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Egypt

The 2,200-year-old mummy of an Egyptian man who spent a lot of time sitting and eating carbs went on display at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem on Tuesday and will be open to the public beginning Wednesday.

Solar Impulse 2 has landed in Cairo, completing the penultimate leg of its attempt to circumnavigate the globe using only the power of the sun.

The trip over the Mediterranean included a breathtaking flyover of the Pyramids. Check it out:

Egypt deports TV host as Sisi's crackdown on dissent continues

Jun 30, 2016
S
The Egyptian Presidency

Until Monday, Liliane Daoud was a host for the Egyptian TV station ONTV.

But that changed when eight plainclothes police officers showed up at her house in Cairo and arrested her. She asked that they show her their IDs but they refused. She was taken straight to the airport and put on a plane to Beirut — deported out of the country she has called home for the past five years.

"Ca."

When Ranwa Yehia heard her nearly 3-year-old son, Nadeem, making this sound, she got cold shivers all over her body. After three months of saying "cat," Nadeem couldn't say the whole word anymore.

Shortly after, Yehia was told she could no longer bring her son to his nursery school unless the family could get another teacher to shadow him in class.

What was going on with Nadeem?

Updated May 20 at 7:00 p.m. ET

Automated transmissions from the missing EgyptAir plane reportedly indicate smoke was detected in a bathroom. The data are among the last bits of information collected from Flight 804, which disappeared from radar and crashed into the Mediterranean Sea as it headed for Cairo on Wednesday.

Seattle Playwright Yussef El Guindi.
Courtesy ACT Theatre

Seattle-based playwright Yussef El Guindi was born in Egypt. But he feels more at ease in his adopted home.

"Egypt is always going to a part of my background, my heritage," he says. "But I've been here 30 years now. I definitely consider myself American."

Three journalists who work for the Al-Jazeera news network have been sentenced to prison terms — two lasting seven years and a third lasting 10 — by an Egyptian court. The three were accused of aiding terrorists, a term that in this case applies to the banned Muslim Brotherhood.

From Egypt's Ahram Online:

Deadly Blasts Hit Police In Cairo

Jan 24, 2014
AP Photo/Sabry Khaled

Six people have been killed and some 100 others wounded in a series of explosions in the Egyptian capital of Cairo.

A powerful car bomb exploded outside the police headquarters in central Cairo on Friday morning, killing four people and wounding at least 76.

Flickr Photo/Mitch Altman

Marcie Sillman talks with Haleh Esfandiari, director of the Middle East Program at the Wilson Center, about the bloc of amendments to the Egyptian constitution that will be voted on next week.

Flickr Photo/FreedomHouse

Marcie Sillman interviews Thanassis Cambanis about his reasons for optimism in the Middle East despite the crackdowns by repressive regimes following the Arab Spring.

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Ross Reynolds talks with Christian Science Monitor Cairo correspondent Kristen Chick about Mohamed Morsi's trial, Kerry's visit to Egypt and protests within the country.

AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

Hundreds of people gathered at a mosque in Ramses Square on Friday, after the Muslim Brotherhood, of which Mr. Morsi is a member, appealed to its supporters to join a "march of anger".

The demonstrations are taking place under the slogan "the people want to topple the coup" - referring to the military's removal of Mr. Morsi on 3 July.

KUOW Photo/Katy Sewell

An Update From Egypt
Tens of thousands of Muslim Brotherhood supporters took to the streets of Cairo today, following yesterday’s violent crackdown by the Egyptian military in which more than 600 people were killed. The protests come more than six weeks after President Mohamed Morsi was deposed by the military. We’ll get the very latest from journalist D. Parvaz. She’s covering the situation in Cairo for Al Jazeera English. Then Dr. Stephen Majeski, political science professor at the University of Washington, explains how President Obama’s foreign policy plan has been working in Egypt.

On the Job: Animal Eye Surgery
Katy Sewall visits the Seattle Animal Eye Clinic to watch Dr. Thomas Sullivan perform a Vitreoretinal surgery on a miniature poodle.  

A Visit To The Weekday Warehouse
Steve Scher and Katy Sewall meet at the “Weekday Warehouse” to unearth some of the strange and wonderful interviews that were featured on Weekday.

Flickr Photo/Madison Guy

Violence Erupts In Egypt
Egyptian troops moved into Cairo to break up the anti-government protests today. The country has declared a state of emergency as violence escalates. Kristen Chick is the Cairo correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor. She reports on the latest.   

What's Moving Into The PacMed Building?
Community college classroom space or view apartments? The public agency that owns the Pacific Medical Center atop Beacon Hill decided which one will occupy the art deco former military hospital on Tuesday night. The Pacific Hospital Preservation and Development Authority looked at proposals from Seattle Central Community College and a Miami-based developer. We talk with PHPDA executive director Rosemary Aragon.

Re-Thinking Conservation
For much of its existence The Nature Conservancy has bought acres upon acres of land to protect it from human development. Peter Kareiva, the chief scientist for The Nature Conservancy, believes a different philosophy is needed in order to deal with the “Age of Man.” He explains his conservation ideas and what a new study on climate change and nature can tell us about resilient environments.

Egypt Declares National Emergency

Aug 14, 2013
AP Photo/Ahmed Gomaa

Egypt's presidency has declared a state of emergency after scores of people were killed when security forces stormed protest camps in Cairo.

The camps had been occupied by supporters of former president Mohammed Morsi, who was deposed in early July.

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