elections

'Week in Review' panel Gyasi Ross, Ron Sims, Jonathan Martin and KUOW's Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

How come America isn’t mocking Washington state as unrepresentative and irrelevant? Also, why do people of color favor Hillary Clinton? A pilotless car self-drives around Kirkland, is that our future? And what is the lesson of the shooting in the Jungle?

Bill Radke interprets this week’s news with former King County Executive Ron Sims, lawyer and activist Gyasi Ross, and Seattle Times editorial writer Jonathan Martin.

Before they got down to debating the big issues Thursday night, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders wrangled over one big word: progressivism.

Which of them was the true progressive? Was Clinton a progressive at all?

Sanders has long billed himself as a progressive, also describing himself as a "democratic socialist." He has not been known for flirting with the term "moderate." But Clinton has at times willingly chosen the latter label.

In a year where so many Republican voters are angry at Washington, it can be tough to have two former presidents in your family.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has struggled with that dynamic his entire campaign — sometimes embracing the Bush legacy, and sometimes holding it at arm's length. (The campaign logo is Jeb!, not Bush!)

Pramila Jayapal
Flickr Photo/Joe Mabel (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/zznt82

David Hyde speaks with Washington state Senator Pramila Jayapal about her bid to replace U.S. Congressman Jim McDermott. McDermott has represented the 7th Congressional District, including the Seattle area, since 1989.

Donald Trump.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke talks with Ralph Munro, Washington's former Secretary of State, about why he's distributing bumper stickers that say "Dump Trump." Munro is giving them away for free to anyone who wants one.

Iowa voters took the first step in choosing a new president of the United States Monday night. Republicans in the state chose Texas Sen. Ted Cruz over Donald Trump.

Hillary Clinton won the Iowa Democratic caucuses, according to data from the Iowa Democratic Party. The Associated Press called the race for Clinton shortly after 1 p.m. ET Tuesday. Based on the results of Monday's caucuses, the state party said Clinton received 699.57 state delegate equivalents; Sanders, 695.49.

Finally, after more than 10 months of campaigning from more than a dozen presidential candidates, voters get to weigh in. Iowa Republicans and Democrats will caucus Monday night, and the results could at long last provide some clarity to the Republican and Democratic nominating contests — or not.

Here are five things we're watching:

Since 1972, Iowa has held the first presidential nominating contests in the country. Over the years, the Iowa caucuses have grown in size, scope and importance, sometimes launching underdogs to the presidency or upsetting established political juggernauts.

As any bridge player can tell you, the game is different when there is no trump.

On Thursday night in Des Moines, Iowa, the seventh debate among major candidates for president in the Republican Party set a new standard in both substance and tone. And it did so because the front-runner in the 2016 nomination fight, Donald J. Trump, did not attend.

This week, NPR asked voters around the country how they are feeling about this election, and why so many tell us they are anxious or angry.

Get Caught Up:

  1. In the Trump-less debate, arrows were shot at Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who was center stage. He complained Fox News was trying to goad his rivals to attack him, taking on a Trump-ian line. The sharpest elbows were thrown between Cruz and Rubio over immigration after Fox News showed past clips of each of them espousing different views and having to defend whether or not they were opposed to legalization for immigrants in the country illegally.

Bill Radke speaks with King County Councilmember Joe McDermott about his bid to replace 14-term U.S. Congressman Jim McDermott (no relation).

This post was updated Wednesday at 8:45 a.m. ET

The stage is set for Thursday's Fox News Channel final debate ahead of the Iowa caucuses — but front-runner Donald Trump won't be there.

After teasing earlier Tuesday evening that he "probably won't bother" with the debate, Trump's campaign confirmed he won't participate, citing unfair treatment from the network:

 Jaxon Ravens, chairman of the Washington State Democratic Party
Flickr Photo/Ronald Woan (CC BY NC 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1JCLnwP

Bill Radke speaks with Jaxon Ravens, chairman of the Washington State Democratic Party, about voters' feelings on the economy as we head into the 2016 election year. He said that middle class incomes have struggled to keep pace, but as a whole the state has been doing very well. 

Bill Radke speaks with Susan Hutchison, chairman of the Washington State Republican Party, about voters' feelings on the economy as we head into the 2016 election year. She said there's a difference between those who live in downtown Seattle -- who have a sense that the engine is roaring due to Amazon -- and those who live in smaller cities or Eastern Washington. 

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