food

Beloved sandwhich shop Paseo closed suddenly this week, leading to a lot of foodie grief in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Rocky Yeh (CC-BY-NC-ND

A beloved Cuban sandwich shop falls apart. A gun-rights rally is coming to Olympia. Should police bother to find who broke into your car? Is our lieutenant governor a slacker? And what would you put into a Washington state time capsule?

Bill Radke is with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Northwest News Network’s Phyllis Fletcher and LiveWire’s Luke Burbank to answer these questions.

Joshua McNichols / KUOW

King County Public Health wants to increase the fees it charges vendors who sell some kinds of food at public markets, including fresh cooked food and raw meats. Market organizers say the higher fees could eventually force some smaller markets to close.

There have been no shortage of headlines recounting the legal kerfuffle unfolding over the definition of mayonnaise.

Global food giant Unilever, which owns the ubiquitous Hellmann's brand, is suing Hampton Creek, the maker of of Just Mayo, an egg-free spread made from peas, sorghum and other plants.

The fight against nuisance critters is increasingly being fought at the dinner table. We've reported on so-called invasivores eating everything from Asian carp (battered and fried!) to wild pigs (Russian boar carpaccio, anyone?) as a means of reducing pesky populations.

Paseo Closes: What's Your Reaction?

Nov 12, 2014
Flickr Photo/Justin.II

  Paseo – Seattle's world famous Caribbean sandwich shop – closed its doors yesterday. 

Signs outside the Fremont and Ballard locations blamed "unfortunate circumstances."

Army Eyes 3-D Printed Food For Soldiers

Nov 4, 2014

Army scientists have spent decades concocting meals that last without refrigeration and survive high-altitude airdrops. And now, the Army is eyeing a new form of cooking: 3-D printing! Yes, food that comes fresh out of a printer, for our troops.

Lauren Oleksyk, a food technologist leading the team at the Army's Natick research center, lays out the vision.

Imagine soldiers who are strapped, head to toe, with sensors that measure if they're high or low in potassium or cholesterol.

Flickr Photo/Jess Judge (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to Dan Pashman, creator and host of the podcast The Sporkful, about his new book: "Eat More Better: How To Make Every Bite More Delicious."

Flickr Photo/Becky Striepe

Ross Reynolds talks to Liam Moriarty, reporter and producer at Jefferson Public Radio, about Measure 92 in Oregon which would require GMO labeling on foods that have genetically modified ingredients.

An Oregon chef is asking if you have the guts to celebrate World Tripe Day on Friday.

When shopping for meat, sometimes the options can be dizzying — what's the difference between an organic, free-range or air-chilled chicken? The Cook's Illustrated Meat Book offers insights.

It's about how to shop for, store, season and cook meat and poultry — and how to prevent contaminating your kitchen with bacteria from the raw meat.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Marian Neuhouser, a nutrition researcher at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle and co-author of a study that examines the role your genes play in your tolerance to caffeine.

Ross Reynolds talks to Langdon Cook, author of the book "The Mushroom Hunters: On The Trail Of An Underground America," about fall foraging.

It may be difficult to eat our way out of the invasive species problem, but it can be satisfying to try.

Many millennials — people born after 1980 — have embraced vintage items: vinyl records, thick-framed glasses ... and now, dietary laws.

"I'm 21 years old, and, yes, I do keep kosher," says Lisa Faulds.

She says she ate whatever she wanted growing up: "bacon, ham, all that fun stuff. Seafood, shellfish."

But that all stopped a few months ago.

According to a 2013 Pew Research Center study, nearly a fourth of millennial Jews are keeping kosher.

Genetically modified wheat has been found at a university research center in Montana. That news Friday came as a federal investigation into a similar case in Oregon concludes with few answers.

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