food

'Apple beauty contest'
Flickr Photo/quilldancer (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1kbQWWP

David Hyde spoke with Yakima Valley apple grower Ric Valicoff about increasingly hot and dry conditions in Central Washington and how that could affect the future of the fruit tree industry. 

Would you be able to tell if the wild Alaskan sockeye salmon you ordered for dinner was swapped out for a less expensive piece of farm-raised salmon?

For the observant, the color difference between the two would likely be the first giveaway. (Sockeye has a deeper red-orange hue.) Or maybe you'd notice the disparity in the thickness of fillet. (Sockeye is flatter and less steaky in appearance.)

According to an industry trade group, sales of alternatives to modern wheat are growing at double-digit annual rates.

The World Health Organization has deemed that processed meats — such as bacon, sausages and hot dogs — can cause cancer.

In addition, the WHO says red meats including beef, pork, veal and lamb are "probably carcinogenic" to people.

Beer taps at Elysian Brewing Company.
Flickr Photo/ctj71081 (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1KrWnGp

David Hyde sits down with Dick Cantwell, co-founder and former head brewer of Elysian Brewing Company, to discuss what the merger of the two biggest beer companies, Anheuser Busch InBev and SABMiller, means for the craft beer industry.

The parade of fast-food companies promising to sell meat from animals that never received antibiotics just got significantly longer. Subway, the ubiquitous sandwich chain, is following the lead of Chipotle, Panera, Chick-fil-A and McDonalds, with its promise Tuesday that its meat suppliers gradually will go antibiotic-free.

KUOW photo/Anna King

David Hyde speaks with Northwest News Network reporter Anna King about what kind of season Washington's wine industry saw this year. 

More and more schools are trying to serve meals with food that was grown nearby. The U.S. Department of Agriculture just released some statistics documenting the trend.

The World Is Not As Hungry As You Might Think

Oct 16, 2015

Back in 1798, English philosopher Thomas Malthus predicted that the world would eventually run out of food for its growing population.

"The power of population is so superior to the power in the earth to produce subsistence for man, that premature death must in some shape or other visit the human race," he wrote.

The average American eats hundreds of pounds of meat every year. But after years of putting more and more meat on our plates, it seems we’re starting to see a slow-down.

Dietary recommendations are shifting as we learn more about what’s healthy to eat. American shoppers are taking new information to the grocery store and making new choices at the meat counter.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Kristofor Husted of Harvest Public Media reports that U.S. livestock farmers are listening.

Every five years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department Health and Human Services convene an advisory committee to develop dietary guidelines based on the latest scientific and medical research. The 2015 Dietary Guidelines won't be released until later this year, but they're already generating debate.

Big food companies are buying up small ones. Honest Tea is now part of Coca-Cola. The French company Danone controls Stonyfield yogurt. Hormel owns Applegate natural and organic meats.

Paul Prudhomme, the internationally renowned Louisiana chef who popularized Cajun and Creole cuisine around the world, died Thursday morning. He was 75.

It's hard to overstate Prudhomme's influence on Cajun and Creole food. JoAnn Clevenger, owner of Upperline restaurant in New Orleans, says Prudhomme modernized it but kept the distinctive flavors.

In Napa, Calif., a company called Free Flow Wines fills and dispenses reusable wine kegs, which are used by restaurants and bars for serving wine on draft. Every month, the company rinses and refills about 10,000 of the stainless steel casks, each of which eliminates the need for 26 clunky wine bottles.

This is a small win for the environment, since glass bottles are heavy and require energy to ship.

Updated at 10:52 a.m.

When it comes to eating well, should we consider the health of both our bodies and the planet?

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