education

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

The 7- and 8-year-olds in this math class at Hawthorne Elementary School in Seattle's Columbia City neighborhood seem oblivious to the sunshine beating down on the playground outside. They're busy lining up red, green, blue and yellow tiles in neat staircases. 

Highline senior Lesley Delgadillo's graduation is held up by one thing: the biology exit exam newly required in Washington state this year.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Washington State Senate Republicans and Democrats have agreed to delay a requirement for high school students to pass a biology exit exam this year and 2016.

This helps about 2,000 high school seniors who were supposed to graduate in June, but still hadn't met the science requirement.

One of the students is Lesley Delgadillo, whose story we brought you last month.

The Washington state Senate voted Thursday afternoon to delay a voter-approved class size measure and a biology test high school graduation requirement.

Why do you do what you do? What is the engine that keeps you up late at night or gets you going in the morning? Where is your happy place? What stands between you and your ultimate dream?

Heavy questions. One researcher believes that writing down the answers can be decisive for students.

Seattle sunrise.
Flickr Photo/Michael B. (CC BY NC ND)

It’s fair to say that dire warnings about climate change have become the new normal. Consider these recent headlines from NASA’s Climate Change Blog: "Turkish Glaciers Shrink By Half," "A Third Of Big Groundwater Basins In Distress," "It's The Final Act For Larsen B Ice Shelf," and "Longer Melt Season A Game Changer For Arctic Mammals."

So we shouldn’t expect a great punch line when our bar scenario takes place, as it did recently at Columbia City’s Royal Room. 

Washington Senate Republicans have agreed to suspend a biology exam requirement that’s keeping nearly 2,000 high school students from graduating.

Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about why lawmakers are still in session and what state Democrats want before the session ends.

The first four providers of the city's new subsidized preschool program were unveiled Monday, and they're primarily in South Seattle.

Beginning this fall, the first Seattle Preschool Program sites will offer free or sliding-scale tuition to about 230 children who are 3 or 4 years old.

LA County Parks and Recreation

What started out as a relatively simple case of high school bullying escalated quickly to what prosecutors describe as torture, kidnapping and assault.

On March 30, 18-year-old Yiran "Camellia" Liu was the victim of a violent attack in the Los Angeles suburb of Rowland Heights.

Liu testified last week at a preliminary hearing that Yunyao "Helen" Zhai, Yuhan "Coco" Yang and Xinlei "John" Zhang took her to Rowland Heights Park, where they stripped her naked, kicked her,  slapped her hundreds of times and burned her nipples with cigarettes.

The motive for the attack?

Oregon Senate Approves Tuition Waiver Program

Jul 2, 2015

Oregon students could soon have an easier time paying for community college. The state Senate passed a bill Thursday that would waive tuition for some high school graduates.

A Clallam County woman was exposed to measles at a health clinic. She died three months ago at the University of Washington Medical Center, where she was transferred after being treated in Clallam County.
University of Washington Medical Center

A Clallam County woman died of a measles infection three months ago, health officials said on Thursday, making her the first person to die of measles in Washington state in 25 years.

She was the first person to die in the U.S. in 12 years.

Washington state's brand new operating budget was not even hours old Wednesday when it sprung a big hole.

A $2 billion hole.

(Photo courtesy of the University of Washington)

Update: Two days after this story was published, on Tuesday, June 30, Gov. Jay Inslee signed Washington’s state budget. The new budget includes $20 million over the next two years for drug prevention and education.

The campaign to legalize marijuana promised that almost a quarter of the taxes from those sales would fund education and prevention efforts.

And pot is selling well: Washington state’s marijuana retail stores are selling over $1 million worth of marijuana a day.

Two minutes into Present Tense, a short film made by three high school students in a fishing village in the East African island of Zanzibar, a set of subtitles lay out their mission:

Ross Reynolds interviews University of Washington emeritus professor Roger Roffman about moves in the state legislature to redirect marijuana tax revenue away from education to balance the budget. Roffman explains what he thinks the impact will be on public health.

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