gay marriage

The U.S. Supreme Court Friday agreed to take up cases challenging gay marriage bans in Michigan, Ohio, Tennessee and Kentucky.

Idaho's governor vowed in his state of the state address Monday to continue the legal fight against gay marriage.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Marc Solomon, the national campaign director for Freedom To Marry and the author of the book "Winning Marriage," about Washington voters' legalizing gay marriage in November 2012.

In a 48-hour period this past October the number of states that allow same-sex marriage nearly doubled. As of this writing, thirty-five states allow same-sex couples to marry legally. Courts made that decision in twenty-four states. Legislatures made the call in another eight. And in three states, including Washington, the decision went to voters.

Marc Solomon has an extensive background in advocacy and public policy, but he wasn’t a natural pick to help lead the campaign to make same-sex marriage a reality. In his book, “Winning Marriage,” he tells the story of how a seemingly impossible goal — to win the freedom to marry for all Americans — came near reality in such a short period of time.

United Methodist pastor Frank Schaefer speaks during a news conference Tuesday, June 24, 2014, at First United Methodist Church of Germantown in Philadelphia.
AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Ross Reynolds talks with Frank Schaefer, author of "Defrocked: How A Father's Act of Love Shook the United Methodist Church," about his decision to officiate his son's same-sex marriage and the ensuing case over his dismissal from position as pastor in the Methodist church.

This segment originally aired October 20, 2014.

A federal appeals court Thursday upheld gay marriage bans in Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio and Michigan. It’s a break with the trend in most courts.

Bans on same-sex marriage in Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee were confirmed by a federal court Thursday, in a ruling that provides yet another shift in the legal fight over the issue.

The 2-1 decision handed down by the Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit comes after the four states had argued this summer that their voters had the authority to decide whether to ban marriage between a same-sex couple.

Religious conservatives around the country are rallying to the defense of a wedding chapel in north Idaho whose owners don’t want to perform gay marriages.

The Idaho attorney general has asked his legal staff to start looking at what implications gay marriage will have for the state.

Same-sex couples in Idaho can start getting married and have those marriages legally recognized by the state starting Wednesday morning.

Gay rights advocates are waiting for a ruling from a federal judge on whether same-sex couples can get married in Oregon.

"Attorney General Eric Holder announced Friday that the federal government will recognize the 900-plus same-sex marriages that took place in Utah during the two weeks when such unions were legal," NPR's Nina Totenberg writes for us.

That means those couples "will be eligible for all federal benefits," NPR's Carrie Johnson adds.

In a statement, Holder says that:

County officials who issue marriage licenses in Washington are gearing up for a possible influx of new applicants.

Hometown Heroes: The Conversation Talks To Notable Washingtonians

Aug 22, 2013
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Located in the best city in the best state, The Conversation has a lot of pride in the Pacific Northwest. We’ve got the best apples, planes, music, and yoga paddle board classes in the country.  This hour, we hear from Washingtonians who are making news and bringing fame to the Evergreen State.

KUOW Photo/Derek Wang

Same-sex couples around the Seattle area celebrated Wednesday’s historic ruling from the US Supreme Court that struck down some bans on gay marriage. The ruling spurred some couples to think about making wedding plans, now that they would receive new federal benefits. Others were inspired to apply for a marriage license, or even get married on the historic day. For many, Wednesday started out as a day of anticipation and anxiety and ended as a day of elation.

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