Egypt

Three journalists who work for the Al-Jazeera news network have been sentenced to prison terms — two lasting seven years and a third lasting 10 — by an Egyptian court. The three were accused of aiding terrorists, a term that in this case applies to the banned Muslim Brotherhood.

From Egypt's Ahram Online:

Deadly Blasts Hit Police In Cairo

Jan 24, 2014
AP Photo/Sabry Khaled

Six people have been killed and some 100 others wounded in a series of explosions in the Egyptian capital of Cairo.

A powerful car bomb exploded outside the police headquarters in central Cairo on Friday morning, killing four people and wounding at least 76.

Flickr Photo/Mitch Altman

Marcie Sillman talks with Haleh Esfandiari, director of the Middle East Program at the Wilson Center, about the bloc of amendments to the Egyptian constitution that will be voted on next week.

Flickr Photo/FreedomHouse

Marcie Sillman interviews Thanassis Cambanis about his reasons for optimism in the Middle East despite the crackdowns by repressive regimes following the Arab Spring.

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Ross Reynolds talks with Christian Science Monitor Cairo correspondent Kristen Chick about Mohamed Morsi's trial, Kerry's visit to Egypt and protests within the country.

AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

Hundreds of people gathered at a mosque in Ramses Square on Friday, after the Muslim Brotherhood, of which Mr. Morsi is a member, appealed to its supporters to join a "march of anger".

The demonstrations are taking place under the slogan "the people want to topple the coup" - referring to the military's removal of Mr. Morsi on 3 July.

KUOW Photo/Katy Sewell

An Update From Egypt
Tens of thousands of Muslim Brotherhood supporters took to the streets of Cairo today, following yesterday’s violent crackdown by the Egyptian military in which more than 600 people were killed. The protests come more than six weeks after President Mohamed Morsi was deposed by the military. We’ll get the very latest from journalist D. Parvaz. She’s covering the situation in Cairo for Al Jazeera English. Then Dr. Stephen Majeski, political science professor at the University of Washington, explains how President Obama’s foreign policy plan has been working in Egypt.

On the Job: Animal Eye Surgery
Katy Sewall visits the Seattle Animal Eye Clinic to watch Dr. Thomas Sullivan perform a Vitreoretinal surgery on a miniature poodle.  

A Visit To The Weekday Warehouse
Steve Scher and Katy Sewall meet at the “Weekday Warehouse” to unearth some of the strange and wonderful interviews that were featured on Weekday.

Flickr Photo/Madison Guy

Violence Erupts In Egypt
Egyptian troops moved into Cairo to break up the anti-government protests today. The country has declared a state of emergency as violence escalates. Kristen Chick is the Cairo correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor. She reports on the latest.   

What's Moving Into The PacMed Building?
Community college classroom space or view apartments? The public agency that owns the Pacific Medical Center atop Beacon Hill decided which one will occupy the art deco former military hospital on Tuesday night. The Pacific Hospital Preservation and Development Authority looked at proposals from Seattle Central Community College and a Miami-based developer. We talk with PHPDA executive director Rosemary Aragon.

Re-Thinking Conservation
For much of its existence The Nature Conservancy has bought acres upon acres of land to protect it from human development. Peter Kareiva, the chief scientist for The Nature Conservancy, believes a different philosophy is needed in order to deal with the “Age of Man.” He explains his conservation ideas and what a new study on climate change and nature can tell us about resilient environments.

Egypt Declares National Emergency

Aug 14, 2013
AP Photo/Ahmed Gomaa

Egypt's presidency has declared a state of emergency after scores of people were killed when security forces stormed protest camps in Cairo.

The camps had been occupied by supporters of former president Mohammed Morsi, who was deposed in early July.

Jesse Bering's book "Why is the Penis Shaped Like That?"

Protests In Egypt
Supporters and opponents to former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi held rallies throughout Egypt on Friday. Tensions between the two sides have been escalating over the past month resulting in the death of over 100 people. We get an update on the situation in Egypt from Middle East correspondent for the Financial Times, Borzou Daragahi. We also talk with Maha Jashan, a local Egyptian-American, on how she’s been following the events in Egypt from Seattle. 

"Why Is The Penis Shaped Like That? And Other Reflections On Being Human"
Being human is very different than being a chimpanzee, or a bumble bee, or a rat. We think different, we act different, and we look different. Psychological scientist Jesse Bering explores what it means to be human by asking questions that are sometimes outside the realm of “polite conversation.” 

New State Laws On The Books
Starting today, it will be easier for the wrongly convicted to receive restitution for jail time served, people parking in electric vehicle charging stations will be fined if they aren’t plugged in, and bosses can no longer demand social media passwords from prospective employees. Everett Herald reporter and columnist Jerry Cornfield gives us an overview.

Revolutionary Graffiti In Egypt

Jul 11, 2013
Flickr photo/ ganzeer

In Cairo, there's a second revolution happening. A revolution in street art. The city's blank walls have given room for people to vent their frustration with everyone from the deposed leader Mohammed Morsi to the military, whose popular takeover has brought yet another flavor of indiscriminate violence. The complexity of the Egyptian situation is reflected in its graffiti, where ancient hieroglyphic pharaoh motifs find new meaning as inspirational symbols for ordinary people.

Today, we aired an interview with blogger Soraya Morayef, who tracks Egyptian graffiti on her blog.

Full list of stories on KUOW Presents, July 11:

Flickr Photo/Kimmo Raisanen

The Continuing Unrest In Egypt

The ousting of former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was not popular with all Egyptians. Over 50 supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood were killed in a clash between protesters and the military earlier this week. Interim President Adly Mansour has begun appointing new cabinet members and has moved forward with a roadmap to a democratic election. What does the future hold for Egypt and what is happening there now? Borzou Daragahi of the Financial Times joins us for an update.

Escape From Camp 14: From North Korea To The West
Shin Dong-Hyuk was born in Camp 14, a political prison camp in North Korea. No one born inside the camp has ever escaped, except for Shin. Katy Sewall talks with journalist Blaine Harden about the story of a remarkable escape.

A Conversation With Paula Poundstone
Comedian Paula Poundstone is widely known for her stand-up act and formidable trivia chops on NPR’s Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! She has a new comedy CD, “I Heart Jokes” and will be performing at Tacoma’s Pantages Theatre on Friday. She joins us from the studios of NPR West in Los Angelas.

Tony Angell
Flickr photo/Andrew Nicholson

Naturalist, illustrator and sculptor Tony Angell shares his home and his imagination with birds. He joins us to talk about the ecological role birds play in our lives and how the natural world inspires his creativity.