education

Low Income Housing Institute

Ross Reynolds talks to John Miller, assistant executive director at the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association, about how research into risks associated with school sports is changing attitudes and activities in Washington state and beyond.

Is This Any Way To Pick A College?

May 20, 2014

There are more than 7,000 colleges in the U.S., and 21.8 million students enrolled in them. That's potentially 21.8 million opinions about what makes a school "the best."

The penalty for a bad choice can be huge. The cost of a degree continues to soar, graduation rates vary widely from college to college, and a growing body of evidence suggests that picking a supposedly "top" school doesn't necessarily pay off later in life.

Flickr Photo/Robbie Veldwijk

Cats have four legs. Dogs have four legs. So obviously, all animals have four legs.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle City Council President Tim Burgess about the recently unveiled proposal to fund universal pre-K in Seattle. The proposal was announced today by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, Councilmember Burgess, and Seattle Schools Superintendent Jose Banda. If approved by the City Council, the proposal will be forwarded to the November ballot.

Photo Credit Playworks

The recess for the youngest students at Ardmore Elementary School in Bellevue doesn’t look like your typical recess.

Ross Reynolds talks to Dr. Anthony Pellegrini, a professor of educational psychology at the University of Minnesota, about the role of recess in schools. Dr. Pellegrini has been researching the importance of recess since the early 1980s.

Graduation Season? More like Disinvitation Season.

As students across the country prepare for pomp and circumstance, college and university administrators are grappling with a series of commencement speech boondoggles.

This year alone, nearly a dozen big-name commencement speakers — including the head of the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde, and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice — have been invited to speak at graduation ceremonies, only to withdraw or have their invitations rescinded in the wake of campus protests.

The number of preschoolers enrolled in state-funded early childhood education programs is dropping nationally.

In decades past, elementary students had recess several times a day.

Today, parents and teachers across the country report dramatic cutbacks to that free time. In Seattle, the length of recess varies dramatically from school to school – from an hour to just 15 minutes.

Ross Reynolds talks to Jonathan Knapp, president of the Seattle Education Association, about No Child Left Behind and his narrow victory over challenger Jesse Hagopian for union president.

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

At a playfield in West Seattle, physical education teacher C.J. Sealey referees with a piercing whistle. Sealey aims to get these kids moving – after all, state law demands that elementary and middle school students get at least 100 minutes of P.E. every week.

Marcie Sillman talks to Seattle Times reporter Katherine Long about tuition increases in Washington since the beginning of the recession. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, the state's four-year public colleges have experienced the second-highest tuition hike in the country.

Marcie Sillman talks with co-founder of Social Equality Educators and high school teacher, Jesse Hagopian, about his goals for Seattle classrooms.

School Districts Explore Solutions For Too Many Portable Classrooms

May 9, 2014
EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

SPOKANE, Washington — Teachers at Spokane’s Jefferson Elementary don’t have to look far to know what they left behind.

States Don't Limit Use Of Portable Classrooms

May 8, 2014
EarthFix Photo/Cassandra Profita

AUMSVILLE, Oregon – After affixing the roof to the walls, five workers push a half-built classroom out the door of the Blazer Industries manufacturing plant. Clearly, this is a portable classroom.

It’s one of about 130 portables Blazer has been contracted to build this year. Most will go to overcrowded schools in Washington state, and most will be built in four to seven days. Inside this warehouse, the company has built entire schools, churches, hospitals and high-end homes — one truckable piece at a time.

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