gay rights

Steven Durant, left, and Ed Malick were both married to women before coming out as gay.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The Supreme Court ruling effectively legalizing same sex marriage nationwide has been seen as a huge victory for the lesbian, gay and transgender community.

But that doesn't mean LGBT people automatically have equal rights and protections - even in Washington state, where some equal protection laws have been on the books since 2006.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Peter Nicolas, professor of law at the University of Washington, about what the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage means for gay couples in Washington. Nicolas also looks at how the ruling might be challenged in states where gay marriage is banned.

Dan Savage and husband Terry Miller are seen in a 2011 photo.
Flickr photo/Chris Tse (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Marcie Sillman speaks with The Stranger's Dan Savage about the U.S. Supreme Court ruling giving same-sex couples across the United States the right to marry. 

Justice Mary Yu, at the Washington State Supreme Court's Temple of Justice.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marcie Sillman speaks with state Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu about her reaction to the legalization of same-sex marriage across the U.S. Yu presided over the first same-sex marriage in King County after statewide legalization in 2012. 

In Seoul, a gay pride parade 15 years in the running is at the center of heated controversy between LGBT groups and Christian activists, who threaten to do what it takes to stop the marchers.

The growing visibility of South Korea's gays and lesbians has led to louder opposition from church groups in recent years, and this weekend's event has organizers preparing for confrontation.

Following a firestorm of criticism, Republican governors in Indiana and Arkansas signed revised versions of their states' Religious Freedom Restoration bills Thursday night. In Indiana the language was adjusted, and in Arkansas it was significantly scaled back to more closely align with the federal law.

A Richland, Washington, florist will pay $1,000 in fines to the state. The flower shop had discriminated against a same-sex couple that wanted flowers for their wedding in 2013.

Geoffrey McGrath: The Inadvertent Spokesman For Gay Rights

Jan 29, 2015
Geoffrey McGrath delivers a petition bearing more than 125,000 signatures, urging Amazon to stop donating money to the Boy Scouts on May 21, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattleite Geoffrey McGrath about his path from a hiking/biking software engineer  to international spokesperson for gay rights after his membership from the Boy Scouts of America was revoked for his sexual orientation.

This story originally aired June 4, 2014.

Human Rights Watch is calling on the Russian government to condemn what is calls a surge in attacks against LGBT people in Russia.

The group says the dramatic rise in attacks followed a law approved by the Russian government in 2013, which Human Rights Watch says effectively legalized discrimination against Russia’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community in Russia.

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

UPDATE: 12/11/2014

In August, Uganda struck down a law which punished homosexuality with life in prison – but only on a technicality. Talcott Broadhead, who helps run the Friends New Underground Railroad that ferries LGBT people out of the country, said the celebration that followed was premature.

She said many were put into direct threat, beaten or killed after the repeal of the law. Some areas of the country are even seeing a movement of vigilante justice. “So the fear was no longer imprisonment so much as it was mob justice,” Broadhead said, returning to KUOW’s The Record with an update.

Voters in Pocatello, Idaho will decide the fate of the city’s non-discrimination ordinance Tuesday.

AP Photo/Michael Conroy

Ross Reynolds talks with Dave Zirin, sports editor at The Nation, about Michael Sam — the first openly gay football player to be drafted by a National Football League team.

Attorneys for four same-sex couples called Oregon's gay marriage ban a "state imposed badge of inferiority" during arguments in federal court Wednesday.

A federal judge in Oregon will not issue an immediate decision Wednesday in a lawsuit seeking to overturn the state's ban on same-sex marriage.

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