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If you've found that you are sensitive to gluten — the stretchy protein that makes wheat bread fluffy and pie crusts crisp — perhaps you've had to bear the brunt of the gluten-free backlash.

Winemaker Charles Smith
Courtesy of Charles Smith Wines

Ross Reynolds interviews Charles Smith, one of Washington state’s winemaking stars. He managed rock bands in Denmark before moving to Walla Walla, Washington in 1999. Despite knowing little about making wine, he’s gone on to become successful, even being named Wine Enthusiast magazine's wine maker of the year last year. 

In America, our food options are remarkably unaffected by the changing seasons. We just keep eating salad greens and tomatoes without regard to the onset of winter.

In most of the country, there's little chance that the greens we eat in the late fall and winter are locally grown.

But if there were greenhouses nearby, they could be. And in a small but growing number of places, local greenhouses are there.

Take Lower Makefield Township, Pa., right across the Delaware River from Trenton, N.J.

When Mae Lynn Reyes-Rodríguez was a graduate student in psychology at the University of Puerto Rico in the early 1990s, she learned there were no studies of how many Latinos suffered from anorexia, bulimia or binge eating disorder.

Editor's note: This story was originally posted last year. Some information was updated on Nov. 22, 2016.

The annual presidential turkey pardoning event at the White House is a strange one. This year is President Obama's eighth and last one, but he still seems confused.

"It is a little puzzling that I do this every year," Obama said in 2014.

"I know some folks think this tradition is a little silly," he said a year later. "I do not disagree."

The president has made the event something of an annual dad joke.

Move over, turkey. Step aside, stuffing.

Green Bean Casserole, an iconic Thanksgiving dish, turns 60 years old this year, and it's as popular as ever.

Love it or loathe it, the classic Midwestern casserole has come to mean more than just a mashup of processed food sitting next to the mashed potatoes.

Thanksgiving dinnr food
Flickr Photo/Dan Tentler (CC BY NC 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1SXlIOE

Ross Reynolds speaks with Kima Cargill, University of Washington Tacoma clinical psychology professor and author of “Psychology of Overeating: Food and the Culture of Consumerism."

Cargill sees overeating as related to consumerism: We want to consume less, yet we’re bombarded with messages to consume more.

As an example she points out the water bottle filling stations at SeaTac airport (a nudge to consume water) which have coffee shop ads that say “You deserve better than water” (a nudge to consume high-calorie coffee products).

If you are turkey-averse, turkeyphobic or just bored with the bird, fear not. We've got some other main dish ideas for you.

"What I think is cool is to put a center roast on the table that comes from the woods itself: something wild, something home-hunted, like venison," Amy Thielen, Minnesotan and author of The New Midwestern Table, tells All Things Considered's Ari Shapiro. Deer, says Thielen, is "one of those secret underground proteins in the American meat-eating story."

Remember the headlines a few weeks back, when the World Health Organization categorized red and processed meats as cancer-causing?

Turns out, the techniques you use to prepare your meat seem to play into this risk.

'Week in Review' panel Joni Balter, Eli Sanders, Knute Berger, Bill Radke and Nick Bond.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Governor Jay Inslee puts Washington at the center of a national debate over Syrian refugees. The FDA says GMO salmon is safe for you and safe for the fish, but will you eat it? And if you're a Democrat but not a socialist, how progressive are you, really?

Bill Radke reviews the week's news with Crosscut's Knute Berger, The Stranger's Eli Sanders, Joni Balter of Seattle Channel's Civic Cocktail and  special guests state climatologist Nick Bond and Council of American-Islamic Relations-Washington executive director Arsalan Bukhari.

Colistin is the antibiotic that doctors use as a last resort to wipe out dangerous bacteria.

"It's really been kept as the last drug in the locker when all else has failed," says Dr. Jim Spencer, a senior lecturer in microbiology at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom.

The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved the first genetically modified salmon as safe for human consumption. The approval concludes nearly 20 years of reviews looking at whether the fish are safe to eat and what environmental impacts they'll have. Here are the answers to some key questions about these fish:

What's different about these salmon?

A genetically engineered Atlantic salmon. AquaBounty, the company that created it, says the fish is safe to eat. The FDA agrees. The question is whether consumers will be persuaded.
Courtesy AquaBounty Technologies

It could soon be on your dinner plate: the first genetically modified food animal approved for Americans’ consumption. The federal Food and Drug Administration OK'd sale of GMO salmon on Thursday.

Food scientists at Washington State University have an unusual new partner to help them evaluate drinks, medicines and sweeteners. It's called the "electronic tongue.”

When President Obama announced the details of the Trans-Pacific Partnership on Thursday — and released them on Medium.com — there was a lot of talk about labor, the environment and manufacturing. But trade deals have a way of changing the way we eat, too.

