elections

KUOW Illustration

How well do you know the Seattle City Council district you live in? In 2013, Seattle voted to split the city into seven districts to elect council members with two more members elected at-large. This year will be the first election under that system.

To help navigate the new voting framework, we gathered demographic and other information on the new districts from Seattle's Department of Planning and Development and surveyed our listeners about their thoughts as they prepare to choose the new City Council.

This post has been updated to reflect Christie officially getting in the race for president.

Bill Radke and Joni Balter prep for a live broadcast of Week In Review at the Northgate Community Center on Friday, June 26, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The city plans to make its neighborhoods denser AND keep them lovable. How? And: Is it wrong to expose a Seattle police ticket trap? How can our state government come unstuck? 

Bill Radke debates the week's news with former mayor Mike McGinn, former state GOP chair Chris Vance and Seattle Channel's Joni Balter.

Annette Heide-Jessen's Kaffeeklatsch coffee shop has bet on Lake City Way. A big garage door opens right onto the state highway, which doubles as Lake City's 'main street.' Heide-Jessen sees Lake City as 'the next Columbia City.'
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

North Seattle used to be a place where you could just spread out. People came up north after the great fire of 1889 to escape the crowded tinderbox of downtown Seattle. Later, others came to build malls and for many other reasons.

Tyler Reedus (right) and Joshua Thomas at the Madison Pub in District 3
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

On a map of Seattle's new City Council District 3, one street stands out. That thoroughfare slashes diagonally through the street grid like a samurai sword: East Madison Street.

Decades ago, you could take a streetcar down Madison from downtown to Lake Washington. Today though, we’ll walk.

Terrell Jackson reopened his family's Catfish Corner restaurant in Rainier Beach, closer to old customers.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

If you want to track displacement from Seattle’s Central Area, just follow the restaurants. Jackson’s Catfish Corner in Rainier Beach started on East Cherry Street. That former restaurant, a neighborhood mainstay, was sold last year and is now boarded up.

A view of Mount Rainier from West Seattle, Seattle's new District 1.
Flickr Photo/Chas Redmond (CC by 2.0)

People in West Seattle often complain that no one comes to visit. They say this with some disbelief, because as far as they’re concerned, they live in the best part of the city – and possibly Earth. 

This post was updated at 12 p.m. ET

The 2016 presidential race has attracted the widest and most diverse field of major candidates in anyone's memory. Yet, even in this crowd, Donald John Trump Sr. stands apart. On Tuesday, he joined that field, two days after his 69th birthday.

Donald Trump, or "The Donald" as he often styles himself, has high national name recognition as a billionaire real estate developer and TV celebrity.

Jeb Bush is set to announce his candidacy for president Monday. If he wins, he would be the third Bush to be president in the past 25 years. Jeb Bush has said he's his own man. Well, here are five things you should know about him.

1. Jeb Bush is not his real name

'Week in Review' kicked off its summer tour in the lovely Youngstown Cultural Arts Center in West Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

How will Seattle's new City Council districts change the way neighborhood interests are represented at City Hall? What do you learn when your run for office comes up short (by just a few signatures)? What's keeping state lawmakers from packing up and going home? And will a new ban on smoking in parks make Seattle a happier or more stressed-out place?

Bill Radke debates these stories and more of the week's news with former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels, Seattle Channel host Joni Balter and Q13 political analyst C.R. Douglas.

This show was broadcast in front of a live audience from the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center in West Seattle as part of WIR's summer tour. 

Oregon could join a national movement to change the way the president is elected.

There is always a tension between the press and the candidates they cover. Journalists want access, and want to ask questions. Campaigns want to control the message. Over time, that has especially been true with Hillary Clinton.

The Hillary Clinton campaign went into overdrive Tuesday trying to minimize the damage from a new book that delves into Clinton foundation fundraising — and it's not using the typical channels to do so.

This post was updated at 10 a.m. ET

The field of major Republican presidential candidates is growing larger. Former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina jumped into the race Monday. And former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee is expected to jump into the race this week.

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