food

Flickr photo/Jason Walsh (CC BY 2.0)

    

David Hyde talks to seafood economics expert Gunnar Knapp about why Copper River salmon is so expensive.  

Flickr Photo/Seattle.roamer (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Mycologist Paul Stamets calls fungi “the soil magicians of nature.” He says they were the first organisms to come to land 1.3 billion years ago.

Stamets has spent his career searching for ways to learn from nature’s secrets to heal humans and the planet. One focus of his research is Northwest mycelium. 

New Seattle Co-op Is All About Beer

May 14, 2015
Flying Bike Cooperative hopes to open their doors late June.
Courtesy of Erinn Hale

Kim Malcolm talks with Kevin Forhan, head brewer of Seattle's first cooperative brewery, Flying Bike, about making beer with over 1,000 bosses. 

Thoa Nguyen competes on "Beat Bobby Flay."
Courtesy of the Food Network

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle chef Thoa Nguyen about her long and winding path path to successful Seattle restaurateur. Nguyen filmed a segment on Beat Bobby Flay for the Food Network which will be airing May 14.

Sheep ranchers, feedlot owners, and processors in states like Colorado, Nebraska and Illinois are banking on America becoming a more diverse place.

Specifically, they want American Muslims to buy more of their lamb.

Fishmonger Andrew Wichmann says cruise ship traffic is great for Seattle but doesn't do much for him directly. They can't bring food onboard. "We wouldn't survive without local clientele."
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

The cruise ship docked at 7 a.m.

By 8 a.m., Danielle Smith and her family were at Pike Place Market, walking through the stalls. They had 48 hours to enjoy the city before flying home to Atlanta.

Taking Mom Out For Brunch? It's A Feminist Tradition

May 9, 2015

More than a quarter of American adults will dine out this Mother's Day – and most of them will opt to fete Mom with a breakfast, lunch or brunch out. If this describes your plans, guess what? You're honoring a feminist tradition.

A drive across the Northwest quickly reveals things look really dry everywhere.

Washington environmental regulators have reversed their decision to allow pesticide spraying on oyster beds after a public outcry about the use of toxic chemicals.

The state Department of Ecology had previously issued a permit to apply a pesticide to areas of Grays Harbor and Willapa Bay where oyster producers want to kill a type of shrimp that burrows into shellfish beds. The shellfish producers say they need to kill the shrimp because it make the ground so soft that their oysters suffocate.

Spring planting season is coming early this year for a lot of home gardeners. And this year some Pacific Northwest nurseries are getting familiar with the flavors of the Caribbean.

Regardless of our cooking prowess, all of us have undoubtedly spent some time in the kitchen. We all need to eat, and our preferences are intensely personal. Yet food is often overlooked in the biographies of anyone who wasn't a chef or gastronomic icon.

Dr. Stephen Tilles, the principle investigator for the peanut patch study in Seattle, with David Baty and his son Spencer, who suffers from a peanut allergy.
KUOW Photo/Amina al-Sadi

David Baty can remember the first time his son Spencer, then three years old, ate peanuts. He took the peanuts his dad gave him, and then he asked his dad for an ice pack. Spencer put it on his tongue as his cheeks started to get red.

Coffee and tea both landed in the British isles in the 1600s. In fact, java even got a head start of about a decade. And yet, a century later, tea was well on its way to becoming a daily habit for millions of Britons — which it remains to this day.

So how did tea emerge as Britain's hot beverage of choice?

You know the beautiful, mass-produced tomatoes you can buy at the grocery store? You can drop one and it'll bounce back unharmed, but doesn't taste like much.

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