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elections

When Donald Trump enters the Oval Office, his presidency will begin with a national security challenge that has no precedent — four separate wars where the U.S. military is bombing Islamist extremists.

Presidential transitions in wartime aren't new, and some earlier conflicts were on a much larger scale. President Obama confronted two major wars on his first day in 2009. President Nixon came into office as the Vietnam War raged. President Truman assumed office when Franklin D. Roosevelt died in the final months of World War II.

Donald Trump will take office at a pivotal time for the world's neediest.

The world's wealthy countries have, since 2000, been part of a historic partnership with poor countries to eliminate poverty and roll back diseases.

President-elect Donald Trump's first week after pulling off an upset victory has had plenty of missteps. The rocky start to his transition planning that one source described to CNN as a "knife fight" has done little to assure his critics and skeptical Republicans that he'll have a smooth ascension to the Oval Office surrounded by qualified advisers. Trump denies that the transition is rocky.

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Flickr Photo/Bruno Casonato (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/c1MdB

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the first phone call between Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and President-elect Donald Trump. 

Former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn about what a Donald Trump presidency will mean for Seattle and what challenges the city could face in the next four years. 

Courtesy of The Discovery Channel

Ranae Holland, a host of Animal Planet’s "Finding Bigfoot," had a sense Hillary Clinton wouldn’t win the election.

A lot has changed since election night when it looked like House Democrats were poised to gain two seats and cement their majority. Now fortunes could be changing in favor of Republicans and the Washington state House could be headed for a tie.

According to numbers released Monday by the Oregon Secretary of State's office, about 42 percent of people who were automatically registered to vote this year did so in this month's election.

King County Executive Dow Constantine celebrates the Sound Transit Board's approval of a ST3 package for the fall ballot.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

King County Executive Dow Constantine says he will defy President-elect Donald Trump on immigration policy, even if it means federal funding cuts.

Washington state elector Bret Chiafalo
Courtesy of Bret Chiafalo

Thousands of Americans have protested the Trump presidency. But the election isn't completely over.

Boeing’s Shared Services Group (SSG) is set to move to the southwest state by 2020.
Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/7C1E9w

Bill Radke speaks with Emily Parkhurst, editor in chief of the Puget Sound Business Journal, about what a Donald Trump administration means for local businesses. 

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Bill Radke speaks with Jim Walsh, chairman of the Grays Harbor County Republican party, about why Grays Harbor county voted for Donald Trump this election. Grays Harbor was one of four western Washington counties that flipped from blue to red this election. It was the first time the county had voted Republican in 90 years. 

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Flickr Photo/Franco Bouly (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6rk2Qf

Bill Radke talks to Todd Bishop of Geekwire about the effect Facebook has on what sort of content users see. 

Students hold up signs during a walkout to protest the election of Donald Trump as president, Monday, Nov. 14, 2016, in Seattle. A spokesman with Seattle Public Schools estimates that about 2,300 students from 14 middle and high schools participated.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Bill Radke speaks with Quinn Angelou-Lysaker about how she helped organize students from eight Seattle high schools to walk out in protest of Donald Trump's election to the presidency.

Angelou-Lysaker discusses how she helped organize students on social media, how she's relating to Trump supporters at school and why some students are planning to send President-elect Trump a pile of bricks.

If you followed the presidential polls at all closely, chances are that you expected Hillary Clinton to win last week. So did all of the major prediction models that use polls to game out election outcome probabilities.

So perhaps everyone should have expected that in a year when all political norms were broken, the polls that the political world fixates upon would also prove to be flawed.

This year, the National Book Awards ceremony comes at a time when the nation has rarely seemed more divided. The bitter presidential campaign exposed a fault line in the United States that will not easily be repaired. And while there's no one simple answer, Lisa Lucas, head of the National Book Foundation, recommends one way to understand the other side: read.

"My life is small" she says, "and I think books are a way to make your life larger."

With the defeat of Hillary Clinton and the election of Donald Trump, Democrats may feel they have hit bottom.

The new power structure in Washington will combine a Republican president and a Republican Congress for the first time since 2006. Throw in pending and prospective vacancies on the Supreme Court, and you can see why many progressives consider this the worst-case scenario.

But it is not.

Students at high schools across Seattle walked out of class Monday  to protest the election of Donald Trump. Many of them then marched to Cal Anderson Park on Capitol Hill.

