Summer time is berry time at the farmers market.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds and Seattle Times food writer Rebekah Denn visit the Phinney Ridge farmers market and discover a bounty of berries.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Nobody really likes to be graded. Especially when you don't get an A.

Some organic farmers are protesting a new grading system for produce and flowers that's coming into force at Whole Foods. They say it devalues the organic label and could become an "existential threat."

Jeannie Yandel talks with Pike Brewing Company vice president Drew Gillespie about the company's new, 100 percent local terroir beer.

In the last couple of years, we've detected a faint buzz about crispy crickets and crunchy mealworms. Companies pedaling scorpion lollipops and peanut butter-and-jelly protein bars made with cricket flour have thrust their wares into our hands and mailboxes.

At least 2,500 years ago, tea, as we know it, was born.

Back then, it was a medicinal concoction blended with herbs, seeds and forest leaves in the mountains of southwest China. Gradually, as manners of processing and drinking tea were refined, it became imbued with artistic, religious, and cultural notes. Under the Tang Dynasty (AD 618–907), the apogee of ancient Chinese prosperity, the drink involved ritual, etiquette and specific utensils. During this period of splendor, the first book dedicated solely to tea was written by Lu Yü.

Ignatius Agon practices his greeting: "OK, good evening ladies and gentlemen. My name is Ignatius and I am going to guide you into the dark."

It's Monday, and the first day of training for a new restaurant opening this month in Kenya. Diners will be served in the dark. They'll have to find their food with their forks and eat it in a pitch black room.

And the waiters are blind.

food delivery
Flickr Photo/Mark Turnauckas (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Todd Bishop of Geekwire about their investigation into the practices of the online restaurant delivery service OrderAhead. 

How To Cook A Geoduck

May 18, 2015
Kevin Bartlett of Taylor Shellfish in Seattle shows David George Gordon, the bug chef, how to cook geoduck.
KCTS9/Aileen Imperial

Geoducks (that's pronounced gooey-duck) are a shellfish delicacy, fetching about $30 a pound here in Seattle. But how do you cook these curious creatures? Kevin Bartlett of Taylor Shellfish at Melrose Market in Seattle showed us how. 

Here's the video; we also provide a step-by-step guide with photos below. 

Flickr photo/Jason Walsh (CC BY 2.0)


David Hyde talks to seafood economics expert Gunnar Knapp about why Copper River salmon is so expensive.  

Flickr Photo/Seattle.roamer (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Mycologist Paul Stamets calls fungi “the soil magicians of nature.” He says they were the first organisms to come to land 1.3 billion years ago.

Stamets has spent his career searching for ways to learn from nature’s secrets to heal humans and the planet. One focus of his research is Northwest mycelium. 

New Seattle Co-op Is All About Beer

May 14, 2015
Flying Bike Cooperative hopes to open their doors late June.
Courtesy of Erinn Hale

Kim Malcolm talks with Kevin Forhan, head brewer of Seattle's first cooperative brewery, Flying Bike, about making beer with over 1,000 bosses. 

Thoa Nguyen competes on "Beat Bobby Flay."
Courtesy of the Food Network

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle chef Thoa Nguyen about her long and winding path path to successful Seattle restaurateur. Nguyen filmed a segment on Beat Bobby Flay for the Food Network which will be airing May 14.

Sheep ranchers, feedlot owners, and processors in states like Colorado, Nebraska and Illinois are banking on America becoming a more diverse place.

Specifically, they want American Muslims to buy more of their lamb.

Fishmonger Andrew Wichmann says cruise ship traffic is great for Seattle but doesn't do much for him directly. They can't bring food onboard. "We wouldn't survive without local clientele."
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

The cruise ship docked at 7 a.m.

By 8 a.m., Danielle Smith and her family were at Pike Place Market, walking through the stalls. They had 48 hours to enjoy the city before flying home to Atlanta.