food

Seasonal Vegetables
3:17 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Getting Fresh With Ross And Sheryl: Sunchokes And Parsnips

Sheryl Wiser of the Cascade Harvest Coalition recommends picking out parsnips that are firm and dry.
Courtesy of Sheryl Wiser

Ross Reynolds talks with Sheryl Wiser of the Cascade Harvest Coalition about what is fresh at the farmer's market this week.

Child Nutrition
8:32 am
Tue January 21, 2014

Why Letting Kids Serve Themselves May Be Worth The Mess

Adults tend to overestimate how much small children can eat, a child development researcher says.
Getty Images/iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 3:58 pm

When it comes to feeding little kids, adults know best. But some nutritionists now argue that children could also benefit from a bit of autonomy at mealtimes.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends that parents let kids as young as 2 years old serve themselves at home. And in 2011, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics advised that child care providers should serve meals "family-style" — present kids with a few different dishes and allow them to take what they want.

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Washington Legislature
10:16 am
Fri January 17, 2014

Genetically-Modified Labeling Fight In Washington Continues With New Bills

Washington lawmakers will hear a bill to label genetically engineered salmon. The proposed bill would also ban transgenic salmon production in the state.
Credit Flickr Photo/Katrine Kaarsemaker

When Rep. Cary Condotta campaigned for labeling genetically modified food last fall, he noticed reactions were different depending on the type of food: fish or plant. “When you start talking about modifying animals to grow faster and larger, boy, they light up,” he said. “People go, really? They’re not doing that, are they?”

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Hint: Not Here
7:51 am
Wed January 15, 2014

Where In The World Is The Best Place For Healthy Eating?

The U.K. has plenty of fresh produce available, such as these vegetables on display at a garden show in Southport, England. But these healthy options cost more in the U.K. than in any other country in Western Europe.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 1:03 pm

The Dutch are known for their lax drug laws, tall statures and proficient language skills.

Perhaps we should add stellar eating habits to that list, as well.

The Netherlands ranked as the easiest country in the world in which to find a balanced, nutritious diet, the advocacy group Oxfam reported Tuesday.

France and Switzerland shared the second slot. And Western Europe nearly swept the top 20 positions, with Australia just edging into a tie for 8th.

Where did the U.S. land?

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Author Interview
4:30 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Sustainability Guru Talks Local Eating

Vicki Robin's book "Blessing the Hand That Feeds Us"

Ross Reynolds talks with Vicki Robin about her latest book, "Blessing the Hand That Feeds Us: What Eating Closer to Home Can Teach Us About Food, Community, and Our Place on Earth.”  In it, she writes about an experiment she did in 2010 to eat only locally-sourced food within 10 miles of her Whidbey Island home. She is a local leader in the sustainable living movement and one of the founders of Sustainable Seattle.

Politics Behind Science
9:50 am
Fri January 10, 2014

A Green-Movement Website Shakes Up The Debate Over GMOs

After Grist's six-month-long series on genetically modified foods, some loyal readers accused the site of changing directions in the debate.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 9:52 am

A 26-part series on genetically modified food was not Nathanael Johnson's idea. And he didn't realize it would take six months, either.

Last year, Johnson was hired as the new food writer for Grist, a website for environmental news and opinion. Grist's editor, Scott Rosenberg, was waiting with an assignment: Dig into the controversy over GMOs.

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Food
2:44 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

What It Takes To Grow A Meal

Flickr Photo/The Heathman Kirkland

Marcie Sillman talks with Kurt Timmermeister about his newest book, "Growing a Feast: The Chronicle of a Farm-to-Table Meal."

Bycatch
1:00 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Whales, Dolphins Are Collateral Damage In Our Taste For Seafood

A sperm whale entangled in a drift net. A report says commercial fisheries around the world kill or injure 650,000 mammals a year.
Alberto Romero Marine Photobank

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 7:29 pm

Hundreds of thousands of marine mammals are injured or killed every year by fishermen around the world. And because most seafood in the U.S. is imported, that means our fish isn't as dolphin-friendly as you might expect.

Under pressure from conservation groups, federal regulators are preparing to tighten import standards to better protect marine mammals.

There was a time, more than 40 years ago, when U.S. fishermen killed millions of dolphins while fishing for tuna. After a public backlash, fishermen figured out how to minimize that so-called bycatch.

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Health
4:07 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

The Fundamentals Of The Food Lover's Cleanse

Flickr Photo/The Greatist

Marcie Sillman talks with chef Sara Dickerman about the food lover's cleanse.

Cape Dogfish
2:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Why The Cod On Cape Cod Now Comes From Iceland

With local cod so scarce, Chef Toby Hill of Lyric Restaurant in Yarmouth Port, Mass., tries out a dogfish salad — served here with garlic aioli on toast — instead. Dogfish is still plentiful in New England waters, but wholesale fisheries say there's not much demand for it in the U.S.
Christine Hochkeppel Courtesy of Cape Cod Times

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 11:53 am

Good luck finding local cod in Cape Cod, Mass.

The fish once sustained New England's fishing industry, but in recent years, regulators have imposed severe catch limits on cod, and the fish remain scarce.

"I've never seen cod fishing this bad," says Greg Walinsky, who has been fishing on Cape Cod for more than 30 years. "It looks to me like it's over. And I can't catch any codfish."

It's so bad, many fishermen say, that for the first time, they cannot catch enough cod to even reach shrinking government quotas.

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Prison
12:53 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Food As Punishment: Giving U.S. Inmates 'The Loaf' Persists

Lisa Brown for NPR

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 12:49 pm

In many prisons and jails across the U.S., punishment can come in the form of a bland, brownish lump. Known as nutraloaf, or simply "the loaf," it's fed day after day to inmates who throw food or, in some cases, get violent. Even though it meets nutritional guidelines, civil rights activists urge against the use of the brick-shaped meal.

Tasteless food as punishment is nothing new: Back in the 19th century, prisoners were given bread and water until they'd earned with good behavior the right to eat meat and cheese.

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Bubbles
11:15 am
Tue December 31, 2013

Does Champagne Actually Get You Drunk Faster?

Each bottle of Champagne contains around 50 million bubbles. But will any of them accelerate the inebriation process?
Victor Bezrukov Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 12:39 pm

Every time I spend New Year's Eve with my mom, she tells me the same thing: "Be careful with that Champagne, honey. The bubbles go straight to the head. And it won't be pretty tomorrow."

Thanks, Mom. Glad you're looking after me after all these years.

But is she right?

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Ask The Dietitian
3:31 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

New Year's Resolution Advice From Dietitian Mary Purdy

Dietitian Mary Purdy.
Courtesy of Mary Purdy.

Marcie Sillman discusses advice to help you stick to your New Years resolution with nutritionist and registered dietitian Mary Purdy.

Cooking
3:23 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

Sleep Soundly, We've Got Holiday Breakfast Ideas

Flickr Photo/Gabriel Li

Marcie Sillman talks with chef Sara Dickerman about what to serve your overnight holiday guests for breakfast.

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Environment
7:36 am
Thu December 19, 2013

Darigold, EPA Reach Settlement In Chlorine Gas Leak

Darigold has agreed to a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, after the milk-producing company failed to report a chlorine gas release last year. Darigold will pay $42,000 in the settlement.
Flickr Creative Commons: www.bluewaikiki.com

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 3:54 pm

One of the Northwest’s biggest dairy producers has agreed to a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. That’s after the milk co-op failed to report a chlorine gas release that required medical treatment for a dozen people.

Chlorine gas is highly toxic. It can make your eyes, nose and mouth burn. If you breathe the gas, it can cause respiratory problems or death.

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