environment | KUOW News and Information

environment

Opponents of a possible water bottling plant in the Columbia Gorge are weighing their options now that a judge has approved a water rights transfer that's key to the plant's existence.

When it comes to the amount of trash produced, Oregon is moving in the wrong direction. A new report Monday from the Department of Environmental Quality shows households are producing more solid waste, but recycling and composting less of it.

Seven environmental groups want to prove coal being hauled by rail is polluting Washington’s waterways. If they are successful, the outcome could have huge implications for the way trains are regulated going forward.

The case is scheduled to go to trial in Seattle Monday.

Smoke stacks during a night scene in Tacoma, Wash.
Flickr Photo/Tom Collins (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with New York Times Seattle bureau chief Kirk Johnson about the potential impact of a carbon tax on the American coal industry. Initiative 732 would impose a tax on carbon emissions, cut taxes on manufacturing and sales, and reduce Washington's sales tax by one point.

There’s a huge building with a massive pool of water at the Hanford nuclear site in southeast Washington state. The water glows an eerie neon blue from an effect known as the Cherenkov Glow. The light comes from the decay of the nearly 2,000 highly-radioactive cesium and strontium capsules held in the pool.

KUOW Photo / John Ryan

In a year that has broken record after high-temperature record, politicians in Washington state are saying a vote for them is a vote for the climate. Two initiatives on the ballot claim to be major advances in fighting climate change. KUOW fact-checks the initiative claims.


It’s the deep-bellied growl that stops them.

The researchers are just approaching the grizzly bear when he begins expressing his displeasure. Grizzly No. 1225 had been smart enough to avoid a huge, metal box trap. But not the leg snare next to it.

Northwest oil train opponents are celebrating after a county in the Columbia River Gorge rejected a track-expansion request from Union Pacific Railroad.

Forest lands near Skykomish, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

More than $1.2 million has been spent on one of more obscure statewide races in Washington.

That's the battle for public lands commissioner. Democrat Hilary Franz and Republican Steven McLaughlin have each raised over $400,000, and two environmental groups have spent another $400,000 on independent expenditures in the race.

This is the third story in a three-part series. Read part one and part two.

In 2011, a bill creating a new tax on birdseed to fund wildlife conservation had widespread support, including the governor’s. It failed.

Police used pepper spray and what they called nonlethal ammunition to remove Dakota Access Pipeline protesters from federal land Wednesday. Demonstrators say they were trying to occupy land just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation where construction of the controversial pipeline is scheduled.

More than a quarter of the lands in Washington state and more than half of Oregon’s acreage are owned by the U.S. government. It’s land that makes up national parks, forests, monuments, and wildlife refuges.

So what would it mean if the federal government did what many have been asking for, and transferred those lands to states?

This is the first story in a three-part series. Read part one and part two.

For wildlife in Oregon, the best way to stay alive is to make sure someone wants to kill you.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

If you go to Puget Sound Energy’s website, you’ll see Washington’s largest utility claim to take a stand on greenhouse gas emissions. The gas and electric utility says says it's investing in wind power and supporting policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

At PSE's Bellevue headquarters on Monday, you’d have seen environmentalists protesting PSE's efforts to block action on climate change.


Several hundred supporters of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe staged a protest at the Army Corps of Engineers building in downtown Portland.

A plan to build an oil pipeline across land and rivers important to the Standing Rock Sioux has sparked one of the largest, most diverse tribal protest movements in decades. Last week, more than 100 protesters were arrested at their encampment in North Dakota.

In Portland on Monday, hundreds of protesters gathered in solidarity, carrying signs that declared "Water is Life" and "No Dakota Access Pipeline."

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