geoduck

Poaching 100-Year-Old Geoducks For Big Money

May 26, 2015
Officer Natalie Vorous unpacks boxes of geoduck at Sea-Tac searching for evidence they were harvested legally. These were not. They were confiscated.
EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

Of all the shellfish that sell on the black market, one clam is above the rest -- the geoduck.

Pronounced gooey-duck, these hefty clams bury themselves in sand where they stay for 100 years, doing little more than stretching their meter-long, fleshy siphon up to feed on phytoplankton.

How To Cook A Geoduck

May 18, 2015
Kevin Bartlett of Taylor Shellfish in Seattle shows David George Gordon, the bug chef, how to cook geoduck.
KCTS9/Aileen Imperial

Geoducks (that's pronounced gooey-duck) are a shellfish delicacy, fetching about $30 a pound here in Seattle. But how do you cook these curious creatures? Kevin Bartlett of Taylor Shellfish at Melrose Market in Seattle showed us how. 

Here's the video; we also provide a step-by-step guide with photos below. 

U.S. officials say they will develop a new testing protocol to detect certain contaminants in shellfish, following their meeting with the Chinese government to discuss an end to that country's ban on importing shellfish from most of the U.S. West Coast.

U.S. officials said during a briefing with reporters Friday that the Chinese are satisfied with U.S. testing methods for paralytic shellfish poisoning but they’re still concerned about arsenic. High concentrations of inorganic arsenic, a carcinogen, were found in the skin of geoduck harvested near Tacoma, Wash., last fall.

KUOW Photo/Katie Campbell

After China banned all imports of West Coast shellfish, officials in the U.S. defended the imports by saying the Chinese tested the wrong parts of the clams.

Developing A Taste For Geoduck In The Northwest

Jan 27, 2014

The Locavore movement is thriving in the Northwest -- with one big exception. When it comes to Puget Sound geoduck clams, the shellfish industry and local chefs are still trying to create a demand for them at home.

SEATTLE -- New details have been released about geoduck shipments that Chinese officials say contained high levels of inorganic arsenic and the toxin that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning, or PSP.

In response to their testing, the Chinese government instituted Dec. 3 a ban all U.S. harvested geoduck clams and other bivalve shellfish from Alaska, Washington, Oregon and Northern California.