Sawhorse Revolution designed and built this tiny house, with the intent to donate it to the homeless camp known as Nickelsville. The idea is to have tiny houses rather than tents at this new homeless camp in the Central District.
Courtesy of Alec Gardner

"The Nest," as the students call it, is a serious step up from a tent.

There's no plumbing or electricity, but it's watertight, insulated and has walls and a lock. And it was designed with a homeless person in mind.

Mary Gates Hall, University of Washington
Flickr Photo/Nam-ho Park (CC BY 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds speaks with Amy Hagopian, an associate professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington, about why she's joined an effort to unionize faculty at the University of Washington.

Red Square, University of Washington campus
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC BY NC ND)/

David Hyde speaks with Norm Arkans, associate vice president of media relations and communications at the University of Washington, about why the UW administration has "grave reservations" about an attempt by some of the UW faculty to unionize.

Editor’s note: KUOW is a self-sustaining service of the University of Washington. Arkans is an ex-officio member of the Puget Sound Public Radio Board of Directors. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with Brandy Sincyr, a program assistant with Columbia Legal Services and the author of a report counting homeless students in Washington, about why the group thinks schools have been undercounting their homeless students.

Seattle Aquarium veterinarian Lesanna Lahner checks Mishka's fur after the otter was transferred from Seward, Alaska in February 2015.
KUOW Photo/Sara Lerner

Did the Seattle teachers strike change the conversation about public education? Why is China’s president stopping in Seattle on his way to D.C.? And why does a sea otter at the aquarium need an inhaler?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter, Paul Guppy of the Washington Policy Center and former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels.

Back when Grant Hosford's older daughter was in first grade, she signed up for an extracurricular class, building robots with a programmable Lego toy called Mindstorms. Hosford, a dot-com entrepreneur, came to visit the class and was startled to see that Naomi, who loves science and math, was both the only girl there and the youngest by a couple of years.

"My first reaction was not, 'Oh, I'm going to go build a coding company.' My first reaction was, 'What can I build for my daughter that will help her down this path?' "

Seattle students Tamar Rosenblum, 7, and Natalya McConnell, 10.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke speaks with Natalya McConnell and Tamar Rosenblum. They returned to school today, along with more than 50,000 Seattle students, after the teachers' union reached a tentative contract agreement with the school district. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with Lincoln High School principal Patrick Erwin about the upcoming visit of Chinese President Xi Jinping.

So you finally get the chance to meet one-on-one with your child's teacher — now what?

Like a good Scout, be prepared: Educators agree that doing your homework before a parent-teacher conference can make a big difference.

Does More Class Time Equal More Learning?

Sep 16, 2015
Education classroom
Flickr Photo/Marie (CC BY SA 2.0)

Ross Reynolds talks to Jennifer McMurrer, director of research at the Center on Education Policy, about how longer school days affect student performance. One of the sticking points in the Seattle teacher's strike was class time. Under the new tentative contract, students will spend 20 more minutes in school. 

Imagine you're a principal, walking through the crowded halls of your school. You're on your way to 11th grade chemistry, to watch a science lab. They're expecting you in two minutes.

It already feels like a long day and it's not even lunchtime. You're nearly there, 30 seconds to spare, but then — out of the corner of your eye — you see a student wearing cutoff shorts. And they're really, really short.

What should you do?

Stopping to have a disciplinary chat is probably the last thing you want to do. But, rules are rules, right?

Teachers and supporters march down First Avenue South on their way to the Seattle Public Schools headquarters south of downtown on Tuesday.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

The strike appears to be over.

Seattle teachers union representatives and school district leaders announced Tuesday night the approval of a tentative agreement.

Former Representative Ross Hunter, in a photo from 2009.
Flickr Photo/Michael B. (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Ross Reynolds sits down with Ross Hunter, former Microsoft executive and state legislator, to talk about his time in the state House and his new job as director of the Washington Department of Early Learning.

Olympic College in Bremerton will receive money that will help to pay for a veteran center for students.
Olympic College

Lake Washington Institute of Technology in Kirkland and Olympic College in Bremerton will get a little more than $100,000 for the next three years to help student veterans.

The grants from the Department of Education will help create centers for student veterans. 

Teachers and supporters march down First Avenue South on their way to the Seattle Public Schools headquarters south of downtown on Tuesday.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

The Seattle teachers union and the school district said Tuesday they have reached a tentative contract agreement to end a week-long strike.

The district said its 53,000 students could return to class as soon as Thursday if the deal goes through. Union officials were meeting Tuesday afternoon to discuss the proposal.