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[It should be obvious, but there are loads of spoilers below from the first four episodes of Twin Peaks: The Return.]

In a year that has brought us some pretty trippy TV so far, Showtime's Twin Peaks revival has managed to uncork the weirdest, wildest, most unfathomable four hours of television I have seen this year on a major media outlet.

And for David Lynch fans, that's probably going to sound like heaven.

Bill Radke speaks with Wes Hurley, co-director of the award-winning autobiographical documentary short Little Potato. Hurley explains the hardships of growing up gay in Russia and the mysterious Channel 3 which began broadcasting American films, giving his family hope as they struggled to make it to America. He also discusses the culture shock of moving from Vladivostok to Seattle in the late 90s. 

How does a person end up in Nickelsville?

Feb 28, 2017
Courtesy of Derek McNeill

Bill Radke speaks with filmmaker Derek McNeill about his new documentary "The Road to Nickelsville." Radke also speaks with Colin McCredie, a man who lived in the Nickelsville homeless camp. There will be a screening of the film Sunday, March 5, at the Northwest Film Forum at 7 p.m

Courtesy of James Allen Smith

Bill Radke speaks with filmmaker James Allen Smith about his latest project to meet Trump supporters. Smith recently drove his Prius from Seattle to Lynden to talk with people who voted for Trump. He is posting those conversation on his YouTube channel

It's one of the oldest clichés of horror movies: the black guy dies first. But that's not the case in the new film "Get Out," written and directed by Jordan Peele (best known for the Comedy Central series "Key And Peele"). Gene and guest host Eric Deggans chat with Peele about his new film, check in with African-American filmmaker Ernest Dickerson, who's directed many scary movies and TV shows, and dive deep into race in horror-movie history with Robin Means Coleman, who's been analyzing and writing about the genre for over a decade.

KUOW PHOTO/BILL RADKE

Bill Radke speaks with author Frank Abe about his 2000 documentary "Conscience and the Constitution," which looks at Japanese who resisted their internment in American camps during World War II. Abe explains why this resistance was so controversial at the time, why it means so much now and what modern resistance looks like. 

A scene from the movie Captain Fantastic, which was set in Washington state.
Bleecker Street

You may have seen the movie Captain Fantastic.

This week, actor Viggo Mortensen got an Academy Award nomination for his work in it.


Some people possess a quality — a highly specific fuel mixture of intelligence and humor — that makes them seem like they've always got a secret they want to share with you, and only you.

It's not obvious. That's the whole point of it: It lives on the sly, this quality, around the edges of what they say and do. It sidles up to you and draws you in, it whispers to you that you are important and special, and that's why this person chose you. You share something, the two of you.

Carrie Fisher, the actress who became a pop culture icon for her performance as Princess Leia in Star Wars, has died at age 60.

Fisher had suffered a massive heart attack last week on a flight from London to Los Angeles. On Sunday, her family said she was in stable condition.

A representative of Fisher's daughter, Bille Lourd, confirmed that Fisher died on Tuesday morning.

Fisher shot to fame at the age of 19, when she took on her instantly iconic role in Star Wars.

The Seattle International Film Festival's director and chief curator, Carl Spence, is stepping down after more than 20 years with SIFF.

Spence joined the organization in 1994 as an assistant to the festival founders.

Seattle resident Amanda Knox on the roof of the KUOW parking garage in Seattle's University District.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

When Amanda Knox enters a coffee shop in Seattle, she just wants a cup of coffee.

Sometimes that’s what happens.

It's well-known that Dear Leader was crazy about movies. What's less known — at least in the West — is that infamous North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il was so crazy about them that he kidnapped a South Korean actress and a movie director in 1978 and forced them to work for him for years. That story is the subject of a new documentary called The Lovers and the Despot.

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn, host of CBC Radio's On The Coast, about a complaint filed on behalf of Vancouver animation workers. Animators claim they worked in terrible conditions and weren't paid for overtime during the creation of the Seth Rogan film, "Sausage Party."

Bad Moms is a movie about good moms who try to go bad. Kristen Bell, Mila Kunis and Kathryn Hahn play suburban Chicago mothers who find themselves ground down by the daily cycle of school drop-offs and pick-ups, soccer games, supermarket runs, errands, chores and endless worries. One night they wind up at the same bar after a PTA meeting and together they decide to let loose.

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