film

Egyptian
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Seattle cinephiles were shocked and saddened when the venerable Egyptian Theater shut its doors in 2013.

Built as a Masonic Temple in 1915, the historic building on Pine and Broadway was transformed into a movie house in 1980.

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Georgia Durante's life has taken some unexpected turns. She was a model for Kodak — a "Kodak Girl" — who went on to do TV and commercial work as a stunt driver. In the '90s, she appeared in Chevrolet ads and was the stunt double for Cindy Crawford in a Pepsi commercial.

Film director John Sayles is in town with his partner in life and film, Maggie Renzi, ahead of the Port Townsend Film Festival. The two spoke with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman about their unique journey in filmmaking.

Sayles traces his interest in filmmaking back to his childhood. His family would head to a drive-in theater for hours of entertainment.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman interviews Seattle filmmaker Lynn Shelton about her sixth feature film, "Laggies," which opens SIFF's Women in Cinema Festival. The movie will have a wide theatrical release in October.

Jeannie Yandel talks with documentarian Ken Burns about what makes a good story. His new series, "The Roosevelts," airs September 14 on PBS.

Gillian Flynn's novel, "Gone Girl."

Welcome to the scary summer reading edition of Speakers Forum. This week you’ll be encouraged by our guest Gillian Flynn to read her best-selling novel, "Gone Girl," before the movie comes out in October.

You’ll hear her read the duly infamous “cool girl” passage, and learn the gritty details of her unusual writing technique. And as an added bonus, you’ll get Seattle writer Maria Semple’s take on the Flynn phenomenon.

Flickr Photo/Java Colleen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to professor Robert Thompson, director of the Bleier Center for Television and Popular Culture at Syracuse University, about the rise and fall of video stores and what their value is in the community.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Issaquah-based filmmaker Taylor Guterson about his new film, "Burkholder," which opens at SIFF on Friday. 

Guterson doesn't use a script. He suggested situations and let the actors improvise lending a documentary feel to many scenes.

PBS/Ken Burns

Ross Reynolds talks with filmmaker Ken Burns about his new documentary, "The Address."

The film captures the story of a school for boys with learning differences and disabilities in Vermont where the students are encouraged to recite President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.

Steve McQueen's film "12 Years a Slave" is nominated for nine Academy Awards.

The 86th annual Academy Awards is this Sunday, and one of the films expected to take home the Oscar is Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave.”

Photo by Tonya Wise/Invision/AP

Ross Reynolds talks with Almost Live alum Bob Nelson about the film, "Nebraska."

Nelson, who now lives on Whidbey Island, is nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. "Nebraska" is up for six Oscars this Sunday.

Shirley Temple, who charmed the nation as a child movie star in the 1930s and went on to become one of the nation's diplomats in posts that included ambassador to Czechoslovakia during the Cold War, has died.

She was 85.

The Associated Press writes that publicist Cheryl Kagan says the actress, known as Shirley Temple Black in her private life, died late Monday evening at her home near San Francisco. Kagan tells the AP that Temple's family and caregivers were with her.

Flickr Photo/Elen Nivrae

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle filmmaker Lynn Shelton about the shake up at City of Seattle's Office of Film and Music.

Keith Curry wanted to be a career soldier, but injuries he sustained while deployed to Iraq ended that future.

“So,” Curry asked himself, “how can I continue to contribute?”

Let's Go To The Movies!

Aug 28, 2013
Flickr Photo/m4tik

This hour on The Conversation, we leave radio for the big screen to talk to some of our favorite filmmakers. Grab some overpriced popcorn and candy and listen to interviews with the late Nora Ephron, director Guillermo del Toro, director Paul Verhoeven and film historian David Thompson.

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