Sesame seared Ahi tuna at Elliot's in Seattle. This was taken in 2011, how has the city's food evolved?
Flickr Photo/Mubnii M. (CC BY ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1kdJiMj

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Seattle restaurateur Rachel Yang about how the tech industry and increased diversity are changing the cuisine of the city.  

In the new Meryl Streep period movie Suffragette, Englishwomen march on the streets, smash shop windows and stage sit-ins to demand the vote. Less well-known is that across the pond, a less cinematic resistance was being staged via that most humble vehicle: the cookbook.

Between 1886, when the first American suffragist cookbook was published, and 1920, when the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution granted women the right to vote, there were at least a half-dozen cookbooks published by suffragette associations in the country.

Jeff Lahti, microbiologist at the Department of Health tests samples for E. coli.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

There are now 25 confirmed cases of E. coli in Washington state, 12 more in Oregon. Most of the cases are linked to Chipotle Restaurants.

Officials have identified the strain that’s responsible for the outbreak: E. coli 026. Washington state health officer Dr. Kathy Lofy said this strain produces Shiga toxins, which can cause serious illness, including sever abdominal cramps, diarrhea which is often bloody, vomiting, kidney damage and other issues.

alcohol beer taps
Flickr Photo/Arvind Grover (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1SmmftY

David Hyde talks with Fircrest resident and City Councilmember Hunter George about why he wants to end alcohol prohibition in Washington's only dry town.

tip restaurant money
Flickr Photo/Eric Heath (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1N9PRX1

Chef Renee Erickson says she was trying to close pay gaps among her employees when she eliminated tipping at her Seattle restaurants.

But she told KUOW’s David Hyde that the change also might help battle another problem in restaurants: sexism.

Is That Wild Salmon Really Wild?

Nov 2, 2015
How do you tell what salmon is truly wild?
Flickr Photo/Wally Gobetz (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1k65tUx

David Hyde speaks with Mike Cenci, deputy chief law enforcement officer for the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, about the dangers of seafood mislabeling and how consumers can make informed purchases. 

Colorized scanning electron micrograph of Escherichia coli, grown in culture and adhered to a cover slip.
Flickr Photo/NIAID (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1MtIngO

The sleuthing is under way to figure out what has sickened at least 22 people in an E. coli outbreak linked to Chipotle restaurants.

Health officials said Monday that they’re still unsure which food is responsible, but the number of cases is expected to rise beyond the 19 in Washington and three in Oregon reported so far. Seven people have been hospitalized in Washington, one in Oregon.

Not long ago, I tried a new kind of Doritos tinted a shade of orange that I'll wager does not exist in the vegetable world. These JACKED Ranch Dipped Hot Wings Flavored chips were so intensely tinted that after four chips, I had to stop eating them. My mind simply wouldn't accept them as food.

What was behind that exceedingly bold hue of orange? Red 40, Blue 1, Yellow 6, Red 40 Lake, Yellow 6 Lake and Yellow 5 Lake, according to the label.

Chipotle Mexican Grill is temporarily closing more than 40 restaurants in and around Seattle and Portland, Ore., as health officials investigate an E. coli outbreak that has gotten at least 22 people sick.

USA Today reports:

Corin Mochnick

Elementary students in Seattle Public Schools get far less time to eat lunch than district policy requires, according to a study by University of Washington graduate students. That confirms what parent activists have long reported.

Pumpkins of almost any variety have flesh high in fiber and beta carotene. Their seeds, delicious when toasted or baked, can be rich in potassium and protein.

But we didn't eat the vast majority of the 1.91 billion pounds of pumpkins grown in the U.S. in 2014, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Instead we, of course, carved faces into them, set them aglow and perhaps left them to sit outside for days. And then we tossed them.

The late Vincent Price was a horror film icon. With perfect elocution, he delivered creepy invitations to haunted houses in such movies as House of Wax (1953) and House on Haunted Hill (1959). He was a regular on TV's Hollywood Squares and a villain on the 1960s TV series Batman. Price's deep voice narrated Michael Jackson's 1982 music video for "Thriller" and was an inspiration to director Tim Burton. But Price was also a foodie.

A group funded by the grocery industry filed an initiative petition Wednesday that would allow Oregonians to buy liquor in most grocery stores.

'Apple beauty contest'
Flickr Photo/quilldancer (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1kbQWWP

David Hyde spoke with Yakima Valley apple grower Ric Valicoff about increasingly hot and dry conditions in Central Washington and how that could affect the future of the fruit tree industry. 

Would you be able to tell if the wild Alaskan sockeye salmon you ordered for dinner was swapped out for a less expensive piece of farm-raised salmon?

For the observant, the color difference between the two would likely be the first giveaway. (Sockeye has a deeper red-orange hue.) Or maybe you'd notice the disparity in the thickness of fillet. (Sockeye is flatter and less steaky in appearance.)

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