elections | KUOW News and Information

elections

They may not change history. But four Washington electors made history Monday when they broke ranks and voted for alternative candidates for president and vice president. This hasn’t happened in Washington in 40 years.

Meanwhile, all seven of Oregon’s Electoral College votes went to Hillary Clinton. Clinton easily won each state’s popular vote last month.

The Electoral College will cast ballots Monday at noon. The first elector to proclaim himself ‘faithless’ is from Washington state. Since then, others have joined him.

'Week in Review' panel Dan Savage, Chris Vance, Bill Radke and Joni Balter.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Washington state's presidential electors meet to pick a president at noon on Monday, and in an effort to derail President-elect Donald Trump, two of them say they won't be casting their votes for Hillary Clinton even though that's who state voters chose.

Also, some of Seattle's big names in tech are meeting with Trump, including Amazon's Jeff Bezos, who once joked about sending the president-elect to space on a rocket.

And Governor Jay Inslee wants a carbon tax to help fund education, a three-term Seattle City Councilmember said he won't run for reelection, and how badly do you need to check Facebook from Mount Rainier?

Hillary Clinton has kept a low profile since losing the election to Donald Trump, but at a private event before donors Thursday night, she blamed her loss, in part, on "some unprecedented factors" — namely Russian hacking and the letter about the investigation into her email server released by FBI Director James Comey days before the election.

Washington state presidential elector Levi Guerra from Grant County in rural Washington state.
Courtesy of Levi Guerra

“Not Trump.”

The Democrats caucusing in Moses Lake, in rural Washington state, could agree on that.


Washington state presidential elector Levi Guerra, center, joined by fellow elector P. Bret Chiafalo , right, announce that they're asking members of the Electoral College to pick a Republican "consensus candidate" rather than Donald Trump.
Steve Bloom/The Olympian via AP

Electoral college members in Washington state have been dealt a setback in their effort to keep the presidency away from Donald Trump.

After a hearing Wednesday in Seattle, U.S. District Judge James Robart said so-called faithless electors can still face fines for departing from their pledge to support the winner of the popular vote.

The first time a man hurt me, I was 8. My story isn't unusual

Dec 14, 2016
The author around the time that she was first assaulted. Tara Weaver
Courtesy of Tara Austen Weaver

Editor's note: Tara Weaver posted this essay on her personal Facebook page after the second presidential debate, when Donald Trump said that his talk of sexual assault was merely locker room banter. More than 4,400 people shared this story, and hundreds commented with their own devastating stories in the comments.

What do donors want from a President Trump?

Dec 13, 2016
Donald Trump
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke talks with Peter Gigante and Jim Jensen, two of Donald Trump's biggest donors in Washington state. Both men discuss what it feels like to be a Trump supporter in Washington, what appealed to them about the candidate and how they view the success of his transition so far. 

President-elect Donald Trump, in a statement early this morning, announced his intention to nominate ExxonMobil chairman and CEO Rex Tillerson to lead the State Department and become the country's top diplomat.

The selection, which had been rumored for the past week, is unusual in a number of ways, and could face more scrutiny than usual when the Senate holds confirmation hearings.

Here are some key facts about the president-elect's nominee for the final major position to be filled in his Cabinet:

At the CIA and the FBI, conversations about Russian hacks before the U.S. presidential election are moving into quiet spaces or stopping altogether, three sources told NPR.

The agencies are steeling themselves for a congressional investigation that could become one of the most sensitive and politicized in years.

Washington felt like a hall of mirrors on Monday.

The CIA has concluded that Russia interfered in the U.S. presidential election to help Donald Trump win. But Trump says he doesn't believe that. And the FBI doesn't think there's enough evidence.

The U.S. intelligence community had warned about the Russian meddling during the campaign. What's new is that the CIA says it is confident the Russians were acting with a specific goal in mind — to help Trump win.

On Sunday, President-elect Donald Trump told Fox News that he wouldn't feel "bound by a 'One China' policy unless we make a deal with China having to do with other things, including trade."

The One China policy has guided U.S.-China discourse since 1979, when Washington established diplomatic relations with Beijing and downgraded its embassy in Taiwan.

President Obama has ordered the intelligence community to conduct a "full review" of "malicious cyber activity" timed to U.S. elections, the White House said Friday.

The review will go all the way back to the 2008 campaign when China was found to have hacked both the Obama and McCain campaigns, White House spokesman Eric Schultz said at a Friday press briefing.

Braedon Wilkerson, Olga Farnam and Manis Pierre were all involved with the state GOP this year. Their views on Trump differ widely
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Deborah Wang speaks with Washington State Republican Party chair Susan Hutchison. She also speaks with Olga Farnam, Manis Pierre and Braedon Wilkerson. 

Senator Bernie Sanders at University Temple United Methodist Church
KUOW Photo/Sonya Harris

It may come as no surprise to you to hear that Bernie Sanders is not done. He was on the post-campaign trail last week, with a stop in Seattle to promote his new book, “Our Revolution: A Future To Believe In.”

Even after a bruising election season and outcome, Sanders says the majority of Americans agree with his vision of progress. He challenges us to “think big” about progressive change.

Pages