food

Compost, Seattleites! (Or Risk Being Fined)

Sep 22, 2014
Flickr Photo/Dianne Yee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It'll be a busy day at Seattle city hall Monday. Mayor Ed Murray is proposing his first city budget since he was elected last fall.

Among other things, the mayor is expected to announce funding for more police officers and for his preschool proposal.

Further down the agenda, though, is a smaller item that could add up to something big.

On September 28, several hundred people are expected to gather at a vineyard near Salem, Oregon, to chew on the problem of invasive species.

Seattle's Pike Place Market.
Flickr Photo/girl_onthe_les (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Here in the Northwest we take pride in our regional seafood industry, but details about the big picture of seafood distribution may surprise or appall you. Our guest this week on Speakers Forum is Paul Greenberg, author of the book “American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood.”

The U.S., which controls more ocean than any other nation, imports 91 percent of its seafood.

As the Northwest is bathed in autumn’s golden light, wineries across the region are harvesting, crushing grapes and making wine full bore. This year’s fruit looks petite and powerful.

Are you finding it tougher to follow conversations in a noisy restaurant? Or does it seem like people are mumbling when you speak with them?

These are two questions commonly used to screen for hearing loss, which affects more than one-third of people over age 65, according to the National Institutes of Health.

So, what to do to cut the risk?

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle chef and restaurateur Renee Erickson about her first cookbook, "A Boat, a Whale, & a Walrus: Menus and Stories,” written with Jess Thomson. Erickson talks about going from an art major at the University of Washington to running four restaurants, The Whale Wins, the Boat Street Café, Barnacle, and the Walrus and the Carpenter, an acclaimed oyster bar.

Flickr Photo/Debbie R

American as apple pie, the expression goes.

Except that the only apple native to North America is the crab apple, said Rowan Jacobsen, author of “Apples of Uncommon Character.” He spoke with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman about apple history – and where you can find the most delicious varieties.

Courtesy of Sheryl Wiser

Ross Reynolds speaks with Sheryl Wiser of the Cascade Harvest Coalition about what's fresh in local farmer's markets this weekend. Wiser tells us about pickles and other specialties at some of the more than 100 farmers markets in Western Washington.

You like soft and chewy. He likes thin and crispy. If only there were a way to bake chocolate chip cookies to please everyone.

There is! And, no, it's not Martha Stewart's way. It's science.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

People usually go to Skagit Valley for tulips and berries. But here’s a little known fact: The region also grows grains. Grains used to be grown mainly as cover crop and often shipped out of state. These days Skagit Valley is seeing a grain revival, thanks to a local researcher.

If your experience with whole grain bread takes you back to the hard brick loaves of the '70s, Stephen Jones at the Bread Lab wants to change that.

Hypoallergenic Nuts: A Solution To Nut Allergies?

Aug 25, 2014

It was just a baby-tooth-sized nibble of a peanut butter sandwich, but it was enough to send 18-month-old Gus into a violent coughing fit. Within minutes, his skin erupted into hives and his eyelids swelled shut. His mother, Laura Hass, rushed him from their Palm Beach, Fla., home to the ER. At a red light, she glanced in the rearview mirror — her son's head hung limply to one side, his cries replaced by silence.

Despite all the cheerleading for healthy eating, Americans still eat only about 1 serving of fruit per day, on average. And our veggie consumption, according to an analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls short, too.

Cascade Harvest Coalition

Farmers markets in the Puget Sound region are abundant with in-season foods this time of year. But all that choice can be a little overwhelming. KUOW's Ross Reynolds talks with Cascade Harvest Coalition's Sheryl Wiser about how to plan your farmers market shopping: think about making a grilled salad.

Everything in Alaska is a little bit bigger — even the produce. A 138-pound cabbage, 65-pound cantaloupe and 35-pound broccoli are just a few of the monsters that have sprung forth from Alaska's soil in recent years.

At the annual Alaska State Fair, which opens Thursday in Palmer, the public will have the chance to gawk at giants like these as they're weighed for competition.

When we picture hungry Americans, we may see the faces of children, or single moms. But many of the people who struggle to fill their bellies are beyond age 65. Some of them are even malnourished, a condition that sets them up for all kinds of other health risks, like falling.

Malnutrition may go undetected — by the general public and by doctors — until the seniors show up in the emergency room, often for an injury or other reason.

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