food

A recent outbreak of Salmonella in frozen tuna might have sushi lovers wondering if it's safe to eat that raw fish.

The outbreak in question began in California in March. All told, it sickened 65 people in 11 states. There were 35 cases in California, with another 18 in Arizona and New Mexico. The rest of the cases were scattered across the country, including four in Minnesota.

Courtesy of Coalo Valley Farms

Eating bugs might sound like something you’d do if you lost a bet. But a few companies have cropped up that are marketing insect powder as a nutritional supplement.

Requiring little food or water, bugs also have a low-carbon footprint, a fact that makes them very attractive here in drought-stricken California.

But could cricket-packed cookies and milkshakes be the next big food trend?

Tomatoes at Queen Anne Farmers Market.
Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds goes to the Queen Anne Farmers Market to talk with cook, author and chef Becky Selengut about what's fresh for your table. Hear a simple recipe for using delicious tomatoes. Selengut's books include Good Fish and Shroom: Mind-Bendingly Good Recipes for Cultivated and Wild Mushrooms.

There's a new candidate in the century-old quest for perfect, guiltless sweetness.

I encountered it at the annual meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, a combination of Super Bowl, Mecca, and Disneyland for the folks who put the processing in processed food.

One of the most prestigious names in health care is taking a stand on food.

This week, Cleveland Clinic announced it would sever ties with McDonald's. As of Sept. 18, the McDonald's branch located in the Cleveland Clinic cafeteria will turn off its fryers and close its doors for good. Its lease will not be renewed.

Fortunately for those of us who are suckers for novelty, every year fruits and vegetables seem to come in more bewitching colors, shapes and flavors. In recent years, we've been transfixed by Glass Gem Corn and the vibrant orange Turkish eggplant.

Wild Yeast Can Transform Wine - With Some Risk

Aug 16, 2015

Winemaking is about more than just grapes. They need something else to ferment into alcohol: a microscopic fungus, yeast. People have been fermenting grapes for thousands of years using wild yeasts that grow in the vineyard. Researchers at Washington State University want to know more about these species.

On a recent evening, KUOW reporter Ann Dornfeld froze a tray of wild blackberries. When she pulled out the tray, she saw that tiny worms had crawled out of each berry.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

You know those blackberries you just picked?

There are worms in them.

Tiny white worms, almost transparent, that will ultimately blossom into fruit flies -- unless you eat them first. Scientists know them as Drosophila suzukii.

In the coming months, a few shoppers will encounter a new and unfamiliar phrase when looking at packages of pork: "Produced without the use of ractopamine."

It's the brainchild of David Maren, founder of Tendergrass Farms, which sells pork products from pigs raised the "all-natural" way, on pasture.

Maren first heard about ractopamine years ago, when he was just getting into this business. Maren was talking with his cousin, who raises pigs the conventional way, in big hog houses.

Chef and mixologist Kathy Casey at the Ballard Farmers Market.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel meets chef and mixologist Kathy Casey at the Ballard Farmers Market to shop for fresh peaches and honey to make a sparkling summer beverage: a honey lavender peach fizz (recipe below!).

Grapes before wine at the 2009 Indian Creek Harvest Fest in Kuna, Idaho.
Flickr Photo/Laura Gilmore (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

David Hyde talks with Alder Yarrow, founder of the wine blog  Vinography, about Idaho's prospects as a wine state.

An 8-year-old boy catches a pink salmon in the San Juans off Orcas Island.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

David Hyde speaks with Seattle forager and writer Langdon Cook about why he's excited about the big pink salmon run of 2015 (and says you should be, too).  

A sign for the farmers market.
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds meets food writer Sara Dickerman and her daughter Adele at the Columbia City Farmers Market to find out what’s fresh: some fine juicy plums that Dickerman turns into a plum pizza.

Christopherlin/Creative Commons

Yes, we're a food-obsessed nation. But we still have a long way to go to understand exactly what it is we're eating.

Food writer Anastacia Marx de Salcedo is here to help with a fun and startling new book "Combat-Ready Kitchen: How the US Military Shapes the Way You Eat."

During a severe drought in 2011, JennaDee Detro noticed that many trees on the family cattle ranch in Cat Spring, Texas, withered, but a certain evergreen holly appeared vigorous. It's called a yaupon.

"The best we can tell is that they enjoy suffering," Detro says with a laugh. "So this kind of extreme weather in Texas — and the extreme soil conditions — are perfect for the yaupon."

Detro began researching yaupon — a tree abundant in its native range, from coastal North Carolina to East Texas — and discovered that the plant contains caffeine and has a remarkable history.

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