food

Dr. Stephen Tilles, the principle investigator for the peanut patch study in Seattle, with David Baty and his son Spencer, who suffers from a peanut allergy.
KUOW Photo/Amina al-Sadi

David Baty can remember the first time his son Spencer, then three years old, ate peanuts. He took the peanuts his dad gave him, and then he asked his dad for an ice pack. Spencer put it on his tongue as his cheeks started to get red.

Coffee and tea both landed in the British isles in the 1600s. In fact, java even got a head start of about a decade. And yet, a century later, tea was well on its way to becoming a daily habit for millions of Britons — which it remains to this day.

So how did tea emerge as Britain's hot beverage of choice?

You know the beautiful, mass-produced tomatoes you can buy at the grocery store? You can drop one and it'll bounce back unharmed, but doesn't taste like much.

2014 file photo: Workers in Indonesia load fish onto a cargo ship bound for Thailand. Seafood caught by slaves mixes in with other fish at a number of sites in Thailand.
AP Photo/Dita Alangkara

Marcie Sillman speaks with Tobias Aguirre, executive director of FishWise, about a recent AP report detailing slavery in Asian fisheries and what Pacific Northwest shoppers can do to avoid purchasing seafood that may have been caught by slaves.

Some of the seafood that winds up in American grocery stores, in restaurants, even in cat food may have been caught by Burmese slaves. That's the conclusion of a yearlong investigation by The Associated Press.

The AP discovered and interviewed dozens of men being held against their will on Benjina, a remote Indonesian island, which serves as the base for a trawler fleet that fishes in the area.

Remember that old movie trope, in which the mousy girl who never gets noticed takes off her eyeglasses and — voila! — suddenly, everyone can see she was beautiful all along?

Well, a similar sort of scenario is starting to play out in the world of produce in the U.S. (minus the sexist subtext).

More than 1,000 guests in gowns and tuxedos crowded into a two-story hall on Saturday night at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Standing among a pack of well-preserved African elephants, they sampled the delicacies offered by waiters wending their way through the throngs. They had come for the annual dinner of the Explorers Club — and the cocktail-hour fare certainly required an adventurous palate: All of it was made of insects.

Larenda Myres holds an iced coffee drink with a "Race Together" sticker on it at a Starbucks store in Seattle, Wednesday, March 18, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Why did the Starbucks race initiative bother us THAT much? Should you be able to smoke in a Seattle park? And should you fight wage discrimination by talking openly about how much money you make? (How much DO you make?)

Bill Radke analyzes this week’s top stories with former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels, Northwest News Network’s Phyllis Fletcher and The Stranger's Eli Sanders.

The story of how kale went from frumpy to trendy is a great inspiration to Gabriela Bradt, a fisheries specialist at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.

"Nobody cared about kale. Then it became the green du jour," says Bradt.

The region's recent stretch of warm weather means Northwest sweet cherries will likely be going early to market this year.

Walk into a row of greenhouses in rural Britain, and a late English-winter day transforms to a swampy, humid tropical afternoon. You could be in Latin America or sub-Saharan Africa, which is exactly how cocoa plants like it.

"It's all right this time of year. It gets a bit hot later on in the summer," says greenhouse technician Heather Lake as she fiddles with a tray of seedlings — a platter of delicate, spindly, baby cocoa plants.

For many years, if a public school district wanted to serve students apples or milk from local farmers, it could face all kinds of hurdles. Schools were locked into strict contracts with distributors, few of whom saw any reason to start bringing in local products. Those contracts also often precluded schools from working directly with local farmers.

Customers line up at Starbucks, all the way outside.
Flickr Photo/oinonio (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Starbucks is set to expand mobile ordering to its Pacific Northwest stores. KUOW's Kim Malcolm talks with retail analyst Brian Sozzi of Belus Capital Advisors about why the not-just-coffee company wants to move you out of the line and onto your phone.

Flickr Photo/Debbie R

Ross Reynolds talks with Kristi Heim, executive director of Washington State's China Relations Council, about local exports to China and the growing demand for fresh fruit and baby products. 

Pages