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Couch Fest seeks to bring strangers together for a unique movie watching experience.
Flickr Photo/Mike Harber (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Couch Fest founder Craig Downing about why he thought a film festival where strangers get together in different houses to watch short films could help alleviate the "Seattle freeze."

The most closed country on earth — North Korea — is now denying its involvement in one of the biggest corporate hacks in history.

Someone attacked Sony Pictures Entertainment last week and made public troves of stolen data, including five unreleased films, medical records and salaries of nearly 7,000 global employees. But before a recent denial — another North Korean diplomat played coy about the country's involvement.

Inside the Harvard Exit movie theater, which will be closing in January 2015.
Flickr Photo/Andi Szilagyi

Marcie Sillman talks to Lyall Bush, executive director of the Northwest Film Forum, about the cultural legacy of the Harvard Exit Theater and what it's closing means for this area.

"Natalie" sits in the kitchen of her parents house. She was 16 when she ran away from home and fell in love with a guy who turned out to be a pimp.
Courtesy Tim Matsui/ Alexia Foundation

The Long Night,” a documentary about child sex trafficking in the Seattle area, is being released online Monday. Sara Lerner speaks with filmmaker Tim Matsui, who says he believes exploiting minors in this way is a symptom of underlying causes.

The theater revised its number of seats down from 798 to 570. The seats are leather and offer enough leg room for an average size adult woman to fully extend her legs (claim tested).
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

The Cinerama, a property managed by Paul Allen's Vulcan Real Estate, has reopened after an extensive, top-of-the-line renovation. Marcie Sillman speaks with Jennifer Bean, director of the cinema and media studies program at the University of Washington, about the history of Seattle's Cinerama, and the ways that movie theaters lure moviegoers into their seats.

As you may be aware, there's a hot new space movie now in theaters — Interstellar. Here's the premise: It's just a little bit in the future, conditions have become pretty horrible on Earth and some astronauts head out in search of a new planet for humans to inhabit.

YouTube

Ross Reynolds speaks with author and filmmaker Sebastian Junger about his latest project, “Last Patrol,” an HBO documentary about two soldiers and two war journalists hiking along 300 miles of  railroad tracks from Washington, D.C. to Pennsylvania.

Junger is an American journalist and author of the best-selling book "The Perfect Storm." In recent years he has chronicled stories of men at war in award-winning documentary films including "Restrepo."

HBO is planning a new six-hour miniseries on the Lewis and Clark expedition.

What's Your Favorite Color, Sweetheart? 'The Blood'

Oct 30, 2014
Chloe, 4, and her dad Matt Woerner loved watching horror films together.
Courtesy Woerner family

It's Halloween, and you probably have your own family tradition. Carving a jack-o-lantern, dressing up, eating too much candy.

For Seattleite Matt Woerner, it’s watching horror films with his 4-year-old daughter, Chloe.

Eight years after his death, James Brown is suddenly everywhere.

1023_E-TEAMWhen wars take place around the world, Human Rights Watch is keeping an eye on them.

Photo Megan Griffiths (Courtesy Lynn Shelton)

Lynn Shelton is best known for her small, intimate movies made on location in her hometown of Seattle.

These indie films are part of a genre known as mumblecore; movies made on small budgets with small crews. Shelton has writing credits on her first five features, but much of the dialogue is improvised.

Egyptian
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Seattle cinephiles were shocked and saddened when the venerable Egyptian Theater shut its doors in 2013.

Built as a Masonic Temple in 1915, the historic building on Pine and Broadway was transformed into a movie house in 1980.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This next item will be especially painful for Gen X-ers and even some Millennials. Saturday morning cartoons are officially a thing of the past.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "LOONEY TUNES")

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Georgia Durante's life has taken some unexpected turns. She was a model for Kodak — a "Kodak Girl" — who went on to do TV and commercial work as a stunt driver. In the '90s, she appeared in Chevrolet ads and was the stunt double for Cindy Crawford in a Pepsi commercial.

Film director John Sayles is in town with his partner in life and film, Maggie Renzi, ahead of the Port Townsend Film Festival. The two spoke with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman about their unique journey in filmmaking.

Sayles traces his interest in filmmaking back to his childhood. His family would head to a drive-in theater for hours of entertainment.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman interviews Seattle filmmaker Lynn Shelton about her sixth feature film, "Laggies," which opens SIFF's Women in Cinema Festival. The movie will have a wide theatrical release in October.

Jeannie Yandel talks with documentarian Ken Burns about what makes a good story. His new series, "The Roosevelts," airs September 14 on PBS.

Gillian Flynn's novel, "Gone Girl."

Welcome to the scary summer reading edition of Speakers Forum. This week you’ll be encouraged by our guest Gillian Flynn to read her best-selling novel, "Gone Girl," before the movie comes out in October.

You’ll hear her read the duly infamous “cool girl” passage, and learn the gritty details of her unusual writing technique. And as an added bonus, you’ll get Seattle writer Maria Semple’s take on the Flynn phenomenon.

How Seattle's Scarecrow Video Is Like A Kung Fu Movie

Aug 20, 2014
Joshua McNichols / KUOW

Video stores are dead, they say.

Then how – and WHY – did the Seattle video store Scarecrow Video just raise $100,000 in a Kickstarter campaign?

Flickr Photo/Java Colleen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to professor Robert Thompson, director of the Bleier Center for Television and Popular Culture at Syracuse University, about the rise and fall of video stores and what their value is in the community.

How A Seattle Orangutan Inspired Hollywood

Aug 11, 2014
Courtesy of Woodland Park Zoo, Karin Konoval

Ross Reynolds talks with actress Karin Konoval about her portrayal of "Maurice," the orangutan in the last two installments of the "Planet of the Apes" franchise. She was inspired by her work with Towan, an orangutan at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle. His keeper, Laura McComesky, also speaks about how the zoo is helping conservation efforts to protect endangered orangutans.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Issaquah-based filmmaker Taylor Guterson about his new film, "Burkholder," which opens at SIFF on Friday. 

Guterson doesn't use a script. He suggested situations and let the actors improvise lending a documentary feel to many scenes.

Flickr Photo/C.P.Storm (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with psychologist Joel Gold, who co-authored the book "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness." The book deals in part with the "Truman Show" delusion: a belief that everyone around you is an actor, and you're the star of a TV show. 

Ever since Netflix debuted the show “Orange is the New Black,” Larry Smith has had to contend with being known as the “real Larry.” Larry is the husband of Piper Kerman, whose memoir “Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison” is the basis of the series, which features characters named Piper Chapman and Larry Bloom.

Aereo, the company that lets subscribers watch TV stations' video that it routes onto the Internet, violates U.S. copyright law, the Supreme Court has ruled. The court's 6-3 decision reverses a lower court ruling on what has been a hotly contested issue.

What To Binge Watch This Summer

Jun 24, 2014
Flickr Photo/C.P.Storm (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets summer television recommendations from IMDB TV editor, Melanie McFarland.

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Flickr Photo/Roberta Schonborg

Steve Scher talks to the filmmaker Travis Rummell, dam engineer Jim Waddell and Jim Ahern, a Lewiston, Idaho, native,  about the new documentary "DamNation." The film discusses the change in attitudes towards dam and river health.

Brian Lamb's book "Sundays at Eight"

David Hyde talks to Brian Lamb about his new book "Sundays At Eight: 25 Years Of Stories From C-Span" and the future of the television network.

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