film

When Finding Nemo came out in 2003, it was Dory, the plucky, forgetful blue fish, who taught us all, in the face of adversity, to "just keep swimming."

Ellen DeGeneres, who voiced Dory, says she was "flattered and honored and awed" to have her legacy tied to such a determined and positive little fish.

Dory came along during a particularly tough time for DeGeneres — "I hadn't worked for three years," she tells NPR's Kelly McEvers.

Can comedy reform a swing hater?

Jun 14, 2016
Negin Farsad performs at TEDWomen2015, May 29, 2015.
Flickr Photo/TED Conference (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/sRrmMx

Bill Radke speaks with social justice comedian Negin Farsad about how she believes comedy can change people's negative views of Muslims and other minorities. Her new book is "How To Make White People Laugh." 

The Oculus Rift virtual reality headset pictured in 2013.
Flickr Photo/Sergey Galyonkin (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/gwcD7s

Ross Reynolds interviews Sandy Cioffi, curator of the virtual reality festival SIFFX, within the Seattle International Film Festival. Cioffi describes the unique ability of VR productions to evoke empathy and emotion and explains how people who don't attend the festival can experience VR for themselves.

Screenshot from the trailer for 'Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell.'
YouTube

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle filmmaker Megan Griffiths about her picks for the Seattle International Film Festival. Griffiths recommends "Captain Fantastic" and "Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell."

Griffiths directed "The Night Stalker, which is also playing at SIFF.

Week in Review panel Paul Guppy, Bill Radke, Zaki Hamid and Joni Balter
KUOW Photo,Isolde Raftery

Was KUOW too private about its negotiations to buy a public radio station? What say should the public have in bathroom privacy? Should the private Seattle University accommodate its students differently from a public university? What does Woody Allen’s private life have to do with Seattle’s viewing public?

film movie
Flickr Photo/StudioTempura (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/64xwT6

Bill Radke talks with Seattle Times columnist Nicole Brodeur and The Stranger's Sean Nelson about Seattle International Film Festival's choice to open this year's festival with the new Woody Allen film.

Will Vancouver continue to be a stand-in for Seattle in film and television.
Flickr Photo/Alex Costin (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rTJE31

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the decision in British Columbia to reduce film and TV tax breaks. 

The new movie Krisha is a family drama about addiction and chaos. In it, a recovering addict named Krisha comes home for Thanksgiving after being away from her family for years.

If the family in the film seems tighter than most acting ensembles, it's because they have history: The director and writer, Trey Edward Shults, cast his aunt as the main character, his mother as the family matriarch and himself in the role of Krisha's estranged son.

The list of iconic movies filmed at least partly in Oregon is long. It includes “The Goonies,” “Animal House,” and more recently, “Wild” starring Reese Witherspoon.

Church abuse victim Mary Dispenza looks on in her studio with her artwork in the background in her Bellevue, Wash., home on Saturday, Dec. 2, 2006.
AP Photo/Kevin P. Casey

Bill Radke talks with Mary Dispenza, director of SNAP (Survivors Network for those Abused by Priests) in Seattle, about her reaction to "Spotlight" winning Best Picture at the Oscars Sunday night. The movie tells the story of how Boston Globe reporters uncovered a massive child abuse cover-up by the Catholic Church.

An animated film is up for best documentary short at the Oscars this year. It's only the second time an animated film has been in the running since the category was established in the 1940s. Last Day of Freedom is the story of Bill Babbitt, a man who turns his brother in for murder, hoping the police will help his brother get the care he needs for PTSD.

The Babbitts' story is told through more than 30,000 drawings, most of them in black and white. They were created by Dee Hibbert-Jones and Nomi Talisman, two Northern California-based artists.

Vancouver, B.C,
Flickr Photo/Cliff Hellis (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dxchD5

Bill Radke talks with CBC Radio pop culture columnist Kim Linekin about how The X-Files helped turn Vancouver, B.C. into a thriving hub for TV and film productions.

This week, the latest installment in the Star Wars film saga is posting record numbers around the world. In 1981, NPR hoped the interstellar fable would do the same for its audience numbers. That's right: Some of you may have forgotten (and some might not even know) that the network created three radio dramas based on George Lucas' original three movies.

Characters on television who consider or obtain abortions don't reflect the demographics of American women who choose them or their reasons for doing so, according to a recent analysis from researchers at the University of California, San Francisco.

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