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Canadian flag
Flickr Photo/Alex Indigo (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4eDBug

Les Layne from the Victoria Time Colonist brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton joins us with a look at the movies. Then, Todd Bishop brings us the latest business and technology news.  

Piper Kerman was a 24-year-old Smith College graduate in 1993, when she flew to Belgium with a suitcase of money intended for a West African drug lord.

This misguided adventure started when she began a romantic relationship with a woman who was part of what Kerman describes as a "clique of impossibly stylish and cool lesbians in their mid-30s." That woman was involved in a drug-smuggling ring, and got Kerman involved, too, though Kerman left that life after several months.

Flickr Photo/Transportation Safety Board of Canada (CC-BY-NC-ND)

  


Les Layne from the Victoria Time Colonist explains what the people of Lac Megantic have learned about the catastrophic train crash that happened there on July 16. Film critic Robert Horton joins us with a look at the last films of great directors and actors. Then, Jon Talton brings us the latest business news including what the housing recovery means for consumers and the market.

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Jul 31, 2013
Flickr Photo/Kevin Dooley



Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada, Everett Herald film critic Robert Horton looks at how rain is used in film and Michael Parks measures the global economic outlook, prospects for job growth in Washington and the latest moves by Amazon and Microsoft.

Canada, Culture, And Commerce

Jul 24, 2013
From Wikipedia.


Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Then, film critic Robert Horton looks at some of Hollywood's most famous duos. Finally, Geekwire's Todd Bishop wraps up the news from the world of tech.

From Wikipedia

Canada, Culture and Commerce
Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton delves into the “good clean fun” to be found in beach movies. Then, Jon Talton brings us the latest business news.

Original movie poster for "The Birds."

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer tells us who is on the B-list to be the next US ambassador to Canada (hint: it is not our former governor Christine Gregoire).  Film critic Robert Horton picks the top 10 movies from 1963 in honor of their 50th anniversary.  Then, Michele Matassa-Flores of the Puget Sound Business Journal brings us the region’s latest economic news.  

99% Invisible: Movie Title Sequences

Jul 8, 2013
Paramount Pictures

Movie title sequences used to be boring: a mere list of movie stars and directors you had to sit through before the actual movie started.

Then, directors got smart. They started farming the work out to talented design teams. Today, we hear an episode of 99% Invisible on the unseen art of movie title sequences.

What's your favorite title sequence of all time? Listen to the staff of Seattle's Scarecrow Video describe their personal favorites:

and here's a video with a whole lot more of them to inspire you:

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, July 8:

How To Catch A Foul Ball, And Animated Film

Jul 3, 2013
Flickr Photo/Eric Molina

 

Canada, Culture And Commerce: Vaughn Palmer, Robert Horton, Todd Bishop
Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. "Despicable Me" opens in theaters June 3 ahead of the Independence Day holiday. Film critic Robert Horton talks about what makes a good animated film. Then, Todd Bishop reviews the latest tech news including an app that can help you catch a foul ball at a Mariner’s game.

The Evolution Of Pot Smoking On TV

Jul 1, 2013
From the Facebook page of the TV show "Weeds."

  Smoking marijuana may be legal here in Washington state, but it's still a federal crime. That certainly hasn’t stopped some of the people that we spend the most time with from lighting up: popular characters on television. Mad Men has even seen leading man Don Draper get stoned this season. What's the history of getting high on the small screen? Is casual pot use getting more common on TV? Robert Thompson is director of the Bleier Center for Television and Popular Culture at Syracuse University. He talked with David Hyde.

Poster for the movie "20 Feet from Stardom."

Canada, Culture And Commerce: Vaughn Palmer, Robert Horton, Jon Talton
A huge, destructive flood hit Alberta causing an estimated $5 billion in damage. Canadian correspondent Vaughn Palmer gives us the lay of the land. Film critic Robert Horton joins us to preview two documentaries about music: "20 Feet from Stardom" and "Secret Disco Revolution." Then in business news, Jon Talton examines excessive CEO pay.  

Flickr Photo/Montreal metropole culturelle

  Canada, Culture And Commerce
Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada, including the arrest of the mayor of Montreal. Everett Herald film critic Robert Horton reviews "Bling Ring" and "World War Z," opening this weekend. Are these movies signs of the impending fall of the empire? Then, Michele Matassa-Flores of the Puget Sound Business Journal brings us the region’s latest economic news.  

Flickr Photo/NewGameNetwork

Canada
Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada.

Culture 
There are certain expectations for movies that come out in the summer months. Film critic Robert Horton unpacks the summer blockbuster and the new movies coming out that might break the mold.

