education

Flickr Photo/Nick Amoscato (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Don Nielsen, former member of the Seattle School Board and author of the new book, "Every School: One Citizens' Guide To Transforming Education," about his thoughts on the school system. 

We asked for nominations for "most misused word or phrase," and they came pouring in. Weekend Edition listeners and NPR.org readers have many gripes about the grammar gaffes they see and hear every day.

From nearly 450 story comments, 500 emails and more than 900 Facebook posts we received in December, we identified 275 separate nominees. Here's a top 10 countdown of the most frequently mentioned:

When the children's television show Sesame Street first hit the air in 1969, many were deeply skeptical that you could use TV to introduce very young children to the basics of reading and math. But the experiment proved to be a remarkable success; Sesame Street has reached several generations of toddlers with its combination of educational content and pure entertainment. And now, Sesame Workshop is using new technology to reach the next generation.

Thomas O'Donnell's kindergarten kids are all hopped up to read about Twiggle the anthropomorphic Turtle.

"Who can tell me why Twiggle here is sad," O'Donnell asks his class at Matthew Henson Elementary School in Baltimore.

"Because he doesn't have no friends," a student pipes up.

And how do people look when they're sad?

"They look down!" the whole class screams out.

Yeah, Twiggle is lonely. But, eventually, he befriends a hedgehog, a duck and a dog. And along the way, he learns how to play, help and share.

Laurie Fendrich took a buyout from Hofstra University to retire when she was 66-years-old. In an article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Fendrich argues that other college professors should follow her example because remaining on faculty indefinitely is bad for students and universities.

Washington State Legislature in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with KUOW's Olympia corespondent, Austin Jenkins, about a few of the biggest stories of the year from the Washington State Legislature

Foster High School senior Nandina Cengic is a feminist, filmmaker and activist.
Courtesy of Jesenko Spahic

Do you hate men?

Nandina Cengic said she hears that question all the time. That's because the Foster High School senior tells people she is a feminist. As she puts it, people assume she's a "man hater," who's "trying to squander men."

"Which isn't true at all!" she said. 

Last week, the Taliban attacked the Army Public School in Peshawar, Pakistan, killing more than 140 people, most of them schoolchildren.

Professor Ralina Joseph at the University of Washington says to just start talking about race.
University of Washington

Protests over high profile police shootings have renewed calls to discuss police treatment of African-Americans – and talk about race relations in general. But how do we have those difficult and often awkward conversations? KUOW’s Jamala Henderson put that question to University of Washington Professor Ralina Joseph. Highlights from the interview:

How do I talk about race with family and friends?

Olympia Washington State Legislature
Flickr Photo/Harvey Barrison (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW's Olympia correspondent, Austin Jenkins, about the upcoming session and what that could mean for education funding in Washington state.

School desk
Flickr Photo/ccarlstead (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Steve Sundquist, chair of the Washington State Charter School Commission, about the probation of Washington's first charter school and what it means for the many schools set to open next year.

U.S. Senator Patty Murray
Flickr Photo/Senate Democrats (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with U.S. Senator Patty Murray about her top legislative priorities for 2015.

When College Is Not For Everyone

Dec 17, 2014

There’s a disconnect between education and business, says Bill Symonds. He believes the education system is not adequately preparing young people to enter the workforce and lead successful lives.

One by one, in a room just off the gym floor at Edna Brewer Middle School in Oakland, Calif., seventh-graders go on the interview hot seat.

Some 80 students have applied to be "peer leaders" in the school's new, alternative discipline program called "restorative justice."

Kyle McClerkins, the program's director, grills them on aspects of adolescent life: "What is the biggest challenge for middle school girls? What has changed about you from sixth grade to now?"

Scantron test sheet
Flickr Photo/COCOEN daily photos (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Jesse Hagopian, history teacher at Garfield High School, about his book "More Than A Score: The New Uprising Against High Stakes Testing."

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