elections

Boos from Bernie Sanders supporters drowned out U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge, the convention chair, when she mentioned Hillary Clinton on Monday.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

If you want to have the Hillary Clinton-Bernie Sanders divide explained in two sound bites, you could do worse than Jack Smith and Pamela Eakes.

State Rep. Noel Frame on giving Bernie supporters some space: "Frankly it's a little bit of a grieving process. And I think we need to understand and respect that."
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

It was an all-star cast as the Democratic National Convention kicked off last night in Philadelphia.

Al Franken. Sarah Silverman. Cory Booker. Michelle Obama. Bernie Sanders.

And Washington state’s delegation heard their messages for Sanders’ supporters: Unite, and vote for Hillary Clinton.


Thank you so much. You know, it's hard to believe that it has been eight years since I first came to this convention to talk with you about why I thought my husband should be President. Remember how I told you about his character and conviction, his decency and his grace — the traits that we've seen every day that he's served our country in the White House.

Even though Oregon voters legalized recreational marijuana in 2014, you can't legally buy the stuff in more than 100 Oregon communities. That's because some city and county governments have banned recreational marijuana businesses.

But voters in nearly half of those places will have the chance to overturn those bans this November.

Bet you didn't know people can bet on the outcome of the presidential election via the lottery. Not our lottery mind you, but the one in British Columbia.

Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens at a pre-convention event on July 24.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke talks with Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens about leaked DNC emails that many Bernie Sanders supporters say prove the party's primary contest was stacked against him.

A Bernie Sanders supporter demonstrates outside the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Monday, July 25.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

The Democratic National Convention kicked off Monday in Philadelphia with temperatures in the mid-90s (approximately 20 degrees higher than the point Seattleites start complaining about the heat).

The first night of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia was marked by acrimony despite constant calls for unity by party leaders.

Still reeling from the revelations of an email leak, supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders disrupted the proceedings throughout the night with boos and jeers. A night that was supposed to mark the beginning of a party coalescing behind its presidential nominee was instead punctuated by acts of division.

Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, traveled to Philadelphia to protest outside the Democratic National Convention.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's David Hyde about growing protests outside the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia. Radke also speaks with protester Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, Washington. 

Why would Russian President Vladimir Putin want to help Donald Trump win the White House?

That's the accusation from Democrats this week, after embarrassing internal Democratic National Committee emails appeared on Wikileaks on the eve of the party's convention in Philadelphia.

The emails were lifted earlier this year in a hacking breach that security experts have linked to Russian espionage groups.

Myra Gamburg, a Clinton alternate delegate, was on the Washington delegation's boat cruise in Philadelphia on Sunday. Gamburg, 84, said she's excited about what Clinton's nomination means for women.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

The heat in Philadelphia hits you like a brick wall whenever you leave the comfort of air conditioning — when you exit the airport, when you leave your hotel room, when you step out of a cab. It's thick, it's oppressive and it makes you sweat.

Personally, after the tepid summer we've had in Seattle, I found it delightful. But I get the feeling that I'm in the minority.

Don't count on Charles Adkins, a Sanders delegate from Everett, to get on the Clinton train just yet.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Washington state delegates are split into two camps in Philadelphia this week at the Democratic National Convention.

Nearly three quarters of our state’s delegates are Bernie Sanders supporters. The rest back Hillary Clinton. 

So you’d expect some tension.


Amid furor over an email leak that revealed a bias against Bernie Sanders inside the Democratic National Committee, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced Sunday she will step down as chair.

Wasserman Schultz will still open and close the convention, she said in a statement, and "address our delegates about the stakes involved in this election not only for Democrats, but for all Americans."

A Native American caucus is in Philadelphia this week to speak for the priorities of Northwest tribes at the Democratic National Convention.

While many pundits and political observers were quick to praise Hillary Clinton's pick of Tim Kaine as her running mate on Friday, the choice wasn't met with universal acclaim.

One important group — progressives and backers of Clinton's former rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders — were not as pleased with the selection of the Virginia senator who has cultivated a reputation of working across the aisle over the course of his political career.

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