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A Conversation With Author Maria Semple

Apr 3, 2013

Our spring membership drive continues with a visit from author Maria Semple. Her novel “Where’d You Go, Bernadette” — about a reclusive L.A. transplant and her family trying to navigate the cultural nuances of their new home of Seattle — is out in paperback and headed to the big screen. She joins us to talk about writing, movie making and the latest Seattle news.

 Show your support by becoming a member with your call to 206.543.9595.

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Mar 20, 2013
Vaughn Palmer
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada, film critic Robert Horton looks at what's happening at the movies, and Geekwire's Todd Bishop reviews the latest in tech.

Nick Offerman Both Is And Isn't Ron Swanson

Mar 14, 2013
AP Photo/Carlo Allegri/Invision

Nick Offerman plays Ron Swanson, the libertarian government official on the TV show Parks and Recreation. Ross Reynolds talks to actor Nick Offerman about libertarianism, Hempfest, acting and cupcakes — kind of.

Flickr Photo/Ryan Sitzman

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. And it turns out Canada doesn’t want a coal port either. Then, film critic Robert Horton asks the question: What does it mean when something is “directed” in a movie? Also, Seattle Times economy columnist Jon Talton explores how the sequester cuts will affect our local economy.   

Canadian flag
Flickr Photo/Arlo Bates

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton has a look at what's happening at the movies. Then, Michele Matassa Flores wraps up the region's recent economic news.

The Seattle Times
Flickr Photo/Mr T In DC

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton considers Burt Lancaster, Frances Farmer, Vivien Leigh and others in the movie business who would have turned 100 this year. Geekwire's Todd Bishop reviews what's happening in tech, including a dust-up between Microsoft and online advertisers over a new browser privacy setting, rumors of an "iWatch" coming from Apple, and the new digital paywall at The Seattle Times.

Borge Ousland: Adventures In Polar Exploration

Feb 25, 2013
South Pole
Flickr Photo/Eli Duke

Global warming and melting ice are rapidly changing the landscape of the Earth's polar regions. What will it mean for life at the poles, and for the rest of the world? Norwegian explorer Borge Ousland has seen this environmental transformation for himself. He’s the first person to complete solo expeditions across both the North and South Poles. In 2010, he completed the Northern Passage – a circumnavigation of the entire Arctic ocean. He joins us to talk about his adventures in the vast, frozen tundra of the poles.

Jean-Luc Godard used to say that all you needed to make a noir film was “a man, a woman and a gun.” Many movies still use that basic premise, but how do the Film Noir movies hold up some 60 years later?

Ross Reynolds talks with the "Czar of Noir" Eddie Muller about the notoriously dark film genre, the role it plays in film today and the noir festival that kicks off in Seattle tonight.

How much is a best-picture Oscar worth? Not the statuette — winners are required to sell that back to the Academy for a buck if they want to get rid of it. No, what's the Oscar worth at the box office?

Oscar trophies
AP Photo/Alex Domanski/dapd


Vancouver Sun political columnist Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton makes some Oscar predictions and previews SIFF's upcoming Noir City series. Then, Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton reviews the latest news on the Dreamliner and gives his take on the federal budget sequester and immigration reform proposals.

Canadian flag
Flickr illustration/Mike Gabelmann

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton looks at presidents on the silver screen. Then, Michael Parks wraps up the region's recent economic news.

Esperanza Spalding
Photo by John Shearer/Invision/AP

More than 28 million people tuned in to watch the Grammy Awards — how much do the Grammy's actually have to do with music? Bush family photos are posted online after a hacker breaks into several private email accounts. What kind of a window is it into the former president’s life, and is it a window we should be caught looking through? Also, director Steven Soderbergh says he's retiring from filmmaking. What legacy does he leave behind and how does film fit into the storytelling medium today? Northwest Film Forum’s Lyall Bush, singer and songwriter Rachel Flotard and Three Imaginary Girls co-founder and editor Liz Riley join us to discuss the week's art and culture news.

John Shearer/Invision/AP

David Hyde talks with Frank Rich about the historical significance of Quentin Tarantino’s "Django Unchained" and why Rich thinks it deserves to win an Academy Award for best picture. Then he turns to historian Sean Wilentz who thinks it is not "Django Unchained" but Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" that is the historically accurate and significant film that deserves the Oscar.

Prime minister Stephen Harper
(AP Photo/ Manish Swarup)

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper tweets about his cat and pet chinchilla. Film critic Robert Horton discusses the renowned French comedian Pierre Etaix. The Northwest Film Forum is showing his five films this week as a tribute to his comedic impact on cinema. Then, Todd Bishop talks tech business news and latest on Microsoft’s new tablet.

