Two years ago, in the middle of the night, a fire broke out in a commercial building on the northern edge of the city of Dallas. It destroyed a small yogurt company called Three Happy Cows.

Two months later, Edgar Diaz, the founder of Three Happy Cows, confessed that he'd set the fire. Yet people who knew Diaz, and had worked with him, could not believe it.

"I was like, Edgar did that? No way! No way. No way," says Ruth Cruz, who worked at Three Happy Cows.

"No. No. It was his baby. Couldn't imagine," says Don Seale, who supplied milk to the factory.

This summer, NPR is getting crafty in the kitchen. As part of Weekend Edition's Do Try This At Home series, chefs are sharing their cleverest hacks and tips — taking expensive, exhausting or intimidating recipes and tweaking them to work in any home kitchen.

This week: A stress-free way to make a classic — and unruly — French sauce that's a variation of hollandaise.

Zucchini blossoms at West Seattle Farmers Market
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds explores the West Seattle farmers market with food writer Cynthia Nims where the two discover fresh zucchini blossoms.

Most aspiring chefs long for the white hat, the gleaming kitchen, the fancy menu.

But Nigeria-born Tunde Wey stumbled into a different version of the (American) chef's dream. He wanted to see the country and share the food of his West African childhood with friends and strangers along the way.

So a few months ago, he packed up his knives and his spices at his home in Detroit and started crisscrossing the U.S. by Greyhound bus.

Chocolate might be headed toward a crisis, depending on whom you ask.

That's at least what the 2015 Cocoa Barometer has to say. It's an overview of sustainability issues in the cocoa sector, written by various European and U.S. NGOs, and was released in the U.S. this week. And what they're really worried about is the people who grow the beans that are ground up to make our beloved treat.

The U.S. government's system for regulating the products of biotechnology, including GMOs, or genetically modified organisms, was born in 1986, and it has been controversial from the start. Now, it will be getting a makeover — in part to assure the public that GMOs really are adequately regulated.

crab Puget Sound
Flickr Photo/Dana (CC BY ND 2.0)

David Hyde talks Puget Sound crabbing with Landgon Cook on the first day of the season.  

Rainbow chard is the star of this stir fry.
Courtesy of Hsiao-Ching Chou

Ross Reynolds finds out what’s fresh at the South Lake Union branch of the Pike Place Market with Hsiao-Ching Chou, cooking coach and former food editor at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. 

Matthew Bell 

Texas native Robert West used to lament that many of his Muslim friends, even those who had spent most or all of their lives in the Lone Star state, had never even tried real Texas-style smoked BBQ.

“It’s an atrocity,” West recalls saying. “You cannot live in Texas your entire lives and not have BBQ. Somebody’s got to do something.”

West grumbled about this often enough that his friend, Jason Bones eventually told him, “Let’s actually do it. Or just shut up about it.”

Washington Cherry Growers Grapple With Drought, Labor Issues

Jun 24, 2015
Stemilt Growers, a cherry packing facility in Wenatchee, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Jay Inslee (CC BY ND 2.0)

Kim Malcolm speaks with Northwest News Network's Anna King about Washington's cherry industry. Water restrictions and labor shortages have thrown up some hurdles for local producers, but this year's crop is still expected to produce about 15 million boxes of cherries.

Summer time is berry time at the farmers market.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds and Seattle Times food writer Rebekah Denn visit the Phinney Ridge farmers market and discover a bounty of berries.

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Nobody really likes to be graded. Especially when you don't get an A.

Some organic farmers are protesting a new grading system for produce and flowers that's coming into force at Whole Foods. They say it devalues the organic label and could become an "existential threat."

Jeannie Yandel talks with Pike Brewing Company vice president Drew Gillespie about the company's new, 100 percent local terroir beer.

In the last couple of years, we've detected a faint buzz about crispy crickets and crunchy mealworms. Companies pedaling scorpion lollipops and peanut butter-and-jelly protein bars made with cricket flour have thrust their wares into our hands and mailboxes.