Commerce
Apple has a launched its own radio platform, challenging Pandora and Rhapsody. Todd Bishop of Geekwire explains the competitive tech market, including the release of PS4 and Xbox One.

Actor Kal Penn: From Kumar To Cultural Diplomat

Jun 6, 2013
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Kal Penn is best known for his stoner role as Kumar in the "Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle” films. But Penn is also a former member of President Obama’s administration, where he worked on youth, art, and Asian American outreach.      

Flickr Photo/Alan Light

This Week In Olympia
The state legislature begins week four of the special session today. Everett Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield joins us with a  look at what to expect.

An Interview With Actor Kyle MacLachlan
“Who Killed Laura Palmer?” You may remember that phrase from the 1990 TV show "Twin Peaks" – which was set and filmed here in the Northwest. The short-lived series was a cultural phenomenon during its two year run – due in part to eccentric FBI agent Dale Cooper, played memorably by Yakima-native Kyle MacLachlan. In the 1980s, MacLachlan began his career starring in the David Lynch films "Dune" and "Blue Velvet." His other credits include "The Doors," "Showgirls," "Sex and the City" and "Desperate Housewives." More recently, he’s portrayed the mayor of Portland, in the sketch comedy series "Portlandia."

"The Boys In The Boat" Author Daniel James Brown
In 1936, as the US was starting to recover from the Great Depression, a group of University of Washington students won the right to represent the country at the Berlin Olympic Games. The story of how the Husky varsity crew team beat the competition and took home a gold medal has become legend in rowing circles.  Writer Daniel James Brown looks behind the news event to the story of how this group of young men came together as a unified crew.

New Documentary About Those Terms And Conditions You Signed

May 31, 2013

Everyone who uses a computer these days likely agrees to many "terms and conditions" agreements every year. But what are you really signing? Ross Reynolds interviews director Cullen Hoback, who takes a closer look at questions of privacy and consumer rights in a new documentary.    

The sixth installment of the "Fast & Furious" movie franchise is out, and Seattle film writer David Chen (editor-at-large, slashfilm.com) says it’s more than just “gas 'em up and shoot 'em up.” Chen says “FF6” is progressive because its multi-racial characters mostly ignore the topic of race and go about their fast and furious lives.

We Steal Secrets: A New Documentary About Wikileaks

May 30, 2013

There is a new documentary out about Wikileaks, Julian Assange and the American soldier Bradley Manning. It's called We Steal Secrets. Ross Reynolds interviews filmmaker Alex Gibney.

Nathaniel Philbrick's book "Bunker Hill."

Senate Immigration Bill Moves Forward
University of Washington professor Matt Barreto joins us to discuss the immigration bill that is moving through the Senate. The amended bill cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee with a bipartisan 13-5 vote and now moves to the Senate floor for a vote.

Planning Meals Vs. Takeout
American families throw away a lot of food; about $2,275 worth every year according to a study by the Natural Resource Defense Council. Using shopping lists and planning a week’s worth of meals in advance can cut down on waste, but that requires a new way of thinking. Melissa Lanz joins us with ideas on how to shift our thinking and eating patterns. 

Author Nathaniel Philbrick On "Bunker Hill"
Nathaniel Philbrick’s award-winning books reveal forgotten moments and characters in American history. His latest effort “Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution”  looks at the tension-filled city of Boston in the months leading up to the American Revolution. Philbrick’s portrait of the city reveals deep divisions over the issue of independence from Britain. He recounts the little-known story of Dr. Joseph Warren, a young physician whose passion for independence fueled the Patriot cause and led to Warren’s much-lamented death in the Battle of Bunker Hill. KUOW’s Dave Beck speaks with Nathaniel Philbrick.

SIFF logo

The Seattle International Film Festival starts Thursday and will run through June 9 featuring over 400 films from more than 80 countries.

Seattle film critic David Chen can’t wait. Chen is the editor-at-large of Slash Film and co-hosts “The Tobolowsky Files,” a radio program featuring true stories of life, love, and Hollywood as told by actor Stephen Tobolowsky.

The End Of Traditional TV?

May 14, 2013
Flickr photo/Steve Liao

More than 5 million US households don’t use traditional cable or satellite options for watching television shows, reports consumer research organization The Nielsen Company. Instead, people stream online.

Low-cost providers like Netflix or HULU are replacing the once beloved boob-tube. Ross Reynolds talks with Monica Guzman, technology columnist for The Seattle Times and GeekWire about how Americans are watching TV.

Seattle Parks Plan
Seattle officials want to hear from you about the future of the city’s parks. They're holding meetings this month to get public input on a parks plan that will guide where the city directs its resources in the years to come. We hear more from City Councilmember Sally Bagshaw.

