environment

In the past few years, students at hundreds of colleges and universities have started pushing their schools to divest from fossil fuel companies as a way to slow climate change.

The campaign has had some notable wins in the past year. But at tiny Swarthmore College, outside of Philadelphia, where the movement was born, students have been staging a sit-in for nearly a month to try to make their voices heard.

Test pencil
Flickr Photo/mammal (CC-BY-NC-ND)

If you don’t like standardized tests, how should we assess our kids’ learning? Do we really want to ban all cell phone use in the car, or do we just say we do? And can a flotilla of kayaks block a giant oil derrick-pulling cargo carrier?

Bill Radke debates this week’s news with KIRO 7’s Essex Porter, Crosscut’s Knute Berger and Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter.

California is four years into a historic drought, and water for human use is vying with the water needs of wildlife, such as threatened salmon.

In parts of northern California, an explosive and unregulated increase in marijuana cultivation is contributing to the problem. Now, a study says the impact of pot grows on fish-bearing streams is threatening their survival.

Researchers monitoring water levels in streams in Humboldt and Mendocino Counties last summer say the water impacts of cannabis grow operations are dramatic.

Activists Urge Wyden To Stop 'Fast Track' Bill

Apr 9, 2015

Labor and environmental advocates are urging Sen. Ron Wyden to oppose a bill that would "fast track" the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade deal.

Activists rallied outside Wyden’s Portland office Wednesday afternoon. They were calling for the senator to step away from a "fast track" bill that could limit lawmakers’ ability to amend later trade agreements.

The TPP trade deal has been a target for labor and environmental groups. In part, because many of the details have been kept confidential from the public.

Mt. Hood Snowpack At Record Low Ahead Of Final Measurement Thursday

Apr 9, 2015

This is the time of year when mountain snowpacks are usually at their deepest. But as of last week, three quarters of Oregon’s long-term snow monitoring sites had the lowest snowpack levels on record. On Mt. Hood, the final snow survey of the season will be conducted Thursday.

Julie Koeberle is a Snow Hydrologist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service. She sat down with OPB’s Kate Davidson to talk about the year’s snowpack and what lies ahead.

A snowpack that is less than 20 percent of the normal amount has farmers and ranchers in southern Oregon worried, but the region’s rafting guides say in spite of the limited snowfall they expect to have plenty of water to float on this summer.

Pete Wallstrom, a guide and owner of Momentum River Expeditions, says he’s getting lots of calls from clients wondering if they should cancel their trips on Oregon’s iconic Rogue River due to drought.

Columbia River Gorge.
Flickr Photo/Nietnagel (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Brett VandenHeuvel, the executive director at Columbia Riverkeeper, about why the re-negotiation of a treaty between Canada and the United States is important for the Columbia River. 

The Northwest’s most iconic bird could get a conservation boost in the coming years.

On Wednesday the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing it will review the protection status of the Northern Spotted Owl. The result could be an endangered species listing.

The Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission did not reject a controversial propane export terminal as opponents urged it to do on Tuesday.

Instead, the board voted 6-4 to recommend a zone change and a carbon fee. The recommendation goes to the Portland City Council for final approval.

Oregon lawmakers are turning their attention to earthquake and tsunami preparedness.

Across the Northwest, farmers are already making tough calls because of this year’s drought. The dismal snowpack is to blame.

The Swinomish Tribe has filed a lawsuit against BNSF Railway to stop oil trains from traveling through its reservation.

BNSF train tracks cross the top of the Swinomish Reservation in Skagit County. In recent years they’ve been used to move oil from North Dakota to two refineries in Anacortes.

Managers Likely To Cancel West Coast Sardine Fishery

Apr 7, 2015

The Pacific Fishery Management Council has yet to make the final call, but initial reports indicate there aren't enough fish to open a sardine fishery on the West Coast this year.

That's bad news for several fishing towns in Oregon and Washington, where the majority of the West Coast sardines were landed in the past several years, and where some processors focus primarily on sardines.

The latest population estimates show sardines have fallen below the 150,000 metric ton cutoff for opening a West Coast fishery.

A member of the Teanaway wolf pack in western Washington state. The wolf was in recovery from tranquilizing drug when this photo was taken.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Washington state’s wolf population grew by 30 percent last year – a big success for the state's wolf recovery plan.

But rancher Len McIrvin of Diamond M Ranch doesn't see why state conservationists are patting themselves on the back. And he finds it baffling that people are so fond of wolves. To him, they’re bloodthirsty predators.

If you’re at the Seattle Mariners season opener Monday you might run into some folks with clipboards, gathering signatures for a newly-announced initiative for 2016 that would tax carbon emissions.

The circulation of petitions to put Initiative 732 on the 2016 ballot signals a new strategy that may come into play if Gov. Jay Inslee and fellow Democrats in the Legislature are unable to pass their own carbon cap-and-trade proposal.

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