Sylvester Stallone
Courtesy/Wikipedia


Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton appraises two new movies starring some of the biggest names of 1980s Hollywood: Stallone and Schwarzenegger. Then, Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton considers the economic fortunes of Tacoma and the South Sound and wraps up the latest news on the Boeing 787.

Canadian flag
Flickr illustration/Mike Gabelmann

Vancouver Sun political columnist Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada, film critic Robert Horton looks at how what we know about an artist's personal life affects how we appreciate their art, and Michael Parks assesses recent troubles for the Dreamliner and the range of outcomes for Boeing and Washington state.

HalinaV / Flickr

Some Olympia lawmakers are backing a bill to let movie theaters and live performance venues apply for liquor licenses to serve beer and wine. The bill is sponsored by Democrat Jim Moeller, who represents Vancouver. Ross Reynolds finds out the likelihood of moviegoers cracking a cold one at a theater near you.

Steve Ballmer and Paul Jacobs
AP Photo/Julie Jacobson

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada, film critic Robert Horton joins us with a look at the movies, and Geekwire's Todd Bishop talks Windows 8, Amazon's new mp3 offer and the region's top tech startups.

State Legislature Convenes In Olympia

Jan 14, 2013
Washington State Capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)


Today marks the start of the Washington State Legislature’s 2013 regular session. Lawmakers have their sights set on education as a top priority — they'll be looking at both funding and measuring student success. They’ll also be working with a new governor, Jay Inslee, and a new balance of power in the state Senate. Publicola's Josh Feit joins us with a preview.

Woody Allen
Flickr illustration/Felix Jackson, Jr.

Victoria Times-Colonist columnist Les Leyne brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton considers Woody Allen's classic comedies of the 1970s. Then, Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton reviews the aftermath of the "fiscal cliff" deal.

"Almost Live!" Alums Have Seattle's Number

Jan 4, 2013
The 206
Facebook/The 206 TV

Seattle has grown since KING 5's sketch comedy show Almost Live! left the air in 1999. Now some of the team that brought "The Lame List" and "COPS in Wallingford" to TV is back with a new show of modern-day Seattle-centric funny. The 206, starring Pat Cashman, John Keister and Chris Cashman, premieres tomorrow night. They join us in studio with a preview.

The Russian Mall Boom

Jan 3, 2013

Shopping malls have come to Russia. Investors as diverse as IKEA and Wall Street banks are funneling money into new Russian shopping centers. They are big, and very popular. Russian malls are anchored by grocery stores, where aisles full of fresh food dazzle older shoppers who still carry memories of shortages and food lines. We talk with The New York Times' Moscow correspondent Andrew Kramer about the malls of Russia.

Victoria Times-Colonist columnist Les Leyne brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton shares some of the movie offerings at Seattle's newly reopened Museum of History and Industry. Then, Michael Parks looks at Amazon's big 2012, Microsoft's make-or-break 2013 and what Boeing's backlog means for the region's employment.

Robert Horton's Best Movies Of 2012

Dec 26, 2012
Batman, Bilbo, Bond
courtesy Warner Bros. Entertainment, New Line Cinema, MGM

What was the best movie of 2012? The year saw the return of Batman, Bilbo and Bond, but box office blowout doesn't mean it's the best movie. Where would you rank "Moonrise Kingdom, "Lincoln" or "Beasts of the Southern Wild?" Let's look back on Celluloid 2012 with film critic Robert Horton.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Robert Horton reflects on the best holiday films. Then, we review the latest economic news with Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton.

VIDEO: Teen Challenges Samoan Stereotypes

Dec 18, 2012

Manu Tuito'elau, 18 years old, was running late to history class at Evergreen High School, just south of Seattle. It wasn't his first time.

Manu's teacher called him out for being late. Manu didn't want to put up with it, so he started to walk out of class. That's when he remembers hearing his teacher say that it was always Manu and his people that scored low in class. He also remembers his teacher asking, "How come you couldn't do as well in my classes as you do on the field?"

The Hobbit
courtesy Warner Bros. Entertainment

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton previews "The Hobbit." Then, we look at Northwest companies in the news with Michael Parks.

"The Big Screen"

Nov 8, 2012

Ross Reynolds talks with film historian critic and commentator David Thomson about why he decided to undertake nothing less than the story of the movies in his new book, “The Big Screen.”

Last year we spoke with author Jason Zinoman who wrote, "Shock Value: How a Few Eccentric Outsiders Gave Us Nightmares, Conquered Hollywood, and Invented Modern Horror," and took some calls. To celebrate Halloween we've decided to bring you some highlights from that interview and a little more.

Nosferatu
Wikipedia

Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer explores how Washington state's election results would effect British Columbia and Canada, Robert Horton talks scary movies, and Michael Parks reviews the latest economic numbers.

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