elections

This week we're making it up as we go

May 27, 2016
'Week in Review' panel Sydney Brownstone, C.R. Douglas, Rob McKenna and Ron Sims.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Seattle's Mayor is combating the city's homeless problem by "making it up as we go." That means, in part, shutting down the homeless encampment known as the Jungle. So where will those people go?

And how did Bernie Sanders go from winning the caucus to losing the primary? 

We'll tackle these subjects and more on Week in Review.

Listen to the live discussion Friday at noon, join in by following @KUOW and using #KUOWwir. Audio and podcast for this show will be available at 3 p.m.

Donald Trump marched through the Republican presidential primary field this year on the strength of a focused message: America used to be great. It isn't anymore. And that's mostly the fault of the Obama administration.

On Thursday, Trump applied that same thesis to American energy production. "America's incredible energy potential remains untapped," he told a North Dakota audience in what was billed as a major policy address. "It's totally self-inflicted. It's a wound, and it's a wound we have to heal."

If you've been following the Democratic presidential contest, you might be wondering how it is possible that Bernie Sanders seems to have all the energy and enthusiasm and, yet, Hillary Clinton is way ahead in the race to the nomination.

A listener named Gerard Allen wrote into the NPR Politics Podcast with an observation:

One of the most talked about politicians this election year is a woman who is not even on the ballot — Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. As her name is being thrown around as a possible VP pick for Hillary Clinton, there's an argument to be made that Warren doesn't even need the job. Plenty of her colleagues say she already exerts enormous influence from her perch in the Senate.

On Thursday, Donald Trump reached the magic number — 1,237. That's the number of delegates needed to clinch the Republican nomination, and he got there after 29 unbound Republican delegates decided to support him at the convention.

NPR's Don Gonyea spoke to some of those delegates to ask what made them decide to support Trump.

Ben Koppelman, Republican Convention Delegate From North Dakota

On switching support from Cruz to Trump

Sen. Reuven Carlyle was one of the plaintiffs in the case against I-1366, which was sponsored by Tim Eyman.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The latest tax-limiting initiative approved by Washington voters will not go into effect. Thursday, the Washington State Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional. Justices said the measure violated the requirement that initiatives be limited to a single subject.

But a poll shows voters still support the crux of the initiative.

Flickr Photo/Vox Efx (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with Princeton University political science professor Christopher Achen about his research into how Americans make up their minds when casting a ballot.

Jonathan Tong talks to Nicole Barthel about signing a petition to put Initiative 1464 on the November ballot. She signed.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

If you want to get an initiative on the ballot in Washington state you need a lot of signatures: nearly a quarter million valid ones from registered voters.

And typically, that's going to cost you around a million bucks. If you want to do it cheaper you need people like Jonathan Tong.

Donald Trump now has the support of 1,238 delegates — just a hair above the 1,237 threshold needed to clinch the Republican presidential nomination, according to The Associated Press.

During a recent speech before the National Rifle Association, Donald Trump was explicit about the voters he's reaching out to: "I will say, my poll numbers with men are through the roof, but I like women more than men. Come on, women. Let's go. Come on."

Amy Radil

The campaign to replace retiring Congressman Jim McDermott is getting off the ground in Seattle. Most of the candidates for the seat held their first debate Wednesday at the University of Washington.


Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, who is running for president in 2016.
Flickr Photo/Brookings Institution (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Washington state’s presidential primary shows why Hillary Clinton is beating Bernie Sanders nationally, says one political analyst.

The reason can be found in a tale of two western Washingtons, said Reid Wilson, chief political correspondent with Morning Consult, a Washington D.C.-based publication.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference, has inspired a conversation about vulgarity in political speech.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Emily Fox talks with reporter Reid Wilson about the national impact of Washington's presidential primary. Reid is chief political correspondent with Morning Consult, a Washington, D.C. based publication.

House Speaker Paul Ryan shot down reports Wednesday that he was on the verge of endorsing Donald Trump for president.

Madelyne Kassebaum says she's 100 years old and has voted in nearly every election she could. 'That's my duty,' she said as she dropped off her ballot outside the Ballard public library on Tuesday, May 24, 2016.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

Why vote in Washington state's presidential primary if the Democrats have already decided and there's only one Republican candidate left?

Madelyne Kassebaum has a simple answer. “That's my duty," she said as she dropped off her ballot in Ballard on Tuesday. "I am 100 years old."

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