education

Flickr Photo/Barnaby Wasson (CC BY-NC-ND)

Seattle voters will see two competing child care initiatives on their fall ballots.

A proposal from the mayor and City Council would create a subsidized preschool program for 3- and 4-year-olds.

The Secret Lives Of Teachers

Oct 20, 2014

So where do they go, all the teachers, when the bell rings at 3 o'clock?

When you're a kid, you don't really think they go anywhere. Except home, maybe, to grade papers and plan lessons and think up pop quizzes.

And when you find out otherwise, it's a strange experience. Many people remember it vividly: the disorienting feeling of encountering your teacher in the grocery store, or in the line at McDonald's, talking and acting just like other grownups. A jarring reminder that they have lives outside the classroom.

Flickr Photo/Chris Campbell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Diane Schanzenbach, associate professor of human development and social policy at Northwestern University, about what research says about the efficacy of class size in education. 

Flickr Photo/ccarlstead (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about state Initiative 1351 to reduce class sizes.

For more KUOW elections coverage, visit the Election Connection page.  

 

 

 

Flickr Photo/Benjamin Chun

  When Beacon Hill International School in Seattle submitted its tests last spring, district officials spotted improbably high scores schoolwide.

Now, the state schools office has invalidated test results for the elementary school. This is the first time an entire school’s state test scores have been thrown out due to tampering.

Marcie Silman talks with Washington State University President Elson Floyd about why creating a medical school is in line with WSU's mission as a land grant institution. 

Flickr Photo/Dan Hatton (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Instead of vaccinating her children for chickenpox, Kimberly Christensen chose the old fashioned way to immunize them – sending her kids to hang out with infected children. 

What Poverty Can Do To A Baby's Brain

Oct 12, 2014
Courtesy of Neighborcare Health

“Myth or fact? Smoking anywhere around the baby can increase the risk of infant death.”

A half dozen pregnant women at the Columbia Public Health Center in South Seattle take turns reading statements about infant care and discussing whether they agree with the claims.

Courtesy of Highline Public Schools

In a modern kindergarten class, you rarely see one lesson underway at once.

At Bow Lake Elementary in SeaTac, these new kindergarteners are studying reading – and social skills – and how to work as a group.

PoorStart
KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

Last year, Velma Chaney and her fiancé moved to Seattle from Mississippi with their three young children in search of a stronger job market. Her sister and nephew came too.

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

  On a sunny afternoon, 18-year-old Margaret Rim bounces her infant son on her knee in an empty classroom at South Lake High School.

A public health nurse, Emma Spohn, sits down next to her.

PoorStart
KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

Preschool can look like fun and games.

But high-quality preschools use play to teach children the academic, social and developmental skills that they’ll need for kindergarten.

Ross Reynolds speaks with University of Washington spokesman Norm Arkans about hazing allegations at one of the college's fraternities, Beta Thea Pi.

Reynolds also talks with Caitlin Flanagan, author of article "The Dark Power of Fraternities," about what happens when the national headquarters of a fraternity investigates one of its chapters.

Let's start with a little word problem. Sixty percent of the nation's 12.8 million community college students are required to take at least one course in subject X. Eighty percent of that 60 percent never move on past that requirement.

  1. Let Y = the total percentage of community college students prevented from graduating simply by failing that one subject, X. What is Y?

    The answer: Y = 48.

  2. And if you haven't guessed it by now, What is X?

"I went to a four-year university." "That job requires a one-year certificate." "It's a two-semester course." "She's a fifth-year senior." What do these expressions have in common? They use time as the yardstick for higher education.

Essentially, this means measuring not how much you've learned, but how long you've spent trying to learn it.

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