film

An Orca performs at a SeaWorld location in 2008.
Flickr Photo/Jeff Kraus (CC-BY-NC-ND)

John Hargrove was an orca trainer for 14 years, mainly at SeaWorld. Shortly after quitting the company he gained attention for his part in the documentary "Blackfish." The film chronicles conditions at SeaWorld theme parks and the death of Dawn Brancheau, a SeaWorld trainer killed by an orca in 2010.

Patton Oswalt
Flickr Photo/Jason Carlin (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Patton Oswalt is an American writer, actor and comedian. You may have read one of his books, seen him on film or television, heard him as the voice of Remy in the movie "Ratatouille" or become one of his millions of followers on Twitter. The L.A. Times called him “the dean of nerd comics.”

On this episode of Speakers Forum, Oswalt reads from his new book "Silver Screen Fiend: Learning About Life from an Addiction to Film." He calls it “the dorkiest addiction memoir ever.” 

Seattle Arts and Lectures presented this event featuring Oswalt at Town Hall Seattle on Jan. 31. He was joined on stage by George Meyer, a producer and writer for The Simpsons. Thanks to Jennie Cecil Moore for this recording. 

A cast of characters from Washington’s TV and film industry descended on Olympia Tuesday seeking an expanded tax credit for the film industry.

A still from the trailer for "Kill Team."
YouTube

Marcie Sillman talks with filmmaker Dan Krauss about his new documentary, "The Kill Team." The film features the story of Private Adam Winfield, who attempted to warn the military of war crimes against innocent civilians in Afghanistan. He later plead guilty to involvement in a killing and was sentenced for three years in prison.

Cheryl Stumbo at TEDx Seattle in 2013.
Flickr Photo/TEDx Seattle (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman interviews Cheryl Stumbo, the subject of a short documentary film called "The Accidental Activist" premiering at Seattle's Jewish Film Festival. Stumbo became an activist for gun control after being wounded in the 2006 shooting at the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle. 

film movie
Flickr Photo/StudioTempura (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Washington Filmworks executive director Amy Lillard about a legislative proposal that would increase the amount of tax incentives for film productions in Washington state.

Hike, outdoor, A trail marker designating the Pacific Crest Trail.
Flickr Photo/Dan Hurt (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Jack Haskel, Pacific Crest Trail Association's Trail Information Specialist, about the impact that the book and recent movie, "Wild," is having on the PCT.

When the Oscars are handed out on Sunday, the red carpet, the ceremony, the films and people who are honored, will be all about being seen. But there's a group of actors who will never be seen on screen. They're only heard — and barely.

Loopers are voice actors whose work begins after the show or film is shot and edited. Their job is to record what people in the background of a scene could be saying. Their dialogue is never really heard at full volume — and it's mostly ad-libbed.

File photo of Seattle skyline.
Flickr Photo/clappstar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with The Stranger's David Schmader about the movie version of the bestselling book, "Fifty Shades of Grey." Both the book and the movie are set in downtown Seattle.

The Sundance Film Festival wrapped up last weekend. For more than two decades, the festival and the Sundance Institute have been a springboard for independent filmmakers. This year, two of its darlings — Boyhood and Whiplash — are nominated for an Academy Award in the best picture category.

A Sniper's Look At 'American Sniper'

Jan 23, 2015

The Oscar-nominated film “American Sniper” has been an unexpected hit at the box office; it’s already grossed over $100 million so far. The film, which tells the story of Navy SEAL sniper Chris Kyle, is also finding fans within the sniper community.

Former Marine Scout Sniper Chris Mark tells Here & Now’s Robin Young that the film helps to counter the perception “that, you know, we’re lonely men that hide in the shadows and kill for a living.”

Matt Smith in "My Last Year With The Nuns"
John Jeffcoat

Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood is hipster central these days: the place to go for the latest in music clubs, trendy restaurants and street style.

That wasn't always the case.

Lawyer Derek Karpel thought The Interview would be a horrible movie after reading some of the reviews, but told reporter Julie Walker that his opinion was a bit different after he saw the film on Thursday at Cinema Village in New York City.

"It's not a great movie — this is not Kubrick, this is a stupid Seth Rogen/James Franco movie," he said. "With that said, they were still very funny. I thought it was well done."

Web developer Nick Doiron, who was at the same screening, said he thought that the film lived up to the hype, and that the audience seemed to agree.

It is, perhaps, the worst nightmare for those of us constantly trying to get a white-dominated Hollywood to widen its doors of opportunity for people of color: All those executives who say the right things in public and give to the right causes, just might think something much less admirable about diversity behind closed doors.

When an Abu Dhabi film company, Image Nation, asked filmmaker Tom Roberts last summer to come up with an idea for a documentary about polio, he was flummoxed.

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