food

Big food companies are buying up small ones. Honest Tea is now part of Coca-Cola. The French company Danone controls Stonyfield yogurt. Hormel owns Applegate natural and organic meats.

Paul Prudhomme, the internationally renowned Louisiana chef who popularized Cajun and Creole cuisine around the world, died Thursday morning. He was 75.

It's hard to overstate Prudhomme's influence on Cajun and Creole food. JoAnn Clevenger, owner of Upperline restaurant in New Orleans, says Prudhomme modernized it but kept the distinctive flavors.

In Napa, Calif., a company called Free Flow Wines fills and dispenses reusable wine kegs, which are used by restaurants and bars for serving wine on draft. Every month, the company rinses and refills about 10,000 of the stainless steel casks, each of which eliminates the need for 26 clunky wine bottles.

This is a small win for the environment, since glass bottles are heavy and require energy to ship.

Updated at 10:52 a.m.

When it comes to eating well, should we consider the health of both our bodies and the planet?

Julia Child was tired of hearing people complain about salt, cholesterol and fat. Try moderation and exercise, she said. This photo was taken in 1992, two years after her interview with KUOW's Ross Reynolds.
AP Photo/Jon Chase

Julia Child was mad.

“I think the word ‘healthy’ and the word ‘light’ are really kind of meaningless,” the renowned cook told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds in a prescient 1990 interview. “There are no bad or good foods; they are just healthy and unhealthy ways of using them.”

Plant breeders, Northwest chefs and farmers are co-developing innovative new vegetables and grains. The bounty was sampled a tasting party in Portland Monday night.

Harvest is revving up at Washington’s apple orchards. But this year the fruit they’re picking is smaller -- and there is less of it.

Apples on one of the original trees in Piper's Orchard. The orchard was planted more than 100 years ago.
KUOW photo/Marcie Sillman

Seattle's Carkeek Park has a secret.

Hidden in plain sight, on a steep south-facing hillside, just a few hundred yards down a trail from the Environmental Learning Center, you’ll find Piper’s Orchard.

For several years now, a popular purveyor of tacos has suggested that Americans who get the munchies late at night are participating in a contemporary dining ritual called "Fourthmeal."

Even Poor Countries End Up Wasting Tons Of Food

Sep 28, 2015

The fact that a huge amount of food is wasted each year will be no surprise to anybody in the West. What might come as a surprise is that a large percentage of global food waste occurs in developing countries — primarily because of poor infrastructure and dysfunctional distribution networks.

As much as half of the food grown or produced in the developing world simply never makes it to market. And that loss is costing billions of dollars and blighting countless lives.

The wealth gap in America manifests itself not just in our pocketbooks but also in our bellies: The poor are eating less nutritious food than everyone else.

So concludes a new review of 25 studies published between 2003 and 2014 that looked at the food spending and quality of diets of participants in SNAP, the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as food stamps.

Chef Rachel Yang holds an escarole -- 'Bigger than my head!' -- from the Wallinford Farmers Market.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel talks with chef and Seattle restaurant owner Rachel Yang about picking the freshest berries, stone fruit, and vegetables for pickles at the Wallingford Farmers' Market.  

Marcie Sillman talks to book maven Nancy Pearl about an unusual take on the late culinary guru Julia Child's life: a graphic biography from Jessie Hartland called "Bon Appetit! The Delicious Life of Julia Child."

In California's blazing hot San Joaquin Valley, millions of pistachio trees are now buried in clusters of small pinkish-green fruits — what would seem like a bumper crop.

But for many growers of the popular nut, the season is shaping into a disaster. Jeff Schmiederer, who farms 700 acres of family-owned pistachio trees on the western side of the San Joaquin Valley, says about 90 percent of the nuts he has sampled from his trees are hollow — what growers call "blanks."

Two cookie varieties produced by Jody Hall's new venture, The Goodship Company.
Facebook Photo/The Goodship Company

Jeannie Yandel sits down with Cupcake Royale founder Jody Hall to talk about her new venture, The Goodship Company, which produces edible marijuana products. Hall explains why she got into the pot industry and how she hopes to change the culture of marijuana. 

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