Millennials might have been Hillary Clinton's Achilles' heel on Tuesday night.

Obama won 60 percent of the millennial vote. Clinton got only about 55 percent. (We're using "millennials" as shorthand for voters between the ages of 18 and 29, but some millennials are in their 30s).

But it's not that young voters across the country were necessarily flocking to the Republican Party this year.

In Bernie Sanders' new book, Our Revolution, the Vermont senator tells the story of his life, his career and his run for the Democratic presidential nomination.

He also spells out the programs he believes the country should adopt to combat such ills as inequality, discrimination and lack of opportunity, not to mention the burdens of college and health care costs.

Sanders says he was not shocked by Donald Trump's victory. But he says the election results show it is time for the Democratic Party to undergo a fundamental reassessment.

Hannah Atlas hugs her mom, Judith Gille, as the crowd sings the late Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" during a vigil Sunday at Seattle's Cal Anderson Park.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

People letting out raw emotion and looking for community. A new generation of Americans getting a crash course in politics.

Hundreds gathered Sunday evening at Seattle's Cal Anderson Park on Capitol Hill to voice support for American democracy and opposition to President-elect Donald Trump.

Donald Trump has proposed a very detailed tax plan — but his statements on the campaign trail don't always match what his proposal would really do.

For instance, at a rally in Scranton, Pa., Trump promised to "massively cut taxes for the middle class, the forgotten people, the forgotten men and women of this country, who built our country." During a town hall meeting on NBC's Today show, he said he believes in raising taxes on the wealthy.

Courtesy of Barbara Frailey

The results of the presidential election have stunned people across the country. Trump's win has had a particularly emotional effect on some women and  girls. 

Seattle Girls' School is an all girl middle school in the Central District. And the first day after the presidential election was a time for sharing. Many teachers canceled their regular lesson plans and allowed their students to express their feelings about Trump's victory.

Art teacher Janet Miller said many girls were upset.

Episode 735: President Trump

Nov 12, 2016

Last month, Donald Trump released his plans for his first 100 days in office. He talked about dismantling NAFTA and repealing the Affordable Care Act. He called for deporting millions of undocumented immigrants and building a wall along the southern border. He promised to slash taxes and ban White House officials from lobbying for five years.

Now that Donald Trump is President-elect, what can he actually do? What's possible and what would it would actually take? We look at the laws on breaking trade agreements and how much concrete he'd need to construct a wall along the border.

The rise of Trumpism

Nov 12, 2016

The rise of Trumpism, for lack of a better term, now appears to be overdetermined. The financial crisis of 2008 put an exclamation point on 40 or so years of declining wages and growing economic inequality, for which immigrants from Mexico and Latin America were an easy scapegoat.  

Brian Wahlberg gives daughter Luciena a good view of the proceedings as the crowd sings at Cal Anderson Park in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

In the liberal bastion that is Seattle, the response to the election was acute. People cried openly on buses and in cafes. Some took time off work to mourn in bed. It wasn't that their candidate had lost, we heard again and again, it was that they feared for the future.

Donald Trump compared to Andrew Jackson

Nov 11, 2016
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The White House

A lot of people have been saying the triumph of a man like Donald Trump is unprecedented in American history. But then you have to remember Andrew Jackson.

Even former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, a close Trump confidante and advisor, compared Trump favorably with Jackson.

Flickr/Washington State House Republicans

If you look at a map of the presidential vote in Washington, you'll see solid Democratic blue in the Puget Sound region. The large population centers in Western Washington carried the state overwhelmingly for Hillary Clinton. But east of the Cascades, every county except for one, voted for Donald Trump. Matt Manweller, Republican state lawmaker from Ellensburg, is also a political science professor at Central Washington University. He spoke with KUOW’s Emily Fox about Trump’s appeal east of the Cascade Mountains.

Thousands of protesters moved through the streets of downtown Portland on Thursday night to speak out on a wide range of issues, including the election of Donald Trump.

People turned out in droves, gathering first at Pioneer Courthouse Square. Thursday was the third night people have protested in the city since Trump won the general election. Police estimated the crowd at around 4,000 people during its peak.

Amy Radil

A statewide initiative to help pay for political campaigns with public money has failed in Washington. That’s despite supporters raising $4 million to pass it.  

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