Art Of Our City
A new live music and film project explores the line between ambition and bad luck as it applied to the Donner Party. "We Are All Failing Them" is a new commission by Seattle’s Northwest Film Forum (teaser below). It’s a song cycle performed live to film. We talk with composer Robin Holcomb about the latest venture in her wide-ranging career.

Neal Thompson On Robert “Believe It Or Not!” Ripley
A 1936 newspaper poll declared Robert Ripley the most popular man in America. How did a young, awkward newspaper cartoonist become a worldwide adventurer synonymous with the strange and unusual? Official Ripley biographer  Neal Thompson joins us.

Canada, Culture And Commerce

May 8, 2013

News From Up North
Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest from Canada.

"The Great Gatsby"
The latest film adaption of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s "The Great Gatsby" opens Friday. Film critic Robert Horton reviews the “strangeness” of Baz Luhrmann’s filmmaking and whether or not the anachronistic elements of the film worked.

The Successes And Failures In Local Business
Boeing is sending some engineering work to South Carolina, Microsoft is rethinking design elements of Windows 8 for PCs, and State Farm will begin hiring up to 1,000 jobs in Tacoma. Michael Parks has the latest on business news.

Flickr photo/Ratha Grimes

 Paying Internet Sales Tax
The Senate voted on Monday on a bill that would end tax-free Internet shopping. Slate’s Matthew Yglesias joins us with a look at the Marketplace Fairness Act and who’s behind the push to collect taxes on your online purchases.

A Conversation With Early Television Actor Jan Merlin
Jan Merlin starred in early television shows like Tom Corbett, Space Cadet and The Rough Riders. He went on to be an Emmy-winning script writer.  He grew to love the escape that theater and film could provide after a profound World War II experience.

New Music Recommendation
Are you stuck in a music listening rut?  We are surrounded by new music and innovative artists. Music blogger Liz Riley Tollefson recommends Drai Zich by The Heligoats, Rotting On The Vine by The Purrs, Inside An Aquarium by BOAT and Buzz, Buzz, Buzz by Jonathan Richman & The Modern Lovers.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
It has been hot outside. Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches this week’s weather forecast.

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Apr 24, 2013
The Canadian flag.
Flickr Photo/Christopher Policarpio (CC BY 2.0)

Tolling Proposed At The Canadian Border
The United States is considering tolling Canadians crossing the border. Vaughn Palmer of Vancouver Sun says there are already “fulminations on both sides of the border.”  

Let’s Hit The Road
Road films are about movement and change. Two new road movies end up in a surprising place. Some classic road movies take the viewer back home again.
 
All Roads Lead To The Arena District
Maybe the road leads to an entertainment district. That’s what Chris Hansen wants for Sodo. The Seattle Times' Jon Talton walks us through the concept. 

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Apr 17, 2013
Canadian flag
Flickr Photo/Arlo Bates

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton reviews what's happening on the silver screen. Then, Michael Parks wraps up the region's recent economic news.

Is The KOMO Sale An 'Oh No!' Sale?

Apr 12, 2013

Seattle TV and Radio is about to experience some big changes. Yesterday the Sinclair Broadcast Group announced that it was buying Seattle-based Fisher Communications for about $373 million. Fisher owns 20 television stations including KOMO in Seattle, and four Fisher radio stations in Seattle, including KOMO. Other stations include KIMA and KEPR in Yakima and the Tri-Cities, KATU in Portland, KVAL in Eugene and KBOI in Boise. Ross Reynolds gets the skinny on Sinclair from Northwestern University professor Dan Kennedy.

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Apr 10, 2013
Vaughn Palmer
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada, Everett Herald film critic Robert Horton looks at what's happening at the movies, and Geekwire's Todd Bishop reviews the latest in tech.

A Conversation With The Cast Of "The 206"

Apr 4, 2013
The 206
Facebook/The 206 TV

We bring you more of our favorite Weekday guests this hour as our spring membership drive rolls on. Earlier this year we spoke with the team behind Seattle sketch comedy show, The 206. We listen back to our conversation with Almost Live! alums John Keister and Pat Cashman and 206-er Chris Cashman. The show premiered on KING 5 in January and returns from a brief hiatus later this month.

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Apr 3, 2013

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Everett Herald film critic Robert Horton contemplates "Room 237," a look at the theories about the hidden meaning of Stanley Kubrick's "The Shining." Plus, Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton considers a Puget Sound economy without Boeing and the lessons of the canceled Lake Union Fourth of July fireworks.

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