Edward Snowden

Flickr Photo/Sam Agnew

The Obama administration must restore trust in U.S. technology companies and uphold America’s fundamental liberties, Microsoft’s chief counsel wrote in a strongly-worded blog post.

AP Photo/Bruce Smith

David Hyde talks with Ben Wizner, director of American Civil Liberties Union's Speech, Privacy And Technology Project, about former NSA contractor, Edward Snowden, and how Snowden's leaks have changed privacy in the United States.

Marcie Sillman talks with Randy Barnett, Georgetown University constitutional law expert, about what promises to be a long legal battle over NSA surveillance.

U.S. and British intelligence agencies have worked to infiltrate networks of violence-prone individuals who might unite for a common cause. And in some cases, the spies are also targeting networks that aren't regional terrorist cells — they're online gaming communities, according to the latest revelation from documents given to the media by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

Steve Scher talks with political scientist Henry Farrell about the national security concerns that swirl around leakers like Edward Snowden and how publicizing national secrets affects American foreign policy.

Flickr Photo/President of the European Council

Reports that the United States has been spying on our European allies has caused outrage in the region. According to documents leaked to The Guardian by former National Security Agency employee Edward Snowden, the NSA has monitored the phone conversations of up to 35 world leaders.

The European Union held a council meeting yesterday and today in Brussels. The original purpose of the meeting was to discuss the economy and job growth, but that was quickly overshadowed by talk of security and trust. Allies spying on allies is nothing new, so why the anger about the revelations? Charles Kupchan, senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, explains why this time is different and what the diplomatic fallout will be for the United States.

How J. Edgar Hoover Set The Stage For NSA Surveillance

Aug 8, 2013
Courtesy of FBI

Edward Snowden's revelations about the scope of US government surveillance programs took many people by surprise. But the federal government has been tracking people's personal information for a long time.

Surveillance really took off in 1919. That's when a young Department of Defense lawyer named J. Edgar Hoover was tapped to head a brand new division of the department: the Radical Division. Hoover was only 24 years old at the time.

Historian Beverly Gage is writing a biography of Hoover. Today on KUOW Presents Brian Balogh asks her: Why Hoover? What qualified this young upstart to take over the government surveillance of radicals?

Full list of stories on KUOW Presents, August 8: