food

How To Find A Food Desert Near You

Mar 13, 2013

Want to know where you can't buy fresh, healthful food? The USDA has the map for you.

The feds' new Food Access Research Atlas lets you find out just where it's difficult to buy broccoli or bananas in counties across the U.S. Forget walking to the store in St. Louis, Minn., where most people live more than a mile from a grocery store. Ditto for Hyde, N.C., and Pushmataha, Okla.

Should GMO Foods Be Labeled?

Mar 5, 2013
GMO food label
AP Photo/Paul Sakuma

Later this year, Washington state voters may get the chance to weigh in on whether genetically modified foods should be labeled as such. Supporters of proposed Initiative 522 say consumers are owed the information about what's in their food. I-522's opponents say there are no known risks to GMOs, so why label them? We look at the science of genetically modified organisms and how I-522 would affect consumers with professor Toby Bradshaw of the University of Washington and Dr. Michael Hansen of Consumers Union.

Robert Lustig wants to convince the world that sugar is making us very sick. And lately he's turned to an unconventional field – econometrics – to do it.

Lustig rounded up statisticians and epidemiologists to look at the relationship between food and diabetes risk. The paper, published this week in the journal PLoS One, found that the more sugar on the market in 175 countries, the higher the country's diabetes rate.

Flickr/Oceiana

Seattle and Portland are among the best cities to dine on seafood if you want the salmon, sole or halibut you order to actually be salmon, sole or halibut. The two Northwest cities emerged from a national report Thursday with some of the lowest rates of “fish fraud” in the country.

According to the research project by the marine conservation group, Oceana, 33 percent of the 1,215 samples of fish it had analyzed were not actually the fish that they were labeled as by the sushi bars, restaurants and retail outlets selling them.

Michelle Rhee: A "Radical" On Education Reform

Feb 19, 2013
Michelle Rhee
Flickr photo/The National Academy Of Sciences

Michelle Rhee says our education system is failing. The founder and CEO of StudentsFirst and former chancellor of Washington, DC, public schools says she would rigorously evaluate teachers, end tenure and boost pay for high-performing teachers while firing the least effective. Her critics say her reliance on test scores and support for school vouchers would destroy the public education system. Michelle Rhee joins us for a conversation about students, standardized tests, teachers unions, charter schools and her new book, "Radical: Fighting to Put Students First."

Two customers' collapses last year didn't seem to faze fans of Las Vegas' Heart Attack Grill.

Is Living "All Natural" Worth It?

Feb 6, 2013
Organic good
Flickr photo/Sarah Gilbert

Organic and “all natural” products are on the rise.  Grocery stores have expanded their free-range, non-toxic options. We’re paying more trying to make healthier choices for our bodies and our world. More women are choosing “natural childbirth” and tossing old plastic Tupperware to avoid toxic leaching.  Are all these efforts really working?  Is there a right way and a wrong way to live “naturally?” Journalist Nathanael Johnson has answers.

"Fresh Off The Boat" With Eddie Huang

Feb 5, 2013
Fresh Off The Boat
Courtesy/Spiegel & Grau

Eddie Huang stormed through childhood. He fought bigoted kids, defied stereotypes of the "model minority" and partied hard. But he clung to the delights of  his father’s restaurant and the flavors of his mother’s kitchen. Following a stint as a lawyer and a stand-up comic, he returned to his raucous roots, dipped in the flavors of Taiwan, America and the world. Eddie Huang joins us for a conversation about the first-generation immigrant experience he writes about in his new memoir, “Fresh Off the Boat.”

Flickr photo/Doran

“Under Washington law, is a consumer entitled to emotional distress damages when a fast-food employee spits in his or her hamburger even though the consumer did not eat the hamburger?” The Washington Supreme Court said Thursday that the answer may be yes.

sheffpixie / Flickr

Today in the US there’s not much of a market for horse meat. But believe it or not, there used to be over 20 US processing plants that sold American horse meat to Asian and European markets.


Last Friday The Conversation got a call from a listener demanding that President Obama reintroduce a ban on horse slaughter. So we got a little curious. Today Ross talks to Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes about the history of horse slaughter in the US.

OLYMPIA, Wash. - When you order that special filet at a restaurant or store, you're often going on trust that the fish actually is what the menu or label says it is. In Washington, two state agencies are asking for tougher penalties to deter seafood fraud.

Investigators for Consumer Reports recently found more than one-fifth of the fish they submitted for DNA identification was mislabeled at the point of sale.

Washington Fish and Wildlife police deputy chief Mike Cenci says the penalties for false labeling need to be stronger.

Presidency Maldives / Flickr

This year we could be voting on an initiative requiring labeling of all food that contains genetically modified food, what critics call Frankenfood. Backers have turned in what they say are the necessary signatures to get it on the ballot.

Environmental activist Mark Lynas was an adamant opponent of genetically modified foods. He wrote in 2008, "The technology moves entirely in the wrong direction intensifying human technological manipulation of nature when we should be aiming at a more holistic ecological approach instead."

Mark Lynas was one of the first people to break into fields that scientists had planted with genetically modified test crops — and then rip them out of the ground. Ross Reynolds talks with Mark Lynas about what changed his mind about GMOs.

  This year Washington voters could be voting on whether foods that have been produced using genetic engineering would have to be labeled as such. Trudy Bialic is the director of public affairs for PCC Natural Markets and a member of the campaign steering committee for Label-It-WA, the campaign that supports Initiative 522. Ross Reynolds talks with her about why she supports the labeling initiative.

Ask King County Executive Dow Constantine

Dec 20, 2012
Dow Constantine
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Earlier this month King County Executive Dow Constantine signed some of the state's first same-sex marriage licenses and spoke against a plan to run more coal trains through Seattle. We'll ask him about these and other stories impacting our region. Have a question for the King County executive? Call 206.543.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

Why do most people love animals they consider cute, like puppies or panda bears, but they don’t have a lot of love for animals they consider ugly, like naked mole rats? Western Carolina University Psychology professor Hal Herzog explores the paradoxical relationship people have with animals in a new book, "Some we love, some we hate, some we eat: Why it’s so hard to think straight about animals."

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