The wealth gap in America manifests itself not just in our pocketbooks but also in our bellies: The poor are eating less nutritious food than everyone else.

So concludes a new review of 25 studies published between 2003 and 2014 that looked at the food spending and quality of diets of participants in SNAP, the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as food stamps.

Chef Rachel Yang holds an escarole -- 'Bigger than my head!' -- from the Wallinford Farmers Market.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel talks with chef and Seattle restaurant owner Rachel Yang about picking the freshest berries, stone fruit, and vegetables for pickles at the Wallingford Farmers' Market.  

Marcie Sillman talks to book maven Nancy Pearl about an unusual take on the late culinary guru Julia Child's life: a graphic biography from Jessie Hartland called "Bon Appetit! The Delicious Life of Julia Child."

In California's blazing hot San Joaquin Valley, millions of pistachio trees are now buried in clusters of small pinkish-green fruits — what would seem like a bumper crop.

But for many growers of the popular nut, the season is shaping into a disaster. Jeff Schmiederer, who farms 700 acres of family-owned pistachio trees on the western side of the San Joaquin Valley, says about 90 percent of the nuts he has sampled from his trees are hollow — what growers call "blanks."

Two cookie varieties produced by Jody Hall's new venture, The Goodship Company.
Facebook Photo/The Goodship Company

Jeannie Yandel sits down with Cupcake Royale founder Jody Hall to talk about her new venture, The Goodship Company, which produces edible marijuana products. Hall explains why she got into the pot industry and how she hopes to change the culture of marijuana. 

There's a lot of evidence that the meals school cafeterias are serving have gotten healthier since new federal nutrition standards were rolled out.

Holly Smith, Holly's son Oliver, and farmer Bill Davidson at the Ballard Farmers' Market.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel talks with Cafe Juanita chef Holly Smith about shopping for fresh nectarines at the Ballard Farmers Market. 

We're not shy about our affinity for the Cherokee Purple, a purplish package of sweet, acid and savory tomato greatness.

A recent outbreak of Salmonella in frozen tuna might have sushi lovers wondering if it's safe to eat that raw fish.

The outbreak in question began in California in March. All told, it sickened 65 people in 11 states. There were 35 cases in California, with another 18 in Arizona and New Mexico. The rest of the cases were scattered across the country, including four in Minnesota.

Courtesy of Coalo Valley Farms

Eating bugs might sound like something you’d do if you lost a bet. But a few companies have cropped up that are marketing insect powder as a nutritional supplement.

Requiring little food or water, bugs also have a low-carbon footprint, a fact that makes them very attractive here in drought-stricken California.

But could cricket-packed cookies and milkshakes be the next big food trend?

Tomatoes at Queen Anne Farmers Market.
Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds goes to the Queen Anne Farmers Market to talk with cook, author and chef Becky Selengut about what's fresh for your table. Hear a simple recipe for using delicious tomatoes. Selengut's books include Good Fish and Shroom: Mind-Bendingly Good Recipes for Cultivated and Wild Mushrooms.

There's a new candidate in the century-old quest for perfect, guiltless sweetness.

I encountered it at the annual meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, a combination of Super Bowl, Mecca, and Disneyland for the folks who put the processing in processed food.

One of the most prestigious names in health care is taking a stand on food.

This week, Cleveland Clinic announced it would sever ties with McDonald's. As of Sept. 18, the McDonald's branch located in the Cleveland Clinic cafeteria will turn off its fryers and close its doors for good. Its lease will not be renewed.

Fortunately for those of us who are suckers for novelty, every year fruits and vegetables seem to come in more bewitching colors, shapes and flavors. In recent years, we've been transfixed by Glass Gem Corn and the vibrant orange Turkish eggplant.

Wild Yeast Can Transform Wine - With Some Risk

Aug 16, 2015

Winemaking is about more than just grapes. They need something else to ferment into alcohol: a microscopic fungus, yeast. People have been fermenting grapes for thousands of years using wild yeasts that grow in the vineyard. Researchers at Washington State University want to know more about these species.