education

Flickr Photo/Miss USA Redneck (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton about Washington state's proposal to trim university budgets by as much as 15 percent.

Flickr Photo/Allison Waffles (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Should you be insulted when billionaires bigfoot an election? Do you resent apodment dwellers, tatted-up baristas, or the NFL for dismissing domestic violence? Plus, what do you think of the activists who want to take Seattle's $15 minimum wage cross the bridge?

Bill Radke reviews the week’s news with Crosscut's Knute Berger, C.R. Douglas of Q13 FOX News and KUOW's Deborah Wang. Special guests include Seattle Times sportswriter Percy Allen and LiveWire host Luke Burbank.

Dana Goldstein's book "The Teacher Wars"

Marcie Sillman talks to journalist Dana Goldstein about her new book, "The Teacher Wars: A History of America's Most Embattled Profession," which delves into how standardized testing has changed the classroom and the future of education in the United States.

Olympia Washington State Legislature
Flickr Photo/Harvey Barrison (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the Washington Supreme Court's ruling that finds the Legislature in contempt for failing to fund basic education.

In an unprecedented move, the Washington Supreme Court has ruled the state in contempt of court in the McCleary school funding case. However, the justices will wait to impose sanctions until after the 2015 legislative session to give the legislature time to "purge the contempt."

"[C]ontempt is the means by which a court enforces compliance with its lawful orders when they are not followed," reads the five-page order signed by Chief Justice Barbara Madsen.

Janna Espinoza's daughter Coraline has hearing loss, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and developmental delays. Nearly 2 years old, she can't sit up, stand, creep or use her hands as a typically developing child does.

Coraline is among an estimated 6.4 million children in the U.S. with a disability. And for these kids the simple ritual of playing outside can get very complicated.

"My daughter can't do very much at a typical playground, except watch her older sister play," says Espinoza. "Playgrounds are a depressing place for us."

What We’re Really Saying When We Call Kids ‘Smart’

Sep 9, 2014
Flickr Photo/jeweledlion (CC-BY-NC-ND)

So many first day of school pictures today!

In posting one of them, my friend Gwyn revealed that her smiling daughter had actually been more upset than she appeared in the photo.

Not because school had started, but because she wasn’t in the “smart kids” class with her friends. She knew it was for “smart kids” because those kids had said so. They had heard it from their parents.

These are six-year-olds.

An epic swim hole and university party spot on public land in Eastern Washington has been closed down after nearly 2,000 people mobbed the spot this past weekend.

Flickr Photo/Hammerin Man (CC-BY-NC-ND)

School is back in session. Washington state lawmakers are not in session, but they were still in the principal's office this week. Also in trouble: bikini baristas and Christopher Columbus. Bill Radke discusses it all with Joni Balter, Knute Berger, Essex Porter and Luke Burbank.

It’s the first day of school for more than a million students, as New York City schools are back in session today.

But there is a new crop of youngsters donning backpacks and school uniforms, as Mayor Bill DeBlasio’s new free universal pre-kindergarten program commences. Tens of thousands of 4-year-olds will head to more than 1,700 sites across the city to begin their academic careers.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee says the legislature has not “acted appropriately” in the face of the McCleary decision on school funding. But he cautioned the state Supreme Court Thursday not to impose sanctions that would penalize other areas of state government.

  The Washington Supreme Court has heard the arguments. Now it must decide whether to hold the state in contempt for failing to submit a complete plan to fully fund schools.

Police in Pocatello, Idaho, are investigating how a university professor accidentally shot himself in the foot during class.

At corporations, leadership matters. A lot. Think of the impact of the late Steve Jobs at Apple or Facebook's Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg today, to name a couple.

CEOs often play a vital role in bolstering a company's performance, image and culture of success. (Although studies show that obscenely high CEO compensation isn't always the best incentive.)

Washington state capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle attorney Phil Talmadge about the ongoing showdown between the State Supreme Court and the Washington State Legislature over funding K-12 education. Talmadge is a former state supreme court justice and a former state senator.

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