edit a document in Google Docs. The email could be from a stranger, a colleague or a friend, but it's addressed to a contact that boasts a whole string of H's in its name.

In other words, it looks a little something like this:

Or, if you're looking at the invite in Gmail, it likely looks more like this:

Either of these look familiar to you? Here's a handy tip: Don't open the link.

It's clear from the numbers. Google has a diversity problem.

For the past few years, the company has publicly shared its workplace makeup in a report detailing the race, gender and ethnicity of each employee hired the previous year. Last year, while the number of black employees went up, they still represented only 2 percent of the company's workforce and Google admitted it fell short of its diversity goal.

Google's products are everywhere: maps, Gmail, the Chrome browser, the Chromecast video/audio system, the Android mobile operating system, YouTube, Waze. But the company has been far less successful at selling things rather than software.

By a 52-48 percent margin, the popular vote in the United Kingdom last night moved to detach the country from the European Union.

It's been a rough week in the news. And it's been a rough week in comment sections ... and Facebook posts ... and Twitter.

If you, like us, could use a bit of Internet delight right now, consider this:

That's a tweet by 25-year-old Ben Eckersley, who lives near Manchester, England. He was visiting his grandmother's place to do laundry — he and his boyfriend don't have a dryer, he told the BBC.

If you're looking for fast cash, feel free to Google it. But if you're selling fast cash, the search giant might not be the place for you.

Starting this summer, Google will no longer allow payday lenders — companies offering short-term, high-interest loans — to buy advertising on Google ad systems.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Seattle's mayor has announced that the city, Comcast and now Google are collaborating to make the Internet more accessible. Mayor Ed Murray revealed an action plan Wednesday for his ongoing Digital Equity Initiative.

Google has a lot of algorithms. And the company updates them on a regular basis. But one update that started rolling out Tuesday has tech writers across the Internet warning of a coming "Mobilegeddon."

The change is only taking place on Google searches made on smartphones. The results will favor websites deemed "mobile friendly," giving them higher rankings than sites that are only optimized for desktops and laptops.

Waze, the popular navigation app boasting more than 50 million users worldwide, has a new critic: police officers. Over the past few weeks, law enforcement officials have been urging the app and its owner, Google, to disable a feature that allows users to report when they've spotted a police officer, in real time, for all other Waze users to see.

Sergio Kopelev, a reserve sheriff in Orange County, Calif., is one of the law enforcement officials behind the push to remove Waze's police tracker. He says he first discovered the feature through his family.

Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington professor Joe Janes about online reputation management.

Fred Vogelstein's book "Dogfight."

David Hyde talks with Wired contributing editor Fred Vogelstein about his new book "Dogfight: How Google and Apple Went to War and Started a Revolution."  The book chronicles the contentious relationship between Apple's Steve Jobs and Google's Eric Schmidt and shows how it has shaped smartphone and tablet technology.

Google, The Government And You

Nov 15, 2013
Official Google Blog

Ross Reynolds talks with Electronic Frontier Foundation staff attorney Nate Cardozo about Google's recent publication of transparency papers that show which governments want to know more about your search history.

Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan

Microsoft servers around the world are dishing out a new version of Windows 8. The new version brings back a start button, something users said they missed.

A lot is riding on the success of the operating system, which is the backbone of Microsoft’s transformation into a devices company. It’s Microsoft’s effort to create a single experience for all Microsoft devices, from smartphone to tablet to laptop.

Flickr Photo/Chris Hardie

Reports from the New York Times, the Guardian and ProPublica cast light on how spy agencies are obtaining private data. The news organizations say the US National Security Agency is using covert partnerships with technology companies to weaken encryption software.

Flickr Photo/Marcin Wichary

Google officially launched construction of a new building to double its campus in Kirkland.

The Seattle area is already home to the third-largest Google center in the US, behind New York City and Mountain View, California. Google says it’s expanding here because it likes the talent coming out of nearby universities. It is not saying how much it intends to grow its workforce in Kirkland.

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